RTW on a H.A.T. In the slow lane.

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by gperkins, Sep 7, 2016.

  1. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    I like this, it looks weird with the columns lining up strangely. This is Lagina, isn't it? I recognise the temple of Hecate.

    That's been on my to-do list for a while now. Did you stay the night there?
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  2. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    You are indeed right DavidM1 that shot was taken at Lagina. We visited here first before moving onto Labranda and then to Miletos.

    We didn't stop over night at Karina, instead we are being very generously hosted by our friends Levent & Hatice at Yalikavak just outside of Bodrum. The fish restaurant was excelent, you pay by the weight as I'm sure you are aware and the price is nearly half of what you would pay in Bodrum.
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  3. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    I was invited along with Levent to take a ride through the hills of SW Turkey with Namik and two other friends. Twelve hours and nearly 400 klms later we arrived back at Levent & Hatices totally shagged. Good day for sure, but I just wasn't expecting a little ride out with friends to be such a marathon. Perhaps I'm getting soft in my dotage.

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    Three Africa Twins a 660 Tenere and Namiks GS800. I don't normally like black bikes, but I must say the black Africa Twin looks pretty damn good to my eye.

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    Typical countryside in SW Turkey. Those pines with the rounded profile are the ones that pine nuts are harvested from for cooking and eating.

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    The large bald rock in the centre doesn't look like much at first glance. But a closer inspection reveals old collapsed fortifications. This part of the world is choka-block full of this sort of thing.

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    We love Turkish food, unlike a lot of places when on the road, there is variety available. A particular favourite is Pide in it's many forms. Sometimes called Turkish pizza.

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    Then it was a visit to Levent's parents and their small farm, last year they harvested 40 tonnes of pomegranate amongst many other fruits and vegetables.
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  4. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Having caught up with many of the guys and girls that we were first introduced to back in Oct 17 it was time to move on and make our way around to the Mediterranian coast, taking in as many different roads as possible. Man you really are spoilt for choice thats for sure. Choose wisely though, because some of those little twisty, winding roads that head up into the hills and mountains can quickly turn to shitty goat tracks real quick. This does not please SWMBO at all, I can tell you. :augie

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    I just couldn't get the GPS to get me from one side of this mountain to the other no matter what I did. The road was there, I knew that, it was plain to see on the map. I just thought stuff it, I'll get over one way or another. Then it all became quite apparent............military zone, with fences, gates and security cameras. :fpalm

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    The sensibly, alternative, coastal route gave us views like this.

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    The tortoise and the hare, ahh what am i saying, two tortoises. Most days we see between 2 and 4 of these little guys.

    It took a herculean effort to get this lot uploaded. When wifi eventually improves I'll get a decent up date done.

    Oh heres something to remember if you are every touring this part of the world. Google up Ogretmenevi. It literally means "teacher's house". In most towns and citys of Turkey the government has built a housing block to house their school teachers. If there are rooms available, you are welcome to stay. The standard price from what we can see is 70 Turkish lire per person per night. The rooms are basic to reasonable hotel standard. Thats about $12 US and includes a decent breakfast, bargain!
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  5. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Anyone with just a rudimentary understanding of both geography and history will immediately understand how it is that Turkey really does stand at a crossroads. You want to go north into Europe from Africa, then chances are you'll pass through Turkey. East from Europe to Asia and vise-versa, once again you'll pass through Turkey. So it's no wander that the place is chock-a-block full of evidence of passing civilisations over countless millennia. But you don't have to go back 1000's of years or hundreds of years of history for that matter to see the evidence. Kayakoy is just a few kilometres south of the tourist town of Fethiye, but most tourists have no idea of the abandoned Greek village of Kayakoy. For several hundreds of years, during the Ottoman reign, many people of Greek heritage lived in what is now Turkey and for that matter many Turkish people lived in Greece and other surrounding countries. But WW1 changed all that. The Turks as we know were on the loosing side and not only that the Otoman empire was in terminal decline. The country was being torn apart from within including pressure from powers beyond their own boarders. The final blow came with them loosing all territories in what would later became known as Yugoslavia. All this turmoil created much upheaval and what we would later describe as ethnic cleansing would take place right across the region on a massive scale. Ethnic Turks left Greece and the Balkans and ethnic Greeks left Turkey. At least the fortunate ones did, many died or were lucky to escape with just what they carried and nothing more. So in the early 1920's there was once again mass migration across this part of the world and the once thriving town of Kayakoy with it's 20,000 inhabinants would become a ghost town practically overnight.

