Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    Thanks for that info.

    I'm evaluating/deciding if I should get the set Concepts tall seat or take the risk on a RE Classic touring seat.

    Either seat will require modification to suite my bike and I'm working a comparison drawing to help me make this decision!
  2. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    Yes.
  3. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    I've tried Seat Concepts, regular seat, touring seat, Purple pad, sheep skin, Air Hawk pad. None of these get me past an hour on the motorcycle. Ordered a Russell Sport saddle today. Build date should be in January.
    kitkat likes this.
  4. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    You guys are tempting me to try the Booster Plug. I was already considering it, or at least rethinking the possibility... But, then TEC put out that teaser about a new cam... So, I decided to hold off until I learned more about the cam (if it needed a different fuel map primarily), and decided if I may want to give it a try. But then, I started thinking... I may or may not decide to add a cam, and even if I do, It'll likely be a while since I'd like some first hand reports on its affects before committing... So... Do I want to wait and see, or go ahead and try the Booster Plug? I mean, I may never get the cam. And even if I do, it won't be right away. So, why not enjoy the purported benefits of the BP in the meantime? But, then again, it's not exactly pocket change so didn't want to waste money on the BP just to later discover that I wanted the cam, and that it needed something more, like a PC/PT...

    So, I asked... This is the reply I just received:

    "Hi we got to 30BHP on stock ECU and map, but added a boosterplug to improve throttle response, so no expensive tuner needed."

    So evidently the bike in the video has the cam and BP installed. In that case, there's really no reason to wait until I make the decision about the cam.

    Still can't say that the BP will be worth the money to me, but you guys are convincing me, And now that the cam situation is removed from the decision making process, I'm becoming more inclined to give one a try and see.

    The best price I've seen on the BP is Hitchcock's. The shipping pretty much evens it out and brings it back close to the standard MSRP price. But, as there are a couple other items that I wouldn't mind ordering from Hitchcock's anyway, the shipping costs gets sort of spread out, making the BP itself a bit cheaper and less of a gamble just to see if it makes a difference.

    :hmmmmm
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  5. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I have an Air Hawk. The ex loved it on the pillion seat of the GS. I've used an Alaskan Leather sheep skin on the GS for years and find it improved the stock seat well enough for me (on that bike).

    What is the difference between the touring and stock Himalayan seats? It seems that some say they are better, and others say they're not.

    I guess all the years of riding bikes with supposedly bad seats (GS, Ducati, etc.), I've killed the nerves in my bony ass or something. I'm not sure what the longest I've ridden the Himalayan in a stretch but I know that I've put in several days that were around 9-12 hours and 5-6 is a sorta short ride. With the stock seat, and with no discomfort worth talking about. It's not perfect, and I've toyed with the idea of trying the touring seat, or maybe the SC seat. I mean more comfort is better, right? But then, every time I come back to the same thing.... Do I really want to spend the money on a "better" seat if I have no major complaints with the stock one? If I found a good deal on one or the other I may give them a try. But the jury is still out on whether I want to spend the $$$.
  6. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    The Russell Day Long is what led me to look at the seat from the Classic. I first looked at HD police seats but I believe they are too long. They would be a good option if we can make them fit because it would essentially be a cheap Russell Day Long!

    My brother has a Police Harley and promised to take some detailed measurements as it's still my first choice because they are pretty cheap to buy.

    The Classic touring seat is a possibility. I took some snips, traced my factory seat, scanned it at 1:1 scaled and this is what I got:
    upload_2020-10-22_13-47-42.png

    upload_2020-10-22_13-49-8.png

    Touring seat superimposed onto factory seat tracing,
    upload_2020-10-22_13-49-33.png

    And it would need to fit somewhere between the factory seat limits, These are scaled as best I can do without having the touring seat in my possession! My factory seat has already been customized but maintains the factory width which I'm finding puts pressure on my sit bones. A wider seat is what I want!
    upload_2020-10-22_13-51-32.png
    sam2019 likes this.
  7. slownold

    slownold Adventurer

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    Why would the Seat Concepts saddle require modification? It's designed and made for the Himalayan.
  8. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    I think saddles are very personal. I have a Seat Concepts on my NC700X and have done many 500+ mile days on her. I did 16 days In a row averaging 400+ miles per day.
    I put a Seat Concepts on my DR650 and did many long days. The Himma just doesn’t fit me. Hopefully, the DL will fix the problem.
  9. slownold

    slownold Adventurer

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    I took kitkat's post as meaning he'd have to modify the saddle to make it fit the bike.
    I agree that saddles can be very personal, which is why people make money selling replacements.
    I cheated, I just went to my sheepskin products shop and bought an offcut for $15
  10. RaZed1

