Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    Randy, I could be wrong and I haven't checked but it wouldn't surprise me if it was originally intended to use the kick start parts from the EFI 500.
    A few of us should probably collaborate to find out. I have parts books and can get parts. Somebody handy and good would be needed to drill, ream and bush the cases for a kicker shaft and somebody needs to volunteer a bike to do it to.
    Doctor T and CaptainTrips like this.
  2. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    In AUS they did sell the carb version which we call BS3. That pipe should do nicely. and its a bit cheaper too (not much).
  3. Robotaz

    Robotaz Adrenalin Freak

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    Ugh. After breaking down in my pickup on the interstate, then being dead in the middle of the Ohio River, I will never trust a vinyl gear. Never. That stuff does not belong in an engine, ever.
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  4. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

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    Some consider that we got a carbed BS4 , if that is possible.

    Having a set of Anakee Adventures fitted tomorrow, and a set of HD tubes as existing are still the OEM at 31,000 km, and the cost won't be far short of the cost of Delcovic system, so we all decide what we spend our hard earned on!
  5. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    yeah, possible, in terms of updates and improvements - but semantics in this case, the point is to get revision A of the part - afaik only that is without all the "extras" you do not want. Current revision is E
  6. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    I recently bought a BS3 2016 Hima (one of the first, it is listed as Bullet 350cc in the papers) with 60 tkm (I got it for 800US$) and after we changed the entire front, t-stem, fork, brake from 535 and new tyres the bike still wobbled in curves. New swingarm did not remove that, only after we exchanged this part the bike ran like new. Just in case you guys get up to that km range.
    0002.jpg 0001.jpg
  7. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Possibly. If that's the case, that should be something that Sam's people could do. With the proper dimensions, location, etc, any machine shop could bore the side cover. If all of the parts for the Bullet (or other model) work, I would assume the oil seal would as well...

    @sam2019 ??
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  8. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

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    Some BMWs flat twins have a kickstart, some don't.
    The gear is always fitted to the end of the gearbox input shaft, so just just a cover with a hole and a pedal with a quadrant and you are good to go.
    My G/S and GS have one, but I have never used either, as the pedal kicks out from the bike and my leg just doesn't move that way.
    Main reason they were fitted seemed to be to let BMW claim a low weight for the first bikes which were reputedly available without the huge 30 AH battery and heavy Bosch auto style starter.
    Whether or not any were ever sold without the electric starter is debatable, but folks were still quoting the weight without them years later.
    And the kickstart hole in mine has neither a bush or a seal!
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  9. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    I lost you here, what are you talking about? the kickstart? if so its unlikely any Bullet parts other than the outside arm would fit.
  10. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah, I was responding to Eatmore's post above mine, where he speculated about the possibility of the Himalayan being designed to accept the kick start parts from another model...

    In the case of the TW and XT, the TW originally came with a kick start, but it was deleted in 2001. The XT225 never came with a kick start, but all of the internal parts of the kick start kit offered by Yamaha are the same as those used on the TW. And all of those parts were also used in another model from back in the 80's... I did quite a bit of research when I was trying to piece together the kits for the two bikes. It's not at all uncommon for a manufacturer to avoid reinventing the wheel in some cases, and just design around some existing parts from previous models. I guess that was sort of Eatmore's thought process. But having absolutely NO experience with earlier RE models, I have no idea. Just figured that you would be the guy with the knowledge on such subjects... I still find it curious that RE would design the engine to use a kick start, and not design the internal parts to make that happen... BUT, if it was designed to utilize existing internal parts...
  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I was aware that some of the earlier boxers had kick starts, although I've never ridden one. I just assumed they had them as so many bikes back in the day did... because bikes were "supposed" to have them...

    I've seen videos of people using them and while it seems foreign to me, what I've seen done was the rider would stand off to the side of the bike and facing it. Then lift the leg forward to engage the kick start lever and push down. Definitely not what I'm accustomed to growing up riding Japanese bikes.

