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Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    Found the 25A main fuse was blown. Pulled the fuse for the pump. Finished installing the battery, tried to put in another main fuse and it blew before I got it in...Crapola.
  2. HaveACuppaTea

    HaveACuppaTea Adventurer

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    Yes. It needs to be compression TDC.
    Worth noting that if you rotate the engine by the magneto rotor nut clockwise, as suggested by the manual, you are turning the engine backwards.
    sqeeezy likes this.
  3. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    Yeah and noticed that it makes an awful noise too if you turn it clockwise.
  4. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    Oops, not the main fuse, the charging fuse, not main fuse. I can't find that I did any damage when pulling and replacing the battery, although moving things around was a B.
  5. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

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    that's why I stick it in 4th and rotate the engine using the back wheel in forward rotation, it kinda goes against the grain turning the engine backwards..
  6. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    Once I realized that the manual is backwards (there is also a direction arrow on the flywheel) I just reversed my ratchet. But I really need to have it in gear as it is very difficult to get it to stop without going past the T mark.

    Now, I have broken the cheapo tappet adjuster that I bought off eBay. I need to bend the handle to get enough clearance. Since it already had an S bend in it, I just took a hammer to one bend to give me the angle I wanted. Alas, the head just popped off the handle, even though I had not touched it with the hammer. Now I have a little welding job...
  7. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    Looking at the wiring diagram....what is the RR unit? Is that the regulator/rectifier?
  8. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I followed the manual the first time I checked the valves, but did it the "right" way the second time... Then a few weeks ago, I ran across a video on this very subject. So, while the video is concerning the 650 twins rather than the Himalayan, it appears that the confusion is the same... It appears that Dorman Dairies created quite a stir when he posted a valve adjustment video using the method given in the manual. As a result, he contacted Royal Enfield's technical center for clarification. He reads their response in the following video...




    So, it appears that even RE admits that the manual is incorrect.

    I didn't see an arrow on mine. But then again, my TDC marking isn't as it appears in the manual either. :dunno

    On the subject of having better control of the flywheel, I'd suggest not using a ratchet, and using a breaker bar, T-Handle, or some other tool that allows control of the socket in both directions. On the Himalayan, due to clearance with my engine bars, I find the easiest way is to use one of these little doo-dads for the socket, then use a box wrench to turn the flywheel...


    IMG_9995.JPG
    Doctor T likes this.
  9. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    As it is connected to the "magneto" and then goes through the fuse box to the positive side of the battery... And there is also a note stating that Fuse 1 is "Charging Fuse - 30A (RR Unit)"... Yes that would be the regulator/rectifier.
  10. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    For you trouble shooters out there..

    Went out to ride the Himma yesterday, been a few weeks, no start, wouldn't even light the instrument panel. Based on this thread, I assumed bad battery. I have had sudden battery failure on other bikes. When I pulled the battery, it showed 3 volts. I took it to the dealer and got a Yuasa replacement.

    Started install of the battery, what a PITA. Had to modify the lugs on the cables to get them to fit. As I started to attach the ground cable, the ABS pump started. EVerytime I touched the negative terminal, the pump started and wouldn't stop. I turned the key, and nothing. Nothing at the instrument panel.

    I started checking things and noted that the 25 amp charging fuse was blown. I tried to replace the fuse, but it blew as soon as it touched.

    I plan to do the following.

    1 - Disconnect all of the electrical accessories that I've added.

    2 - Pull all of the fuses but the charging fuse and try that one.

    3 - Replace fuses one at a time to try to somewhat isolate the problem.

    4 - Try to start continuity testing. Small space and rats nest of wires, I see that as a frustrating task.

    5 - the pump running seems to be a clue, but I don't see it. I did find a post elsewhere that the pump running may be a failed pump relay. (common on some BMW's) Not sure how that would play in to blowing the fuse.

    Any thoughts or suggestions?
  11. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    Why might that one blow?
  12. CarstenB

    CarstenB Been here awhile

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    you're running the risk to loosen the nut when you turn it counter-clockwise. Those have a history of coming loose anyways hence the recommendation to turn it clockwise. It you loosen or take out the spark plug it's fairly easy to rotate the crank.
  13. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    First things first... Your question is a good one. I would begin by testing the stator, then the reg/rec. If those both pass, follow the wiring diagram to check, one by one, anything else connected by that circuit.
  14. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    thanks
  15. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    I just got back from buying one of those sliding T-bar/breaker socket drivers for just this reason. :)
    Randy likes this.
  16. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yeah, when I first read the manual I was like, "What? Spin the engine backwards?!" I believe that's the first bike I've ever done that on as on everything else, conventional wisdom has always been to spin the engine in it's normal direction when finding TDC for valve adjustments. It seems that I remember many years ago learning that it was inadvisable to spin the cam backwards due to the cam chain tensioner, and something to do with the slack in the cam chain not positioning the cam in the correct position when turned backwards.

    I followed the manual the first time. And then, the second time, I second guessed the manual and did it the conventional way. Or maybe it was vice versa, I forget... Either way, I reasoned that since the flywheel nut is torqued to 70-80Nm, that the slight torque required to turn the engine over would do one of two things; absolutely nothing, or show me that my flywheel nut was loose...

    And then, much more recently, Dorman Diaries posted the video I linked to above. And it appears that RE tech dept. actually advised him to turn the engine over in the way it normally spins... So, :dunno

    But, having done it both ways, and having the head cover off for a good look at things while retorquing my head, in the case of the Himalayan's cam arrangement, I really don't think it matters in terms of positioning the cam correctly. In fact, with the profile of the cam, it didn't appear that you really even had to be spot on at TDC as a few degrees off in either direction made no difference in the follower position.

    So, now that I see no harm in following the manual, in the future I'll likely just turn it clockwise as it says...
  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Update:

    In light of Dorman Diaries' video, in which he posed the question to RE and received a "definitive" reply, I just emailed RENA explaining the controversy and asking for clarification on the subject. When and if I get a response, I'll post it here...
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  18. pineygroveshop

    pineygroveshop Adventurer

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    Compression.
  19. radare

    radare One part at a time

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    I don’t understand why everyone worries so much about TDC and which stroke it’s on when doing valve adjustments. You just want the cam positioned so that the rockers aren’t on a cam lobe. That happens something like 270-degrees of revolution for each cam (I don’t know the exact duration for the Hima’s cam). If you rotate the engine, you can see the action of the rocker. When it’s not being lifted by the cam lobe, check the clearance. Do this a couple times each valve to be sure, then set the lash and call it done. I don’t even bother with rotating the crank with a wrench. Like others have said, put it in a high gear and turn the back wheel.
    headonz likes this.
  20. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    Yeah, as I said, this is my first experience with a single. With a multi like my Tiger Explorer, all the stars have to be aligned correctly to get it right. But then you have the reference marks on the cam sprockets to refer to.