Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    On this side of the pond, Dennis Kirk sells what appears to be the same item, JT Sprockets 525 clip-style master link, for $3.28 (£2.55 at current exchange rate). Unfortunately, they want $8 in shipping, and the cheapest shipping option is two-day!
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  2. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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  3. GeeMan67

    GeeMan67 Adventurer

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    To be honest, I can't see putting that on my bike. Looks like adding a ton of weight and I would hate to go down and whack my knees into it. That's just me though, YMMV.

    And the videos of the guy welding and using an angle grinder in flip flops is over the top. No OSHA concerns in India I see.
  4. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    Its 5 KG with 3 ribs, somewhat less with 2 I guess. Considering my 110KG body it really does not matter :)
    I guess OSHA is workplace safety? nope. zero here. I had to basically blackmail the local RE dealership to install air vents in the basement repair shop, these guys where working with running engines in a more or less confined space ...

    regarding your knees, I can tell you with confidence that we had 2 incidents with GIVI look alike crashbars (Zana), both from slow speed and mangled shins & feet. No such result whenever these one where installed. These (and hard boxes) always created enough room from under the fallen bike for the leg to be pulled out safely.
  5. RCruiser

    RCruiser Jus' Watchin'

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    No to any of them Sam. I can't stand seeing these things all over the place in India. People think that they actually need them because everybody else has them, I guess, but how often do people go down the road bashing each other?! They're certainly not for 'off road purposes' (though if you think so, & are good with 5kgs, who am I to argue? ) More critically though, it's just a 2 point mount which usually folds like a wet noodle when 'tested'.
    We used to call these Damage Multipliers when SUV's started sporting them; they were just bling really, posing like a Real 4X4, but these add-ons would actually create more/different damage than if there had been nothing!
    The Zana & Givi are 3 Point Engine Guards, not Leg Guards...
    My 2 cents since you asked...
  6. OzRider64

    OzRider64 Friggen slow Adventurer.

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  7. MitchMan

    MitchMan Adventurer

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    Does anyone know when the Euro 5 Himalayan with switchable ABS will be available in the UK/Europe?

    MitchMan
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  8. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    well, yeah, I asked :)
    first: zana and givi IMO are pointless, they may be engine guards but there is not much to guard in terms of the engine when you fall. at the most the exhaust but thats not covered by either of them. they are 100% good looking good-for-nothings. And I speak out of experience. so far so bad, now to our design (ok, our ADAPTED design):
    1) hair needle curve, 180 degrees uphill, I tried to overtake a truck on the inside, bike stalls and on sideways inclined road tumbles, my leg stuck under the frame, gas starts dripping off of the carb. - truck driver stops, lifts the bike, all OK but this could have ended badly. (bike had fancy "engine protection" and soft bags)
    2) gravel road downhill fairly steep, slow in first gear, truck comes up and suddenly wobbels towards me, I panic, I apply full front brake, bike slides then falls to the left, leg under frame but leg guard (and rear boxes) allow for room to pull it out
    3) 100m off of the top of Rohtang (4500m) on my way up from the north side. deep mud across the track which is too narrow for 2 trucks, one heads down in the middle of the tracks towards me, I turn to the right side (where a steep incline about 300m awaits) and stop the bike just short of it, loose control, bike falls to the left, I am under it but again, enough space to free myself before the truck rushes past me.
    I could go on. If you ride in those areas every year these things happen (and worse, like in a riverbed) - but of course if you do less challenging trips then this may look like a bit of overkill. the weight issue is ridiculous, the Givi is half the weight but who cares, 2KG is just the lunch I had :-)
    just my 2 cents with a bit of experience added as flavor.
  9. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

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    Yes. I quote. In 2009 the Federation of European Motorcyclists Federation Associations (FEMA) in its, “A European Agenda for Motorcycle Safety – The Motorcyclists’ Point of View ” stated, “The design of motorcycles has made them increasingly more proficient and specialised and generally reflects a greater emphasis on safety. Because motorcyclists are usually separated from the motorcycle at some time during a crash, protective equipment attached to the motorcycle, e.g. so called “leg protectors” or airbags, is less likely to be effective than protective clothing and should not warrant serious attention.” That makes 4 cents, still not enough for ek kop chai...
  10. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    "usually" being the operative term here. you usually crash on black top with high(er) speeds. However on those 0.01% of the world roads that I (also) drive you just fall - with the bike- and then protective gear is somewhat helpful but the main job is not to get squashed by the iron. I don't have leg (or "engine") protectors on my street Himas, only on those that I drive in heavy terrain, mud, ice and deep waters .. you get the picture
    if not, here it is:

    bike for heavy duty mountain terrain

    002.jpg

    bike for highway & city use:

    x1.jpg
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  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Gotta agree with Sam on this one. The safety data is more relevant to street crashes rather than off-road. Mild topple over types of things happen quite a bit in rough terrain off-road, so POTENTIALLY, I could see an advantage to something that MAY help protect the lower legs from crush injuries or becoming trapped under the machine. With that said, I have ZANA bars on my bike. And while I haven't dropped the bike YET (KNOCK WOOD!), I doubt they'd do anything to protect against such a thing. I bought them mainly to protect the engine. And while I've sure it's not needed on flatter terrain, and may not offer any benefit at all, I often ride in very irregular and rocky terrain where I worry a bit more about something hard protruding from the surface (boulder) getting in and damaging my cases or oil cooler in a drop.

    And while anything can happen to anyone at any time, I feel that in many cases, when someone gets a leg caught under a bike, they were trying to save it too late in the game, and would have fared better had they distanced themselves from the machine sooner. Sometimes, when the crash is inevitable, it's advisable to get away from the machine. Shit still sometimes happens though.

