RTW on a H.A.T. In the slow lane.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by gperkins, Sep 7, 2016.

  1. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Yep yokesman, I see from time to time different lever systems to pick up your bike. But to be honest, unless you have a back injury and you need one of these. Then maybe the bike is not the right one. Realistically it takes Kat & I both to pick up our bike when she decides to have a little nap. Of course technique is everything. It took a full year and numerous falls before we figured out it is far easier if I take the rear end and she the front end. Seems counter intuitive at first, but makes sense once put into practice. Of course, not going tits up in the first place would help.
  2. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    If there is one thing I miss about our home back in Australia it is the fruit and vegetable garden we left behind. We are very nearly self suficient including raising a steer each year. So it was a pleasure to take a look around the little oasis here at Hassilabeid. At first i couldn't figure out where the water was coming from, but then it all become clear. At the edge of all the greenery is a serious of wells all in a row. Each no more than maybe 15 or 20 metres to the next and all of them interconnected under ground. This way the artesian water can be collected from a vast area and directed to the fertile plain to water the date palms and vegetable crops.

    Here you can see a row of wells running off into the distance a second row is off to the right. They all meet at one point where the water is then diverted into the oasis.
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    The water is constantly flowing into the oasis and directed one way or the other, where ever it is needed.
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    Just add water and you can grow just about anything.
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    As we travelled further west towards Tinghir we recognised immediately a more extensive artesian well network. This needed further investigation. We were to learn that there was a network of 16 kilometres of under ground interconnected canals. I couldn't believe it at first. But it was obvious the system was vast as the wells could be seen to go on for ever. So vast in fact that the artesian water was now totally depleted. Seems the over use of the earths resources is not a recent phenomenom. Seems we humans are slow learners, who knew? :dunno
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    Because the system was now depleted you could enter here and go for a look around. I'd guess the canal floor is about 8 to 10 metres down.
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    Here's a tiny section of 16 kilometres of depleted and exhausted under ground artesian canal. You can clearly see where the water has undercut the wall. The rounded stones for the lowest metre or so certainly indicates that this used to be a river bed way back when. I can't even being to imagine the human effort to dig this lot out. Never did I have to crouch down the height was between 2 and 3 metres.
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  3. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    3-4-500lbs for me makes no difference to a 50 yo injury left unattended before physical therapy was initiated. when we were in Thailand in 2016 , after about 90 days touring n returning south once again we attempted to cross Bangkok, for some 5 hours. Not having but our iPhone to direct us thru the maze of streets we arrived at a Chinese hotel for businessmen, near the salt distillation farms, outside Bangkok. This place had Real matteresses ,ones that had cushion too much I guess, for when I rotated out of bed the next morning I pulled my back, there to stay for another 4 nights. If my wife hadn't found the muscle relaxers at he truck stop next door Im sure it would have been much longer, a day or two later a monsoon hit like only they can in asia so we watched our little fz150 undercover , take a wet whip beating. We thankful for 7-11 n microwave fried rice.

    As for over using available resources, my take on that is today we don't have the builders in the west, China has no problem building, But those with no desire to resolve the needs but to make our very existence the problem itself.
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  4. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    I feel for your back pain. The only thing that has put me in an ambulance is back pain after being bed bound for 2 days and that was from wearing the wrong shoes! I had recurring back pain last year in Pakistan that made us both really take care for a good month or so. It's somewhere I don't won't to go back to thats for sure.
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  5. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    We took a little ride up to Toumilile out of Tinghir passing through the gorges along the way. It was pretty damn fresh riding through those gorges, but once in the sunshine it was well worth the effort, even once we were at 1900 metres. Not too high I know, but these mountains are as cold as any mid winter.

