Royal Enfield Himalayan Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Anthiron, Sep 2, 2017.

  1. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I was considering welding one up myself. I thought I even had a spare lever already, but when I found it yesterday, it turns out that it's aluminum rather than steel. So, I looked at ordering a new stock part to modify, and then a decent quality folding lever, like IMS or such. Doing that, I'd likely have as much or more in it by the time I got done than just ordering one already done. Of course, if I just used the one on the bike, it would be cheaper. But, as I did when I modified my side stand, I'd prefer to use a spare in case I FUBAR it. Of course, my stand mod worked out perfectly, so I have the original that I have no use for now.... And, modifying the shift lever is quite a bit more simple than what I did with the stand.

    But, yeah, if you can find out what it would be, including shipping to the US, I may be interested.
  2. slownold

    slownold Adventurer

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    I know a relatively new Himalayan owner (and rider) in Mt Barker. Send me a PM if you'd like me to put you in touch with him. I know he'd be interested.
  3. systemic_anomaly

    systemic_anomaly Adventurer

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    I think I’d tend to agree with that. Same with the handlebars. My OE handlebar was pre-bent by PO when I bought the bike. I couldn’t get the stock bar so I just bought the cheapest steel one I could find online (Moose Racing CR Hi Bend $20). I figure an expensive strong aluminum bar like a Renthal would probably not absorb the impact as well, and just send it upstream for something more expensive to break or bend, or knock the triple clamps out of alignment sooner.
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  4. BurnieM

    BurnieM Long timer

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    And I go the other way; if the bike is going offroad at all I throw on a pair of ali bars. Steel bars bend way too easily.
  5. Ductor411

    Ductor411 Adventurer

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    A replacement gear pedal for the Honda XR 600 can be cut and welded onto the original, with a length to suit the rider’s boot. C5A6C369-960F-4730-898E-8E4EEAC0440D.jpeg
    Beemerboff likes this.
  6. Mr Smee

    Mr Smee Adventurer

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    To all who showed interest in folding gearchange lever. I have passed Ben Wood a link to this part of the thread so will leave it up to him to see if he wants to follow up. In the UK, the price is comparable to a standard replacement lever as far as I can see. However cost to ship Internationally is likely to be the "problem" I guess. Over to you Ben - opportunities await!!
    Loadtoad101 and slownold like this.
  7. BurnieM

    BurnieM Long timer

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    I buy stuff from Hitchcocks so international postage is par for the course for me.

    +1 interested in one of his gear levers

    [​IMG]
  8. ScottFree

    ScottFree Been here awhile

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    Question: has anybody tried the CalSci windshield yet? Got a review?
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  9. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    Got mine for less than £10GBP from eBay. Remember to order ones for Yamaha bike as the is a r/h thread and l/h thread on RE bikes
    sam2019 likes this.
  10. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    That's the same place i originally fitted mine but found mud thrown from the front wheel. I moved then the just under the tank guards in the end. Using the pre-fitted nuts on the guards
  11. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    TEC are bringing out a spring tip gear lever in the near future. There are a lot of levers on eBay but the pivot borehole is larger. An SV650 is very near size but a sleeve is needed in the pivot hole. Easy fix with a bit of steel tubing. The levers cost from £6.50 up to £36.00GBP if your willing to make the spacer.
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  12. Doctor T

    Doctor T Gruppy old git

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    Wrote 3 posts today. Is no one on here today? Feeling lonely. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHH
  13. pnw-rider

    pnw-rider Been here awhile

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    Im just here because watching Itchy Boots cross the globe on a himalayan really impressed me. Neat bike, id love to ride one someday.
    Eatmore Mudd, Doctor T and slownold like this.
  14. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    I finally got around to starting on that project last weekend. Just need time to finish up the wiring... :becca

    I wanted to try to mount mine out of harms way so will be mounting them up higher. I made some brackets that attach to the holes on the back side of the tank bar's horizontal piece...


    IMG_0627.JPG

    I have the brackets and lights mounted so just need to complete the wiring so I can test them out.
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  15. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    While in the process of this project I had the LED headlight unit out of the bucket. I had issues with that fogging up, and had previously mentioned maybe drilling a small hole in the LED housing to allow it to vent, and hopefully solve the fogging issue....

