Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Kiwi59

    Kiwi59 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Hi Randy, I must not be the only short inside seam Hima owner, stock seat for me is a butt killer for more than hours ride, bought the touring seat is it better. Had a two week trip in Feb this year. Better than standard but still not what what I would like. Going to see an old school upholster I know and have a chat to him. May replace the stock seat foam. Hima was originally designed for Indian market, MPG is very important as fuel costs are high. Know some people who have been on an organised tour and fuel can be bought off the back of a truck in milk bottles? Quality left a bit to be desired, bikes still ran though. May also have insurance and rego costs linked to bike out put or engine size. Roads may also not require a better preforming engine as some of the U Tube videos I have watched, these roads would not be tolerated in many countries. Sam may be able to confirm if the above is correct!! If not I apologize for getting it wrong.
    I think RE will have been surprised by the number of countries the Hima is being sold in. This may have also helped in the improvements to the equipment levels now being supplied (tongue in cheek comment). Each new model improvements are only small but improvements all the same abs =now switchable, better breaking, flashing lights ( hazards in some countries) I have a carb model and was lent a demo FI bike for 3 days. fueling was better, bike revered out more quickly and bike is way smoother. I know some carb owners will not agree but I am only comparing my bike to the loaner. Bike has done just on 15,000km in just over a year. Depending on what RE bring out in Milan this year I will look at the version that you now have in the US. Hopefully will arrive in December-Jan period. When the bike has run a couple of thousand KM, new cam, exhaust and filter and a fuel controller (not sure which one yet)
    Dont want to go faster just a bit more on the big hills ( dont like the look of a bumper near rear end of the bike) when there is little to know room to pull over and let them past.:-) PS bike put a smile on dial every time I take it for a ride.
  2. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    It's a shame some people sell their Himalayans after just a few hundred or a thousand miles, especially if their reason is "lack of power." My experience is that the "problem" of low power seems to go away after a few thousand miles. I don't know if the engine's actually picking up a few ponies as it breaks in, or I've learned how to make full use of what power it has (you do have to get used to wringing its little neck, but the bike seems to thrive on such treatment), or the concerns about power are outweighed by the many rewards of riding the bike (not the least of which is the 65-70 mpg). It's probably a combination of these things.

    That said, I would be interested in some numbers about what that "20% more power" drop-in cam delivers... especially in a bike with stock ECM (no Power Commander, Booster Plug, etc.) and exhaust (no cat delete, no loud pipe). And I would be very interested in what this cam does to fuel economy.

    BTW, I'm the second owner of my Himma; first owner put only 700 miles on the bike. The dealer said he was an older gent with no great desire to ride off pavement, and when the 650 twins came out he decided one of them was a better choice. Of course, this is a story told by a dealer...
  3. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I think you may have hit it with, "It's probably a combination of these things." I do feel that my bike loosened up and picked up a little power after some point... maybe 800 miles, maybe even 1200-1300, or even a bit more... Hard to say exactly, but I think it changed quite a bit up to somewhere around that point. And I also think that I began to get more use to it as well... Just before purchasing my Himalayan, I had picked up a TW200. It's the slowest bike I've had since my first bike, a Honda XL70, when I was 11. And it was the beginning of understanding that there's more to enjoy about riding a motorcycle than power and speed. So, when I got the Himalayan, it sort of became an extension of the exercise in "relearning" motorcycling, I guess you could say. But, quite a while ago I actually sort of realized that I really enjoyed back roads. And since those roads in my area have a speed limit of 55 or less, I had to ask, how fast do I really need to go? Quite some time ago, I found that on my my big GS I'd often be riding on local backroads, look down and realize that I was doing 80 in a 55! So, I'd slow down, and realize that on the GS I felt like I was just going soooo slooooowww.... It's just not a bike that feels fulfilling to ride at a legal speed for me. So, over the last bit, I've managed to recalibrate my brain, and discover a new part of riding... actually seeing the sights rather than just blitzing past them...

    And the "recalibration" thing... If someone jumps off of a larger, faster bike, and onto a Himalayan, the initial impression will be, "Damn! This thing is SLOW!" But, if you ride nothing but the Himalayan for a while you recalibrate and it's not as slow without the contrast. I've experienced this several times over the years on different bikes so now feel that the contrast can be a big part of the impression. In fact, recently I had been spending my time riding the TW and my other slow bike, an XT225. The Himalayan had been sitting unused for a while. When I finally decided the Hima needed some love too, and took it out for a ride, it was a MONSTER! By comparison anyway... :lol3

    And then there are the other rewards... Personally I don't care what the fuel mileage is, but I do enjoy the low seat, the amazing "tractorability" the engine has off-road, and the confidence I have taking it places I'd never venture on larger bikes. After all these years of riding, I have finally found the best bike ever built for the things I enjoy doing.