    The kick start on my KTM is on the left side and is weird for me to use in the conventional manner as well. I've seen others using it in a similar manner to the BMW, by standing beside the bike, rather than on it... I tried that but wasn't so successful, and just learned to use my left leg while straddling the bike. Still awkward, but I guess it's all about what one is used to. I've done it a few times just to see that I could but it always felt awkward to do it...
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  12. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    I would assume that the Ls410 went thru various design stages. In the early days the engineers may have kept the kickstart option open in the tooling for the engine body, later that was cancelled but the tooling was done and the mods for the kick did not disturb the rest of the design so they left it.
    If you look at the UCE engine and the LS410 you will see that there is no way the kick from UCE would fit the 410. The design is too different. I have often used parts from RE models other than the Hima for the Hima, e.g. the front brake and the windshield from the 650, lamp holders from the thunderbird and even the 500cc piston from the bullet in the early 477cc design phases. But there are limits :-)
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  13. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah, I'm sure you're correct about the design phases for the engine. And as you say, once the casting molds and tooling was done, it's cost prohibitive to redo them when the extra castings do no harm. And you know the designs of each much better than me... I can't say that I've ever even SEEN any RE other than the Himalayan, the newer 650's and a couple of Classics.

    I guess I was thinking about something like this...




    Although, I've never seen inside one of these engines.
  14. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    that is the Unit Construction Engine UCE, all modern Bullets since 2008 are based on this 350, 500 and 535cc.
    as I said, very different from the LS410
    a kick for the Hima would have to be constructed from scratch and that is expensive, a set then would cost upwards of 600 US$ would be my guess assuming at least 200 are sold.
    A company like Hitchcock could maybe stem such a thing. No we. too small :-)
  15. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I'll admit that I cringed a little when I opened up the TW and saw the vinyl oil pump gear. Then again, it's quite common in motorcycles and I've seen it in quite a few others. Never had an issue with them either. The Himalayan has no vinyl gears as far as I can tell, although the older UCE engines did.

    I wouldn't think that so many manufacturers would use them just to save the money over a steel counterpart. I'm guessing there's a reason for the vinyl gears. :dunno

    So, does anyone know of a mechanical advantage that the vinyl gears may have over a steel one??
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  16. benebob

    benebob Adventurer

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    Starting to get some cool mornings so I guess it is about time to start thinking about heated grips for the Himalayan. My tiger has stock ones as you can get em quite cheap of you look (now on the 3rd pair) plus they plug and play easy. Have used hotgrips in the past and liked em but they seem to be defunct or at least their website is defunct. Only ones I am seeing are oxfords and bikemasters. Both seem quite clunky/cheaply made and big in the controls. What are all the cold weather riders using these days.
  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yep, was 48 degrees here this morning! A little cooler than normal for September for around these parts.

    Heated grips are ok. But, my preference is heated gloves as they put the heat where it's needed most, on the BACKS of your hand where the wind is. Not as cheap as grips for sure, but much more effective, IME. I will add the caveat that I suffer from hands that are very sensitive to cold, so YMMV. Either way, I use a Warm N Safe heated jacket liner and a pair of their gloves, along with one of their dual channel remote Heattrollers, in the cooler months. One set covers whichever bike I decide to ride by just plugging the jacket lead into the bike's charging system. Been using some version of heated vest/jacket liner, or another, for years. But added the gloves a couple of years back, and can't even imagine doing without them now...

    Of course, as I said, the full setup ain't cheap. But, the comfort I feel using it is worth EVERY penny and then some! Riding around as comfortable as if I were on my sofa swaddled in an electric blanket, while cagers are gawking at me like I'm an idiot.... And the incredulous remarks and questions you get when you stop somewhere... PRICELESS! :D

    Of course, that was back when I rode bigger bikes with plenty of charging capacity. Now that I've started enjoying the smaller bikes, I'll have to closely monitor things to make sure if the little bikes can handle the load...

    My hope is that by going to an LED headlight and tail light, I've freed up enough juice to at least run the Heattroller at 50% duty cycle, which is about as high as I typically need to anyway.
  18. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    I've put Oxfords on all my bikes in the past 10 years including my Hima. They work and have not had any failures. Currently my oldest set is 6 years.

    Heated gloves are OK but you don't always carry heated gloves. Mountain passes can be a surprise even in the hottest weather.
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  19. benebob

    benebob Adventurer

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    Personally not a fan of nanny heated clothes they creep me out just like a heated car seat. I have proper riding clothes that allow for about an hour at 75 plus around 15 degrees at night I simply like wearing thinner gloves around town which means heated grips. What are all y’all using?
  20. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    Randy what did you do with the O2 sensor when you mounted your Delkevic?