    RaZed1 Adventurer

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    I'd be curious about a warmer cam for this engine. I put a Web Cam in my TW200 and it made a surprising difference, even with stock bore. Definitely "opened up" the upper rev range, was easy to install, and being just a little 2 lober, was relatively inexpensive (want to say like $120 or so). On that bike, it ran perfectly fine with the jetting that was in it, but being it revved up a bit more, I found going up 1 size on the main seemed to help it a bit. But I wouldn't have said that was strictly necessary, it ran totally fine after just dropping the cam in.
  11. slownold

    slownold Adventurer

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    Not so much a 'warmer' cam, but a British outfit (TEC) are supposedly about to release a cam that reverses some of the compromises made to meet Euro4 emissions with a resulting 20% increase in power.
  12. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I'd say that in a nutshell, it is a warmer cam. The stock cam is just "cold", as you say, to meet stringent emissions requirements. They actually did make a comment that this wasn't a "performance cam" but was instead just the cam that the engine should have come with from the factory. Semantics really... But, I guess the implication is that the parameters aren't "radical" and the valve train's life expectancy shouldn't suffer the way it could from a truly "hot" cam profile.

    I can see that on a carb'd bike the difference in the cam wouldn't require a huge fuel metering difference, because a carb is more or less a self adjusting metering device in and of itself. To a degree anyway. If a new cam allows for more air pumping efficiency the engine is breathing deeper with each intake stroke. More air through a carb means lower pressure and more fuel pulled in with each intake stroke along with more air. Obviously this an oversimplification and one with serious limits, but still...

    With EFI, the fuel is controlled by the ECU's fuel maps. So, with each intake stroke the injector is opened for a specific duration and allows X amount of fuel to be delivered into the airstream. Improve breathing and more air is pulled through the TB. But, the duration of the injector, and amount of fuel, is still governed by the fuel map. With a given air temp, throttle position, RPM, etc, the duration of the injector is what it is. You could double the amount of air sucked through, but unless something tells the ECU to increase the injector duration, you'll still get the original fuel "squirt".

    Yeah, I know that's the simplistic view of the two systems, and there are other factors at play as well. Like the fact that the ECU fuel maps aren't just s strict one way only sort of thing. Obviously, during closed loop the Lambda sensor has predominant control over the fueling, so I would expect the ECU to make adjustments to the increased airflow in order the maintain the correct ratio. But, in open loop, the ECU doesn't have that direct feedback loop and must rely on preprogrammed mapping.... and other sensors... That's why we have so many sensors.... to allow the ECU to access the correct cells in the fuel maps that correlate with the supplied combination of sensor inputs.

    When I first started considering the cam I wondered if the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor would allow for the ECU to compensate for the stronger intake charge (air), and provide more fuel in order to keep the mixture ratio in the ballpark. Perhaps it does... Maybe the MAP sensor helps the EFI respond similarly to the carb in this respect? Or maybe my logic is flawed... :dunno

    Either way, it appears that a more advanced fuel control piggyback system isn't required for the TEC cam to do it's thing. Not to say that the PC/PT devices wouldn't bring their own set of advantages, just that it isn't necessarily a requirement when installing the cam. This is sort of a big deal for me because, while I know many don't mind the more complex systems, and some others actually enjoy it, I just prefer to not deal with the added expense and complexity of downloading, updating, tweaking fuel maps, etc. And I guess it could be a big deal to TEC too because it means, that for people like me, the cost of the cam is the total cost of the upgrade and buyers don't have to also add another ~$300 for a controller device.

    I'm still considering the cam when I get more info on the actual real world affects. But at least now the later cam decision doesn't influence my decision making process on whether or not I want to spring for a BP.
  13. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

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    I find the stock seat acceptable, but like Randy my butt has had a few years to toughen up. Or my head has dumbed down!

    Hitchcocks have a few single seats in their specials section, no fittings which you probably wouldn't have used anyway, but the price is right.

    There are also cover kits by Sahara on Amazon, and similar but unbranded kits on Ebay for around $25-.
    Only ribbed ones seem to be around right now , I bought a smooth one before they sold out and was pleasantly surprised with the quality.
    They are foam lined and and have pull cord laced into the perimeter which makes stretching them on easy.
    My first aim was to reduce the step between the rider and passenger seat, like the TEC guy suggested in his VID and they are perfect for this - just unpicked the old cover, a decent slice with a carving knife , slip the cover on and pull up the lace and it is fine, might glue or staple it later but my current staple gun does not go down between he fins on the seat base.