    And, as you, with that said, I am intrigued by the possibilities of the TEC cam. I already have the aftermarket exhaust, but don't find it loud at all, personally. Just a deeper, throatier sound... But, depending on what the actual effects of the cam turns out to be, I definitely wouldn't mind a bit more power.

    And I've ridden the 650. Absolutely LOVED that bike, so if someone is not interested in getting off the pavement, I can definitely see how the 650 would be the better choice as a street only machine. In fact, I still plan to add one alongside the Himalayan for when I want a change of pace... But for all around flexibility, I can't think of anything that would replace my Himalayan.
  4. BurnieM

    BurnieM Long timer

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    Just to clarify, the Tec Bike Parts Himalayan with the new cam also has a cat-less header, LexTek muffler and Boosterplug fitted. (and a DNA air filter)
  5. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yes it does. He said in the video that he would have future videos with dyno results for different setups including different exhausts, etc. When I inquired about the need for a fueling controller, the reply was that they had reached 30bhp with the stock ECU and maps, and only added the Booster Plug to enhance throttle response. Not sure what combo of exhaust or air filter that was with though. I would assume that the numbers quoted was the max increase in power they achieved, and likely included their cam, along with the DNA air filter and the exhaust shown on the bike. But that's just an assumption on my part. Hopefully future videos will be more clear on what parts achieved what...

    I already have a full Delkevic exhaust, but still running the stock filter. I have no experience with the DNA filter, but they appear to be a cotton gauze type filter, similar to K&N. Is this correct? If this is the case, I'll pass as I have serious reservations about using this type of filter in off-road conditions so will likely stick with the stock paper filter.
  6. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Well, I realized today, that in some earlier posts, and a PM conversation, that I was beginning to sound like a damn salesman for Booster Plug! :rolleyes

    Let me assure you all that I have nothing to do with the company, and until very recently had decided (quite some time ago) that they were snake oil....

    But somewhere along the way in my recent posts on the subject I guess I started convincing myself... :loco That, along with more recent reports on them from others, I had been trying to decide if I wanted to buy one and see for myself.

    So, I decided to get off the pot, and just say, "fuck it, the worst thing that'll happen is it'll do nothing at all and I'm out a few bucks." So in the interest of "science" and all things experimental in motorcycling, I just ordered one! Hitchcocks has them for 105 pounds which is about $138 US. About $22 cheaper than ordering direct, but the shipping puts it about the same so... BUT, I decided to go ahead and order their air injection delete kit rather than being cheap and cobbling one together myself. Primarily because I'd either waste a lot of time with the DIY version, or just as likely never get around to doing it. Order it, install it, and call it done. Same with the fender raising kit. Been meaning to make that as well, but never get around to it because I'd have to devise spacers, go find the correct longer bolts, etc. So, just order it, install it, and call it done. I'm also running the Hitchcocks 14T front sprocket and really prefer it over the stock 15T. And as things go, it'll need replacing sooner or later, so since I was placing an order anyway, may as well throw that in as well rather than having to pay shipping for one at a later date. So, ordering a few things at once sort of eases the shipping costs, making the BP a bit cheaper. Yeah, that's my justification for spending more money... :D Works for me...

    Not sure how long it'll take to get the order. But, in the meantime I hope to get some stock baseline readings of head temps. Once I get the Booster Plug, I'll repeat the process so I can compare to see if it does have a measureable impact on engine temps. I'll try to be systematic with the measurements so as to attempt to compare pomegranates to pomegranates as much as feasible.

    So, at least, if nothing else, maybe I can add another data point to the discussion of the BP...
  7. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    To add another data point to the side stand discussion: this is what it looks like after a year of intense use: it leans to the left quite a bit, so all the "shortened" stands will lean even more ...