    Since I had it out I looked it over and noticed this...

    IMG_1132.JPG


    I pulled that black rubber cap off and discovered this underneath...


    IMG_1133.JPG


    It appears to be a piece of filter paper affixed to a breathe hole. The rubber cap was tight and had it completely sealed. So, now I'm wondering if this was intended to be removed upon installation in order to allow the housing to breathe. :hmmmmm

    I'll leave it off and see if the fogging stops...


    :dunno
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  16. Leyprest

    Leyprest Adventurer

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    I'd like some information on Himalayan inner tubes please.

    I've heard you can run a 21 front inner tube on the 17 rear and that many people just carry a front inner tube for this reason. Would I be right in thinking this is just a short term fix to allow you to carry on your journey and it should be changed as soon as possible or not? Is there any downside to running a front inner tube on the rear in the longer term?

    Thanks for any help/advice you can offer.
  17. Randy

    Randy Long timer

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    Yes and no. It can be done but it's not the best practice. The larger 21" tube will not be able to relax fully in the smaller diameter tire/wheel, so will have folds and wrinkles which will contribute to pretty rapid chaffing, wear and eventual failure, perhaps catastrophically. In addition, the front tubes are typically much smaller in cross section so have to be stretched more to fill the volume of the larger rear tire. This can also create more rapid deflation (think blow out) when it lets go. There is a reason the manufacturers make so many sizes of tubes after all.

    I think this idea comes from trail riding where the speeds are generally low and the ride duration is shorter. So, yeah, it can get you out of the woods and back to the truck, but not something I'd count on for longer distances and higher speeds. And DEFINITELY NOT as a long term solution. I carry both front and rear tubes with me for this reason. Plus, I'm lazy and don't want to have to change it again when I get home even if it did last long enough...
  18. Leyprest

    Leyprest Adventurer

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    Thanks Randy.
  19. Solera

    Solera Adventurer

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    Must look at mine then. I had fogging as well in the LED unit I fitted. It is supposed to have a vent. Raised it with the "manufacturer" as it has 2 year warranty, and their response is below.

    "There are mainly 4 different types of moisture which I will explain.
    1. Water vapor
    2. Small water droplets
    3. Pooled water
    4. Large droplets and pooled water

    Condensation is a naturally occurring condition that can affect any light. It does not suggest a defect in a product, as opposed to what happens when a leak occurs, in which case there is water ingress that could lead to a system failure.
    Condensation is the change of water from a gaseous form (vapor) into liquid water. It appears as small droplets of moisture inside the light.

    Water ingress describes water that leaks into the light, manifesting itself as large droplets and pooling of water that is visible.

    XXXXX lights are designed to allow moisture to escape and not reenter, but it takes time for the moisture to evaporate (the amount of time will depend upon whether or not the light is turned on or not).

    Virtually all lights are prone to condensate initially due to the following events:


    • Air is trapped inside a lamp when manufactured
    • Plastic parts used in lights naturally absorb moisture in the air
    • The thermal paste behind the PCB board has moisture.
    • As the light heats up, these plastics parts release moisture that mixes with air
    • Moisture attaches itself to the coldest part of the lamp, e.g. the lens
    • Halogen lamps tend to run hot, so the moisture evaporates more quickly
    • LED lights produce less heat so condensation takes longer to evaporate so that it can be more noticeable.

    What you have pictured is not concerning at all and will not inhibit the function of the light at all and will dissipate after some time. The length of time will vary as mentioned earlier. We see visible vapor during colder periods."

    The usual "it's normal" brush off. No other sealed LED light I have on other vehicles has done that. Maybe it was assembled in the same factory as the Himma clocks (it fogs too).
    slownold likes this.
  20. Loadtoad101

    Loadtoad101 Been here awhile

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    When returning to this thread, or any other here on the adv forum when I click on a thread you would normally be taken immediately to the next post that you haven't read yet. For the last week my computer goes to the top of the page where the next unread post is, then after many seconds of waiting, it jumps to the next post that has not been read. Is anyone else having the same issue?
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.