Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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  2. chelmi_ouest_coast

    chelmi_ouest_coast Adventurer

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    Yes, i think the noise i inside this part of the pipe (in the green circle), is the CAT ?

    20200921_102541.jpg
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  3. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    That's the Cat. Going by the picture your bike looks quite newish. If it was older i would just cut it out and weld a bit of tubing instead
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  4. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Or just replace with a Delkevic full system... Sounds much better, and looks much nicer too, IMO. Gets rid of both cats as well. One of the first things I did...
  5. benebob

    benebob Adventurer

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    Plus one on the delkevic pipe. You get rid of the rattle prone heat shields as well as the cat. Got my pipe and 8” oval muffler for like $170 shipped. Not amazing quality but decent enough. Sounds great and no remap. Seems their prices vary and the best i found was on their own website. Only downside with the smaller muffler is water crossing clearance now. I wanted it for big tusk side cases and hope to eventually get someone to run the pipe up and inside of the case above the swingarm
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  6. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    OK Randy, you talked me into it. I just ordered the same Delkevic set as yours. It should be here on Friday. Did your set come with the gasket for the header at the cylinder head?

    I've also got what may be a bit of an issue. The two bolts that hold my OEM header to the cylinder head were overtightened, either by the PO or the factory. It appears that the studs are bent. I won't know how badly until I try to remove the OEM pipe. Are these studs usually threaded into the head?

    Attached Files:

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  7. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yes, mine came with literally everything needed to install, including the exhaust port gasket, the head pipe to muffler joint gasket, and even a small tube of hi-temp RTV.

    I would assume the exhaust studs are like everything else I've ever dealt with, and are just threaded into the head.
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  8. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    Are the studs usually left or right threads?
  9. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    AFAIR they are standard, but it's been a number of years since I've needed to replace a stud. I'd recommend using a good penetrating oil on the nuts a day or two before trying to remove them. You don't want to snap a stud. DAMHIK.

    Skip to around 2:17 in this video:

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  10. benebob

    benebob Adventurer

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    Should just be standard stainless exhaust threads not a reverse thread as one of mine loosened at the head while taking the nut off. Could they have been bent from using the exhaust as bash plate? That could also explain your cat rattle.
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  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    If you're referring to the clutch spring/pressure plate bolts, yes, they need to be bottomed out. My other manuals actually give a torque spec for these but I don't see it in the Himalayan manual. It's not the best manual I've ever seen, for sure! But, the clutch disassembly begins on page 35 and the assembly part begins on page 108 of my Engine service manual. Just looking at the exploded diagram on page 15, it looks like a pretty straightforward motorcycle clutch assembly, although I haven't delved into studying up on it too much...

    EDIT: I take that back. It lists the torque as 10-12Nm on page 109.

    EDIT AGAIN: I guess my post looks totally random... I was replying to someone that just asked about some clutch assembly issues they were having, but it appears that that post vanished. :dunno
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  12. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    No impact on the exhaust. Just appears that the nuts were overtightened. The flange is bent also. I may have to remove one stud just to get the flange off. Depends on how much the studs are bent. I am going to order a new pair of studs. I've got the part number for them.
  13. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    IIRC, now that I'm thinking about it, it seems that mine were tweaked ever so slightly. Just enough to make the flange difficult to pull off. No biggie though, so I left them alone.
  14. Brainburn

    Brainburn Adventurer

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    It was me...

    I thought I messed up and then found the problem but, it still is shit on my end.

    Thanks for the reply man.

    The manual is total dog shit.
  15. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    After posting, I looked at the clutch assembly in a bit more detail... I have to take that back too... It's not quite what I'm accustomed to with other bikes. The offset plate... the Belleville spring and washer... etc... Even the way it comes apart and goes back together seems foreign to me. And with the manual being what it is, I'd have to take one apart in order to get a full grasp of the design, and before I could even begin to make any useful suggestions.

    You've likely already done the first things that come to mind... Check the hub and basket for grooves, completely slacken the cable, and make sure the actuator/lever assembly is functioning correctly. And of course, double check the exploded diagram for the correct parts order. Usually when I have something not behaving correctly, it's something simple that I've overlooked... Usually helps me to take a break and reapproach the problem when I'm not sweating and cussin' :baldy
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  16. Brainburn

    Brainburn Adventurer

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    I had to walk away from it today.