    20201016_124621.jpg
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  8. drdubb

    drdubb OFWG Supporter

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    This has been discussed before, but I still wonder.
    I’ve had my Himma for over a year, put about 4000 miles on her. I recently had an ear infection and quit wearing ear plugs and I was reminded of the awful racket this engine makes, particularly when pulling at 4 to 5000 rpm. Awful metallic blatt. Doesn’t do it if not pulling at higher rpm. Has always been like this. Otherwise, runs fine. If this is natural, will an exhaust change help?
  9. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Not mine.











    It's adjustable from about an inch shorter to around an inch longer than stock. :D

    Of course, I didn't make it that way for the reason you mean, but simply because I wasn't sure how much to change it. Plus, I wanted to be able to change the length if needed in order to compensate between a bare bike, and one fully laden with gear. I haven't noticed a change though I'm uncertain what you mean by "intense use". Mine only gets used to hold up a static bike when parked. :dunno
  10. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

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    I do not think a lot of people figure this out, their ego gets in the way.
    I went from a 1200 sportster and a DR650 with mods to a TU250 and a TW200.
    Over time, I found them to be the most fun bikes I have had in 50 years of riding.


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  11. slownold

    slownold Adventurer

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    Well, after 6,300 kms, it appears my head stem bearings have packed it in. My current commute sees me riding through a square in North Adelaide ie, four tight corners. In the last few days, I've noticed that taking those corners has become difficult... well, not smooth and this morning, I realised that when stationary, the steering is notched to straight ahead.
    So what to do?
    I was heading down to my dealer at the time (not THAT sort of dealer, my motorcycle dealer). Discussing it with the service manager, he said they'd be happy to have a look at it, but it was unlikely to be a warranty repair (note - 6/19 build date, bought in Feb and its done 6,300 kms) because Royal Enfield regard head stem bearings as a consumable item, much like a chain or tyres. I can't say I was impressed.
    So now what? Regrease and readjust? Fit new bearings? If so, balls or tapered rollers? Buy a GS and hate myself?
  12. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

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    The home market is their bread and butter, no way they would they risk p*****g them off with two different performance levels. That and the more alike they can mass produce them the cheaper it is. Also tied with fuel economy, the thing India is nutso about, is price.

    So back to cams. Pre unit Bullet cams. The difference between Redditch made and Chennai made cams is so small you'd need a cam grinder shop to mic the difference in dimensions. Performance wise they are definitely different. Stuff a pair of Redditch cams in and the bike starts the same idles the same runs the same except it winds up tighter a touch quicker and doesn't fall flat on its face at 55-60.

    Now that the two year warranties if the first US batch have expired I think we'll start seeing more folks start pulling some hidden ponies out it
  13. sam2019

    sam2019 Been here awhile

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    It is a well known weak spot and RE does well not to include it into warranty otherwise they would be overrun :-)
    I had the bearings changed 3 times within 25.000km, then changed to German made SKF and since then no more problems. It seems the Indian SKF factory uses steel of lesser quality. Also the engineering is not really that smart, the entire construction is susceptible to water ingress. Someone here had a solution with a modified spray can cup. RE has issued a water shielding thingy but it seems not to solve the problem 100%. Whenever I come back from a longer ride in rough terrain I re-adjust the steering and once a year I open it to check grease and overall situation of the t-stem.
    some sources you can find here:
    https://himalayan-tools.com/maintenance-tips/
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  14. slownold

    slownold Adventurer

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    Thanks. Interesting about the bearings.
    And that link is a good resource. Thanks. It's been bookmarked for future reference. (can't say I was happy reading about the stators - I've got a carby model)
  15. BurnieM

    BurnieM Long timer

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    Absolutely. You will not hear it with an exhaust change. :-)
  16. ruckus430

    ruckus430 Adventurer

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    Dealer says my Lake Blue just hit the warehouse, I know nothing about this bike it was an impulse buy based on looks, but I know what I want lolololol boxes full of parts in my garage waiting to be installed
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  17. slownold

    slownold Adventurer

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    The little brutes are so cheap that you can afford to spend heaps of bits and bobs. The hard bit is deciding what to get next :jack

    And lake blue, that's a ripper colour :rayof
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  18. ruckus430

    ruckus430 Adventurer

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    A definite plus is that once fully customized to your liking is still cheaper than the competition. Almost spent as much on the parts and adventure riding gear as the price of the bike but that is definitely a personal choice and not mandatory.
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  19. HaveACuppaTea

    HaveACuppaTea Adventurer

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  20. HaveACuppaTea

    HaveACuppaTea Adventurer

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    Look forward to your results Randy. Should be interesting!