Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

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    I know all you guys and gals know this stuff, but some little niggles in the diodes down my LHS made me start a-googlin' preferred practices on clutch cable free play adjustment and I found this basic but very clear vid. Amazing the clarity of explanation you can get with CAD stuff and I love her voice, I think I'll make an audio loop of it to crash out to.
  2. LogHouseBikers

    LogHouseBikers Been here awhile Supporter

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    I won't mention the American brand name of the bikes I did road-side repairs to. :dunno Also, the age of the bikes or their history. I will add sometimes the issue was fuel related, sometimes high elevation related.
  3. Jetlag Jon

    Jetlag Jon Been here awhile

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    Personally I prefer EFI. No adjustments needed for altitude. My bike ran fine all the way from sea level to 16000 feet and back again.
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  4. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah, I can see EFI being a pretty big benefit in places with a lot of altitude change. Where I live, most all of my riding is between around ~850 (home) and something under 4500 feet. Hell, the highest point east of the Mississippi is Mt. Mitchell, in NC, at 6684 feet at the summit. But even most roads up in that area are around 5000 feet or under I think, with a few a passes a bit over. So, where I ride, I've never even given the altitude any consideration other than maybe to stop and take a photo at a roadside sign that announces a high (for us) altitude. :lol3 I've never noticed any of my bikes running differently one way or the other... Guess that difference is situationally dependent...
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  5. radare

    radare One part at a time

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    I've had many of my bikes all the way up to the top of Mt. Evans at just over 14000 feet. That's a climb of nearly 8000 feet from where I live. The carbureted bikes run really rich at the higher altitudes and at 14k feet, starting and idling takes some effort. My XJ has four carbs. It gets really finicky at that elevation and its been jetted for higher altitude riding. I haven't had my Himalayan up there yet but the Classic took the trip just fine. It did run rich at the top. EFI offers a significant improvement in rideability when riding at elevation.

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  6. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    The XJ600, the only bike I ever purchased new from a dealership (in the west) - such a beauty. Drove it 6 years together with a 500 Bullet (old iron). The Bullet eventually had to go, the left/right gearshift drove my muscle memory nuts.
    If it wasn't for a chain that ripped thru the gearbox at 180 kmh I probably would still drive it. A novice mechanic had changed the chain and not locked it properly. Had to make space for a shaft driven BMW after than little incident.
  7. Leyprest

    Leyprest Adventurer

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    Does anyone know where I can acquire a new plug for the back of my instrument cluster on my Himalayan? (The one that goes from the main loom into the back of the clocks)
    Or what the part number/name is for that type of plug? I'm guessing it's a generic plug connector of some description.
  8. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    Think it only comes with the loom, not separate.
  9. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    correct:
    1017024/G - HARNESS,MAIN CABLE - 13500 INR -155.15 EU
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  10. Leyprest

    Leyprest Adventurer

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    I'm aware that one could be bought as part of a complete replacement wiring loom. However the connector will almost certainly be of a generic type and not made specifically for Royal Enfield. So given that, buying a whole replacement loom would seem like an overtly expensive exercise. I'm wondering if anyone knows what type of connector it is and where they can be purchased from.
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  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I agree. I would think that RE buys parts such as this from a third party manufacturer, and it's most likely not made specific just to RE. I know that some of the other plugs they use are indeed just generic plugs although I can't speak for that one. You may want to check Eastern Beaver. They have all sorts of OEM plugs and such.
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  12. Leyprest

    Leyprest Adventurer

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    Upon further investigation it appears to be an MX150 20 Pin Molex Connector. Used in many types of cars and motorcycles. So should be easy to source.
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  13. radare

    radare One part at a time

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    What happened to yours?
  14. Leyprest

    Leyprest Adventurer

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    Some of the wires came loose (probably not crimped in properly at the loom factory that supplies Royal Enfield I'd guess). So before I proceeded to try and fix it, I thought it might be best to found out where to get a replacement connector just in case it got damaged during the process. It's no real big problem though as all I've lost is the gear indicator, the minutes and the am/pm on the display. Very minor things which I can live without as I've never had them on any bike before. Seeing as how they are there I suppose it'd be nice to have them display properly.
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  15. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    I think that you can usually slip a jeweler's screwdriver into the socket and free individual contacts, pull them out and solder them and then push them back in.
  16. Leyprest

    Leyprest Adventurer

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    Yes apparently so. I've ordered a few spare pins just in case some break, or have already broken. Hopefully the repair be a fairly straight forward process.
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  17. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    If it's an Enfield then ithe EFI is good to go. Sid Lal when he was president then CEO of RE made sure the EFI was mapped for and ride tested at the Dead Sea and Khardung La. Some of the other things he insisted on. The EFI for the Bullet had to come from one of the major makers, in this case Keihin. The hydraulic lifters of the Bullet engine had to come from a major makers , in this case Delphi. They guy is a hard core bike nut. This bodes well for Enfield's future and their customers.
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  18. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Look up Eastern Beaver on the web. He gets them from the OEM makers in Japan whos supply the auto and moto makers, he's got ya covered.
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  19. radare

    radare One part at a time

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    You can get de-pinning tools on Amazon for dirt-cheap. They make it really easy to pop connectors apart and fix pins. I think the ones I bought were under $12 for 39 different keys. I bought a set when I had to replace all of the coil connectors on my Audi. On those connectors, each pin had two locking tabs which made them difficult to get apart with a paperclip or needle.

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  20. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

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    A well set up carb on an electric start bike should not be hard to start even in cold weather. Kick start bikes can be. The iridium plug also helps with the cold starts. My garage is sometimes below 0 degC in winter and with the choke out it fires up first thing. I just start her (maybe a warmup of 30s while I put my gloves on) and ride gentle for a km or so. Choke goes in about then too. I keep the choke out if the traffic light catches me in the first km. Luckily the highest I have ridden is probably about 1500m/5000ft and it was fine. In my 40 odd years of car&bike ownership I have never had to do carb repairs. Clean carbs because of dirt or stale fuel yes but never to repair anything. Now on the carb bike the filter is just under the cock to unscrew and clean while on the EFI bike it will be a matter of limping to a mechanic or home. Water in the fuel ---- clean filter and drain carb by undoing the drain valve at the bottom of the carb with the supplied flat screwdriver. EFI --- a walk and recovery.
    But I like the fuel efficiency of EFI.
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