    The manual tells you to use the "special tool" (pg 109) to basically make the collar assembly flush but it didnt work either.

    The exploded view is mis-numbered as well.

    I really appreciate the info but, I am still dead in the water.

    I would be willing to just buy a whole damn clutch assembly at this point. If only there were a spot to purchase in the US that won't take until Dec to get it delivered.

    Aaaargh...

    I will hit it again tomorrow.

    If anyone is local to me, Olympia, WA that wants to get oily, I will certainly make it worth your while.


    Mike
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  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Walking away for a bit is often the best move. :thumb

    I've read through the assembly steps now, and think I understand, although, of course, I don't have the shit sitting on the bench in front of me so...

    The "Special Tool" appears to just compress the pressure plate and springs (by using longer bolts) to allow the first four standard length bolts to engage the threads in the back plate. Once the first four bolts are put in place, the "Special tool" and longer bolts are removed to allow installation of the last two bolts.

    Yep, the numbers of the diagram are off by one.

    The manual's photos don't align well with the descriptions of the steps in some cases. If I'm understanding it correctly, you start with the hub face down like this:

    Engine Service Manual-himalayan.jpg

    Then begin at step 56 on page 108, with the bevel washer placed in the groove with the bevel facing up, followed by the flat washer, then a steel plate, and the first friction plate. Then just follow the steps in order from there, adding plates in order, then the backing plate. Then carefully turn this stack over so you can put the springs and pressure plate on, use the "special tool" to compress the springs, etc, and tighten the six bolts to 10-12Nm. From there, it all looks pretty straight forward. Of course, that's just me imagining it all from various photos and the way it all "works" in my brain. All bets are off in the real world! :lol3 Different from what I'm accustomed to, but after really looking at it and reading through it, I think it makes sense....

    Perhaps, with a fresh eye, you'll get it when you get back to it. Then, you can come back and tell us all how it's done!
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  18. Brainburn

    Brainburn Adventurer

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    Randy,
    Thanks brother.

    I think the flat washer goes first then the bevel washer then steel, friction, etc... (input welcomed). I agree with the special tool use and will correct it when I crack into it again tomorrow.

    I really appreciate it.

    I have repaired 2 other clutches on two other types of bikes and never had a problem. This one is just kicking my ass for whatever reason.
  19. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    I got both studs out. They are both bent, one more than the other. Both studs started turning out with the nuts but the nearest (to me) then jammed against the flange, so had to give it a good soak with penetrating oil and tighten it back up to get it to loosen on the stud. Then, when I got both nuts off, I had to work both the studs to a position where the less bent one would actually turn out.

    There is a shoulder on the studs. I could probably clamp them it in a vice and straighten them. I will see how long it takes to get studs from RE. It is supposed to rain for the next week or so. Delkevic arrives Thursday or Friday.
  20. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Perhaps I'm misinterpreting...

    56. Clutch Plate
    Assembly
    Assemble beveled steel
    washer with the bevel
    facing upwards, in the
    groove in clutch hub


    56. Clutch Plate
    Assembly
    Assemble plain steel
    washer over beveled
    steel washer.


     Assemble 1st steel plate.·
    Assemble 1st friction
    plate with its lugs in line
    with the lugs on the
    clutch hub, to locate in
    the clutch housing.

     Assemble the balance
    steel plates & friction
    plates on the clutch hub
    ensuring the lugs of the
    friction plate are in a
    straight line and
    between the lugs of the
    clutch hub.

     Assemble clutch back
    plate assembly over the
    clutch plates, with its
    lugs passing through
    the holes in the clutch
    hub.

     Carefully turn the
    assembly over to install
    the springs & pressure
    plate.

     Compress springs &
    pressure plate by fixing
    2 long Hex bolts & special
    tool to the clutch back
    plate assembly.

     Locate 4 Hex flange bolts
    and tighten evenly.

     Remove the 2 long Hex
    bolts & special tool & fix
    the balance 2 Hex flange
    bolts.