    Haven't decided how to approach the front yet so just slipped the cover over the existing, as a trial.
    The foam lining on the cover seems to have made it a little more comfortable, but the lace cord does not work as well with the base as it does at the rear, and the fit is not quite there.
    if I decide to reshape the front I will will of course remove the existing cover and glue on a few layers of different density foam, before stretching and stapling the new cover on, but so far I am quite pleased with the result for the modest outlay.
  14. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    :lol3

    Good point! Not sure if my ass is tough, or if my head has just dumbed down as I've gotten accustomed to accepting that my motorcycles aren't my easy chair. Sort of reminds me of one of Stuart Fillingham's videos I watched recently where he comments on his thoughts of getting used to riding naked bikes as opposed to bikes with fairings. His thoughts on that subject struck a chord with me as my observations have been similar.

    But, in all seriousness, I agree that seat comfort is a VERY subjective thing. So, I'm not sure if my ass is tough, or if I'm just somehow more tolerant, or if maybe whoever designs seats also has a scrawny little bony ass like mine, so they think it's fine, and I'm ok with them too... Of course, I guess that if I ever spent the $$$ on a high end custom seat like a Russell, I may kick my own little scrawny ass for not buying one sooner...

    With that said, I wouldn't mind if the Himalayan seat had more fore/aft room as the rear portion doesn't allow much change in position while riding. I don't want to add height, but if the profile was flatter rather than having the step before meeting the rear, it would feel better to me. But, I guess that's one of the compromises of maintaining the low seat height without limiting ground clearance or reducing suspension travel too much. And that low seat height is one of the things that I REALLY appreciate about this bike and that for me, being a short ass, makes this bike so special and unusual among today's offerings in bikes of this type.
  15. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    My bike has a pillion box in place of the pillion pad which eliminates the need for the slope at the back of the factory seat. Seat concepts seat keeps the slope which I don't want so I'd need to modify it.

    Seat concepts seat also slopes to the front. Others who bought have posted complaints about it sloping so again, I'd need to modify it.

    I modified my factory seat about a year ago and I now know exactly what I want. I asked seat concepts if the can make what I want and they said no. They'd need to make another mold just for my request.

    I want a seat that's wider, level front to back, and positioned for my height (I'm 6' 2"). No one offers that!
  16. kitkat

    kitkat Been here awhile

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    This is my bike with my taller seat mod and custom pillion box.
    upload_2020-10-22_17-13-59.png
  17. Sgt_Gatr

    Sgt_Gatr Adventurer

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    I managed to space it over a bit. Help but just barely. Turning it side to side doesn’t seem to do anything because as soon as you tighten the hanger it turns it straight again.

    I’m going to have to make a bracket that will lower it a bit. Just not sure how much I can safely flex the pipe.
  18. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    BS3 BS4 and Euro4 aren't what drove the cam profile. Fuel economy is. India is nuts about fuel economy like we are about horsepower. Worth mentioning that the three BS3 carb bikes imported to the US for market testing beat emissions standards by a mile. Overwhelming consumer preference for EFI over carb is a major part of the reason why we waited until EFI was out to get Himalayans here.
    RCruiser likes this.
  19. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    Being repetitive, I can only say I have done over 500km per day on Indian roads using an air cushion. I originally had the airhawk and after than was stolen I got a Indian made clone that works just as nice for 20% of the money:

    https://www.amazon.in/FEGO-Leather-Suspension-Seat-Black/dp/B079VVTPHJ/
  20. BillMcQuade

    BillMcQuade Slow way round

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    Or, just buy a PowerTronic, and have future flexibility. In all honesty, there is no way that the BoosterPlug can be optimised for any bike. It is still based on a fixed percentage of fueling increase, even if it incorporates a thermistor or 2 in the circuit.

    Tuning the Himalayan, I have actually found that the timing is the most critical factor, in fact, at higher RPM (in my "freeway" map) I'm actually pulling fuel out of the standard map, whilst bumping the advance to a "lean cruise" condition. For running around town, I'm adding fuel to keep the cylinder temps down, but still adding a fistfull of advance.

    If you don't feel like tweaking the maps, even the base maps provided by PT are light years in front of the OEM tune.

    The BoosterPlug gives you none of that flexibility.
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