Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Mr Smee

    Mr Smee Adventurer

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2020
    Oddometer:
    51
    Location:
    UK Hampshire
    Yes (according to EM). There's some confusion in my mind on the actual dimensions as most appear to refer to the fuel line dia. I guess that they're probably a standard size and for $7 and change, worth a punt :hmmmmm
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  2. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,985
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    I searched for the exact terms in your posts and found it on eBay from a US seller for a bit over $8 including tax and shipping. Should be here by next Tuesday so I'll confirm. After I ordered I considered the possibility that the hose I already have made up for the GS may very well have worked. Probably should have dug around and tried to find it first. But oh well, for 8 bucks I saved the aggravation of trying to find it. I know it's somewhere in my garage... like so many other things that I have no idea where I stuck them so I could find them later... :rolleyes
  3. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

    Joined:
    May 23, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,601
    Location:
    Adelaide, South Australia
  4. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,985
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    I always fill mine on the side stand for this reason, and I never fill it to the brim either, so all bets are off as to exactly how much fuel is in the tank even when "full". I think I've ran mine about 20 miles or so after the count up began as I was sort of in a hurry and getting close to home. Was a bit nervous doing it though as I had no idea what that "reserve" capacity might be. I have some aluminum "fuel bottles" that I made from some leftover calibration gas canisters that were to be thrown out at work. I've carried one on my TW, and have four in total, with the thoughts of figuring out a good way of mounting one or two on the Himalayan for a trip like the SEAT where I might feel better having a bit of spare fuel on board just in case....


    IMG_0583.JPG IMG_0569.JPG

    I could throw a couple of those on and see how far she goes before I need 'em. I forget exactly, but I think they hold just a bit under 2L each...

    Yep, I've always went under the assumption that it's not good to run a pump dry. And while I could be wrong, I always assumed that a short duration thing wouldn't likely kill a pump, so as long as you turned it off when it started sputtering, you'd probably be ok. I think the issues arose from people that ran out of gas, coasted for a ways, pulled over and sat there for a while trying to figure out why their bike had stopped running, as the pump sat there running without cooling or lubrication of the fuel. Could be totally wrong in that, but I've never been terribly concerned about running out of gas. Shit happens, so I would think the pump could handle it as long as one isn't a dumbass about it.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  5. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    643
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    So Bill, you actually advanced the timing thru out the range with benefits. Why I ask is that on my carbed bike I advanced the throttle position sensor and found the bike to be more "lively" across the range.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  6. Kiwiscoot

    Kiwiscoot Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2010
    Oddometer:
    643
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    I am surprised at such low mileage. Did you check your bearings to see if they had enough grease on them from the factory? Do you wash your bike with s hose and squirt water on the steering head as Adelaide is not the wettest place for rain ingress? You could just re-grease them and move them to a different position. Mine has 24 000km on with no problems and we have much more rain here on the South Island of NZ. I made a rain shield like this.
    https://advrider.com/f/threads/royal-enfield-himalayan-owners-thread.1253460/page-674#post-39110523
    https://advrider.com/f/threads/royal-enfield-himalayan-owners-thread.1253460/page-674#post-39111266
  7. buckthedog

    buckthedog Eastbound and down

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,046
    Location:
    South Mississippi
    When I was trying to get my stuck CSC RX3 fuel pump to work again, I would let it spin in my hands to test it. It generated quite a bit of heat without fuel flowing through it. Ethanol literally destroyed my fuel filter attached to the in-tank pump and the pump sucked the giblets of it and locked up. I beat it into submission, and hooked the leads to my battery to test it. Yeah, it got hot, lending credence to the urban legend of letting your car/bike/whatever always run super low on gas. I can see that leading to an early demise. I pumped a whole Lowes bucket or 2 of water through the pump to test it, once my Ohms came down to what I believe is a normal level of resistance after I cleared the clog/unstuck the impeller on it. A minute or 2 won't hurt it, but 10 min periodically while your bike sputters to a stop? Likely so. It's hard to say how much it heats up and for how long before you're out of gas. They ain't cheap. Was $250 on the lowly RX3, so I wouldn't risk it. Luckily I saved it, ghetto engineered a new filter I randomly picked up at AutoZone and sold the bike. Still rides great according to the new owner.
    Randy likes this.
  8. Eatmore Mudd

    Eatmore Mudd Mischief on wheels.

    Joined:
    May 28, 2012
    Oddometer:
    3,809
    Location:
    Wet side of WA.
    Old woods riding carb bike trick: when it sputters switch to reserve. When that runs out lay the bike over on its left side so the "dead stock" fuel in the right lobe of the tank will slosh over the center hump to the the left lobe. That'll net ya another 1/2 liter to a whole liter of usable fuel depending on the tank.
    Kiwiscoot and Randy like this.
  9. Mister_Dog

    Mister_Dog Digging Under the Fence

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2018
    Oddometer:
    91
    Location:
    NY/PA Twin Tiers
    I got ~48 miles out of mine with no issues even on uphill slopes. 50 miles on reserve is my general max because you have to rev it out so damn hard I never trust fuel efficiency figures in any given moment of riding.
    Randy likes this.
  10. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,985
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    Oh yeah! I still do the sputter and switch routine regularly. Sort of sucks when you do and realize that you'd accidently put it on reserve initially, or forgot to switch it back to On when you gassed up last... :doh

    And it's good to know to lay the bike over on it's left side when that happens... If you're lucky, it just might get you to some gas... Been there, done that...
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  11. Randy

    Randy Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2002
    Oddometer:
    4,985
    Location:
    Newnan, GA USA
    Another of those things I meant to do and forgot all about. Thanks for the reminder and the links. Somehow, I've managed to not ride the Himalayan in the rain since I've owned it. Hell, I think it's only ever been wet once since it was assembled and crated up, when I washed it. Not counting a creek crossing or two that is. And I never use a full pressure stream when I wash a bike. But it's just a matter of time before it sees a rain ride or two, so the little DIY rain shield might be a good idea. Certainly won't hurt.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  12. BurnieM

    BurnieM Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,392
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Looks like you have the tank off. You need it off or it is even worse.
    Helps if you have long thin fingers.