    Old man walking home with his groceries, young girls chatting away in the doorway, abandoned mosque all from our bedroom window here in Tinghir[​IMG]

    In the valley you'll nearly always find water, then you get people including the old dilapidated kasbah in the distance, Toumilile, Morocco.
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    Today just happened to be market day here in Toumilile. The market has been a regular thing for only the past 2 years. No longer do the locals have to travel to Tinghir to shop. The paved road was completed in 2006 and running water supplied to all in the village only 3 months ago.
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    I want the traditional lolly pop over there, says the kid in the red wind breaker.
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    Islamic cemeteries are simple affairs. I have no idea how old this one is or in fact how over the generations people keep track of who's buried where.
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    On the road between Tinghir & Toumilile, Morocco
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  6. worldmotoadventure

    worldmotoadventure n00b

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    Hi Graeme and Katrina. (Stuart) here

    I met you 2 briefly in Vashist, India when you went through. Just spent the last 3 days at work reading through your RR.

    Great RR and great journey guys!
    I'm planning on heading off in July/August 2019 and will be visiting some of the places you have discovered and shared.

    Hope you are well and loving life. (looks like you are)

    Cheers
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  7. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    Having grown up on a farm, I always like having a chat with the locals about their agriculture - a nice neutral subject.
    The poppy farmers in Turkey were kind enough to tell me what was going on there.
  8. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Of course I remember worldmotoadventure (Stuart) and I'm pleased to see you are utilising your time at work well. :D Whats the general plan of your travels? Perhaps our paths may cross once again, you never know. Also do you plan to post a blog here or somewhere else. If you do be sure to send me the link. Safe and fun travels. :thumb
  9. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    I just seem to have it my blood DavidM1. I'm in my happy place either in the garden or on the motorbike. Both my granddads were great gardeners, it kinda skipped a generation with my old man, but both Katrina and I get a lot of enjoyment trying to keep plants alive and feeding our selves from our garden.

    Here's a couple of graturitous shots of our vegetable garden from a couple of years ago. Who knows what condition it will all be in when we finally settle back into domesticity?
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    Sweeping out the vege garden. Wadya mean anal, I have noooooo idea what your talking about? :dunno Note Isl Man T shirt, cheers to my good mate Andy. :thumb
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    Next post back to our normal viewing. We've got some great photos, but the wifi speed here in TaTa is abysmal. The above effort took maybe the best part of 2hrs, sigh.
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  10. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    We are now into the Morocco that I knew I'd really enjoy. Away from the medina's & souks of Fez & Chefchaouen and into the dry interior. Maybe it's because of the similarity's to Australia's outback. Many people pass through these vast open spaces and see next to nothing. Not me, I see the opposite and just love viewing the ribbon of shimmering road vanish off to the horizon. The occasional nomad keeping a watchful eye over their flock of sheep & goats. Camels grazing in the distance the odd sqirrel scamper across the road in front or kites searching for thermals in the vivid blue sky. Yep love every minute of it.