    And while I'll admit that I knowingly sacrifice protection for other considerations, there is a lot of truth from everide's video on appropriate boots for off-road riding... Since I gave up riding dedicated dirt bikes a few years ago, I don't follow his advice, but I can't fault it either...






    On the subject of hard bags, I'm of mixed opinions...

    On the one hand, the hard bags can help as Sam mentioned. They also can make the bike easier to pick up since they tend to hold a downed bike at more of an upright angle. On the other hand, lots of leg injuries have been caused BY hard luggage off-road. It's pretty common for a dab to end up taking your leg back so that it gets trapped and ran over by the bag. For this reason, while I prefer hard bags for convenience, I prefer soft bags for safety when doing any real off-road. And I have both types.
  12. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    Was meant to be in the summer but due to the virus and staff staying at home I was informed it will be sometime next year. Mines a 2019 and i fitted my own switch to turn off the ABS. A simple 20-minute job. Only have to run 2 wires to the fuse box.

    SAM
    Those engine guards are mighty Fugley. As i do a lot of off road i won't be fitting any guards as they just get caught in the deep ruts. To be honest, does the Himayalan really need guards? It's not like the engine cases stick out. My past time is falling off a lot off road and the cases have never been scratch or damaged. One thing i do like about them is they are 2 mounting points instead of 3 like GIVI ones. 2 point bars are meant to bend in an accident. Where 3 point bars in a heavy crash may bend the bike frame as there is no flex to the crash bars. I saw the tests at TUV Berkshire many years ago. We were asked to design engine/Crash bars for British Army motorbikes. In the end, the Army scrapped the idea as they decided to cut back on Motorbikes.
  13. sqeeezy

    sqeeezy Been here awhile

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    Fair enough Sam, I've never had them on a bike so my opinion is based on a) the fact that when I've dropped the Himmie, I've not ended up with my leg underneath (~ so far ~) and I've not had any damage to the engine, and b) in the UK, some years back, there was considerable opposition to a government move to introduce compulsory leg guards (or leg crushers, depending on your point of view). I guess the first time I get a leg stuck under the bike might be enough to change my mind.
  14. benebob

    benebob Adventurer

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    Got around to measuring and adjusting my TPS today trying to chase down the blasted shutting off while coming to a stop until warmed up. Seems mine is set at .32v and will not go up past .42 volts when attempting to adjust it at idle. Anybody else experience this. I did max it out to .42v and road around a bit. Still drops the idle down to about 1000rpm then if you sit there it will just increase up to about 1600 with it at .42v, went back to .32v. Even used two different multimeters to measure it. Any thoughts?
  15. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Ya know? I've never even checked my TPS voltage. Don't have any issues with running, but now, I'm curious... What is the generally accepted "sweet spot" for the TPS? And which way does it work? Does the voltage go up with butterfly opening, or down? Is it safe to assume that at idle, the signal from the TPS causes the ECU to add fuel to the mixture as the voltage is increased (or decreased) or exactly what is the change in the setting actually doing? And if this is the case, does the lambda sensor not "undo" this when it senses a richer idle mixture in closed loop?

    Is it better to check with the ignition on and the engine running, or not running?

    I may have to check mine sometime just out of curiosity...

    Carbs I understand, but all the sensors associated with EFI still baffles me sometimes...
  16. benebob

    benebob Adventurer

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    Well from what I've read it seems that .60v plus or minus .02 is what is recommended. Then again, I can't even get close. :) It was the same running or nut running for me, checked with 2 different meters with the same results. Pretty simple. Shove a paperclip into the blue/red wire on the tps plug. for the positive, neg goes to the battery and turn the ignition on.
  17. CaptainTrips

    CaptainTrips Been here awhile

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    Did a couple of hundred miles on the bike yesterday and today with the Delkevic system. Quite pleased with the results. The fueling is nearly perfect now. I can put the bike in gear and let it idle at 1200 rpm with the clutch out and it will just tractor along as smoothly as can be. Sounds good too.
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  18. rockt

    rockt Long timer

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    How's it sound compared to stock?
  19. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    I am talking slow-mo falling, not "crashing" in the usual sense. getting away from the bike is impossible (for me) - not flexible enough (age) and shitloads of luggage on the bike so gracefuly swinging my leg over the rear is out of the question, basically I am doomed to fall WITH the bike when this happens - leg always stuck under the bike.

    the Givi type (and Zana) are making it worse as they extend to the footrest and the leg WILL be crushed when this happens - by the "guard". I'd rather have my engine damaged than my leg.
    We just recently had this happen with one of our bikes with a Zana guard. was a 17.000 INR repair in spite of the guard which guarded nothing but injured the foot of the (young) driver.

    Hard boxes that are mounted relatively low are helpful as well. its hard to estimate which is more helpful of those. I'd say the leg guards but the boxes definitely play a role.
    Anyone having watched my Ladakh clips on YT will know there is no underbrush, roots or anything of the kind, just sand, gravel, cobblestones , waterfalls and deep holes in the occasional blacktop. nothing anything can get "caught" in.

    Oh yes, and boots, you want the best, and the highest, above the water line :-)

    I actually wrap plastic bags around them before crossing a long water stretch and pray I do not have to step off the footrest while crossing. driving with ice cold feet is hell.
  20. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    It's really difficult to quantify or qualify sound of an exhaust in a video. But here's a short clip I did when I first installed mine. Of course, this is inside my garage and not actually running down the road and out in the open. So, it's not really accurate, but gives something of a comparison since they were all shot from the same relative camera position.

    Stock RE exhaust, Delkevic with standard baffle, Delkevic with the option USFS approved spark arrestor, and Delkevic with no baffle...



    I run it without the baffle and love the sound. Not loud at all but has a much deeper, richer tone.