    There is a tab on the top/forward side of the AIT plug.
    Push it down then pull the plug forward.

    Yes, it is a pain.
    .
  13. slownold

    slownold Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2020
    Oddometer:
    98
    Location:
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Yeah, I'm a bit surprised and a bit pissed as well. We've had some heavy rain in recent weeks and she's been sitting out all day in it. I've got a mate with a GT535 - his bearings went the same way fairly quickly and when he finally got around to doing something about them, they were rusty. Although mine shows a build date of 6 / 2019, it's a carby model and it's possible it's a left over frame from earlier or some such daft thing. In any event, when I pull it apart, I expect to find rust.

    Interestingly, this morning I just turned the bars from lock to lock a few times and it felt immediately better. So this afternoon, I sprayed some light lube around the top bearing and things freed up even more - this fits with the rust theory as opposed to a dimple in the ball race.

    But I'll be fitting new tapered rollers when I get the chance. It's still well under warranty (only bought it in Feb) but I'd rather the better bearings and so will do the repair myself.

    Thanks for the tip on the water shield. I'll have a look at that when I do the bearings.
  14. Mister_Dog

    Mister_Dog Digging Under the Fence

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2018
    Oddometer:
    91
    Location:
    NY/PA Twin Tiers
    Thank you for your response.

    Yes, the tank was pulled and the air box side cover removed at that time.

    I have a specific issue. The shoulder of the probe mount to the side is physically blocking the removal of the plug. This appears to be part of the throttle body. I imagine the large brass screw is an adjuster — Idle speed, possibly? I do not believe the plug can be removed without removing and replacing this element. The depth of the plug is too great to permit removal, I perceive.

    Am I wrong? If so, how is the plug to be removed, specifically? If I am correct, how is the probe mount to be loosened and adjusted to permit the pull, and then replaced? I would prefer not monkeying around with throttle body without the voice of experience.
  15. BurnieM

    BurnieM Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,392
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Yep, the brass screw is the idle adjuster. Leave it alone :)

    Sounds like you are talking about the Throttle Position Sensor. I unplugged the TPS first.

    Do not loosen the Air Intake Temp sensor (AIT), just unplug it (which is a pain).

    You do not need to take off the airbox cover unless you want to confirm which one is the AIT sensor.
  16. Mister_Dog

    Mister_Dog Digging Under the Fence

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2018
    Oddometer:
    91
    Location:
    NY/PA Twin Tiers
    Perhaps I was not clear.

    The red-outlined sensor mount is physically butted against the end of the plug body. It cannot be pulled out as things stand. How is this problem overcome? 05C697F3-6BD1-47D8-853E-1AA3BEB7FA10.jpeg
  17. NJ-Brett

    NJ-Brett Brett

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10,409
    Location:
    Southern New Jersey
    On my SR400 (2 valve long stroke air cooled 400cc motor) advancing the timing above 5000 rpm made the biggest difference in power
    output. I felt no improvement in mixture changes.
    I kept it to 2 degrees and above 5000 rpm but with premium fuel could have tried more.
    When I hit 5000 rpm it felt a bit like a turbo kicked in.

    Over time, the vibration of the motor made the power commander erratic and I had to remove it, don't hard mount
    add on boxes, I had it under the battery hold down strap.
    Eatmore Mudd and Mister_Dog like this.
  18. BurnieM

    BurnieM Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2003
    Oddometer:
    4,392
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    I do not think that is a sensor. I believe it is where the throttle cable attaches to the throttle body.

    Below and slightly forward on the left side of the throttle body is the TPS.
    To the left (of the TPS) and slightly towards the rear is the AIT which is the one you want.
    The AIT is mounted on the front of the airbox near the top.
  19. Beemerboff

    Beemerboff Long timer

    Joined:
    May 23, 2005
    Oddometer:
    3,601
    Location:
    Adelaide, South Australia
    Read somewhere that brown stuff on the head bearings is actually the result of " False Brinneling" not just rust, and if so the correct bearings, grease and adjustment might be better than waterproofing.

    Part of the problem is that constant small movements on the head bearings squeeze out the grease on a small, localized area, which is why the correct grease is important and why turning the bars to full lock regularly is a good idea as it redistributes the grease around the bearing.

    Google a bit further than Wiki for a best info.
    slownold, Kiwiscoot and Eatmore Mudd like this.
  20. gkaan

    gkaan Bikes on the Brain Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2004
    Oddometer:
    732
    Location:
    Central Vermont
    Are there been any foot peg lowering kits made for the Himalayan? I've got a 34" inseam and would like to start putting some miles on this bike but its ergos are tight. I have the Seat Concepts tall seat on order but believe I'll still need a little more leg room. I did a search on this forum and nothing came up...