    No road trip to Morocco would be complete without the obligatory photo of Dades du Gorges. We took a quick diversion of 30 klms or so just to run up this little bit of twisty tarmac. Good thing we did, because we ran into Ivan from Switzerland a fellow long distance traveller on his 93 Africa Twin.
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    On this ocassion Ivan could only afford a month away from work, but previously he's done Alaska to Ushuaia.
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    Here in Ait Ben Haddau, hollywood and others have been making movies for 50 years or more. More recently, most notably Gladiator amongst others, due to the completeness and authenticity of it's Kasbah. Ok, it's pretty neat if you can navigate your way through the ever present and some what annoying hawkers trying to flog cheap tourist tac.
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    Although I can't be entirly sure. I think that is a mausaleum off in the distance. What i find intruiging is, once again collapsed subterranean canal system. It can be seen by the series of depressions that were once wells. Then in front of that is a vast area of standing stones, again denoting an ancient cemetry. This can all be seen from the hill above the Kasbah, but no other visiter paid any attention to view on this side.
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    Ait Ben Haddau Kasbah, seen in countless movies over the years.
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    Then we were into that vast open interior, love it.
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  11. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    finally went thru Death valley this year on the way back from socal, one artist relative asked , why there nothing to see?
    be it forest , desert or canyons , they all have their appeal, though I haven't taken that opinion when over 1000s of miles of ocean.
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  12. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    There are a whole lot of sights to see in and around Death Valley ( Vegas is not one of them ) thats for sure. Having spent the best part of 5 years in total at sea I sort of agree. Except Antarctic and sub Antarctic waters. The sea life and bird life that you see down there is extraordinary. If ever the oppurtunity arises go down and take a look yokesman. I've been many times with my work including stepping onto Antarctica. However Katrina hasn't, so assuming we get to Usaiua, then it is on the agenda, bank balance allowing of course.
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  13. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Whilst in the touristy northern part of Morocco there are police check points at every major round-about, both entering and leaving a town. Never once did the police stop us to check documents. But as we venture further south and certainly as we cross over to Western Sahara we are checked incestantly. It's bloody annoying thats for sure. The police tell us it is for our security, but really if we are kidnapped or ambushed in anyway, some police check 15 kilometres back is going to mean tiddly squat. Allow me to explain, Western Sahara is a southerly extension of Morocco. Like a lot of Africa it used to be a colony of Spain up until the 60's. Since then it has been officially recognised by the UN, wait for it..............United Nations list of non-self-governing territories.................What? The up shot is Morocco has made claim of this vast tract of western Africa and the worlds countries are pretty evenly split as to the validity of this claim. Or support competing claims from Mauritania and the tribes people known as the Sahrawi. Until fairly recently there had been sporadic fighting and foreigners passing through here were often escorted by police or military. So yeah there is reason for the police presence at major intersections. But realisticly if someone wanted to do some hapless tourist some harm, they are hardly going to attach at the endge of town near an round about or intersection. Oh well, all part and parcel of travelling this long lonely African Atlantic coastline.

    Fishermans hut hanging precariously below the cliffs edge, Western Sahara.
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    Sahara to the right, Atlantic to the left.
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    Flamingo's in a lagoon, Western Sahara.
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    Who needs a full palet of colours when two will do. :0-0
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    Tomorrow we reach as far south as we will go in Africa for now. That is to the town of Dahkla, Western Sahara, beyond are more open spaces of Mauritania and then Senegal. Trouble is Senegal now demands you have a Carnet for the motorbike. Seeing as we don't, there seems very little point going beyond Dahkla, just to turn back at the Senegelese boarder.
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  14. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    I'd like to add an adjunct to the above. Not more than 30 minutes after posting the previous comment, Katrina & I have just read that two female tourists, one from Denmark the other from Norway have been found murdered in the high Atlas mountains today. Decapitaed no less, beyond that we know very little else. Yeah I guess like everywhere in the world today, you need to take all the usual precautions. I feel for them and their the next of kin, RIP.
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  15. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    That's awful news. I see it's a very popular area for hiking, just 50 miles south of Marrakesh.
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  16. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Correct DavidM1, really not so far from where we were just a few days ago up at Toumliline, perhaps 30 kilometres or so. Until more is know I really don't want to speculate. But most probably totally random, but I just don't know.
  17. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    I really should be following you on the map, hadn't got round to doing that. But enjoying the photos.
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  18. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi Love my Tranny Super Supporter

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    I have two screens so my second screen is always open on google maps (satellite view) so I can see where they are and the terrain. This is one ride report I do not generally read on my cell phone, preferring to see the photos on my 27 inch screen with the map right next to it.

    Keep it rolling Graeme, loving this section. And keep safe. Cheers.
  19. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Good point there DavidM1, I should have thought earlier to post up a map of our last few weeks. Although this isn't entirely accurate it is a pretty good aproximation of what we have done since arriving in Africa. Dahkla can be seen as the next town south a quick 320 odd kilometres tomorrow. We are not at all sure how long we will stay there. It really depends upon the cost of accomodation. Our understanding that it is mostly a western tourist bolt hole. Thats both good and bad. Typically everything is at hand, but there is not a lot of African authenticity about the palce. Which is an inately stupid remark, seeing as the place is in Africa, sure as hell isn't in Asia or South America.

    Our run back north will see us pick up a lot of the coastal area that we've so far mised.
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  20. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Cheers MrKiwi you just don't see the hundreds, nah thousands of photos that end up in the bin. In any case thanks for your kind words. :thumb
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