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    This was the smaller of two churches on the site.

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    It was bloody hot work walking up and down these hillsides in all our bike gear. Thats the small church in the background.

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    Having reached the top we witnessed a grounds keeper hoisting the Turkish flag. I made mention that I thought it would be a good idea to have two flag poles. One to carry the Turkish flag and the other the Greek flag. Both to acknowledge recent pass history and to foster friendship. I think my words were carried away on the wind.

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    Then it was over to the other side of the town to investigate the larger church.

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    This being just after Easter, someone left a decorated egg behind.

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    Just a reminder that the day still had a bit of a bike theme, hows this for a beautiful little Jawa parked outside of a cafe here in Kayakoy.
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  6. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi Love my Tranny Super Supporter

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    We visited this site in 2015. And we later learned the history.
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  7. ScotsFire

    ScotsFire And then a drifter rode into town...

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    The Turkish flag is very interesting to me. Last November, when I was in Northern Cyprus, which is a breakaway "country" under Turkish protection, the Turkey flag is everywhere, far more often than the white Northern Republic of Cyprus flag, and always in the more honorary position.
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    I'm not at all surprised that there would be no, or a negative, reaction to suggesting to put up a Greek flag.
  8. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Having got to know quite a number of locals, has given us the great benefit of being told where to go. :lol3 Otherwise we would have also been none the wiser.
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  9. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    The more we travel ScotsFire the more I dislike nationalism. The flag waving, chest beating type that is really coming to the fore in many parts of the world in recent years. Europe was a big surprise to us, certain countries such as Poland & Hungary are particularly nationalistic at the present time.

    So far as Greece & Turkey goes, yeah they're been testy neighbors for a very long time, certainly at a political level thats for sure. Interesting thing about a divided Cyprus. There had been an Australian police, peace keeping force there for 53 years. They only pulled out in 2017. Back in 1963, Australia was one of the few countries that both Greece & Turkey agreed upon to be peace keepers. Not seen to be biased to one over the other and having friendly relations with both countries for a very long time.
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  10. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Deciding that the coast road was the better choice, we made our way south and east of Fethiye along some stunning roads. Goal of the day was to visit Karakoy, yep another ruin. On the G&K ruin scale, I think this one probably only musters a 3/10. Thats ok, any ruin is a good ruin in our closetted world.

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    Beautiful and hardly any traffic in sight. That road in the distance was ours in another 10 minutes. I will say though the ever present haze was and still is, as thick as ever.

    Karakoy has certainly seen better days. Not so grand and pretty rough around the edges.

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    The near pillar has clay replica freizes around the top. The originals now grace a museum somewhere in England if memory serves me correctly. The far pillar contains a family sarcophagos on top.

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    This collumn records and celebrates many victories in battle.

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    Entrance stage left of the theatre.

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    Bit rough around the edges for sure.

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    Then back on the road for a couple of perfect hours as we follow Med coast eastward.
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  11. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    Yes, that's definitely the route to take nowadays. Great views along there.

    In the British Museum (the "Harpy Tomb"):
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  12. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Ok, seems my memory cells are still mostly intact. It's a complex issue, antiquities now residing in western museums and one I'll leave well alone.
  13. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Next stop along the road was the Roman theatre of Aspendos. Where as Karakoy was the unloved child. Aspendos is stunning and considered one of the best preserved theatres anywhere. It compares with the one in Orange, France that we checked out nearly 20 years ago. What saved Aspendos, was that after the Romans left this part of the world the theatre became part of the overland caravan route or more commonly know as a caravanasie. These were sheltered stops along a trade route the most well known of course being the silk road, each one days walk to the next. Aspendos's theatre could entertain 15,000 patrons, certainly putting it into the major league.

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    I feel like I'm over doing the ruins a bit. But this is what Turkey is all about to a large extent and it's certainly what is taking up most of our day, besides trying to get decent wifi, sigh!
  14. Shaggie

    Shaggie Unseen University

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    Amazing!! :clap
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  15. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    Ramadan starts tomorrow. I don't know how much that will affect you. Possibly more in the conservative east of Turkey than it would in the west - you might need to be discreet in your eating and drinking. But travellers have a certain dispensation.
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  16. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Thanks Shaggie, but all the credit really goes to the subject matter. It's easy to get decent photos when you can shoot 2000 years of history.
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  17. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Yep, well aware DavidM1, both Kat and I see it as our Bi-annual weight loss programme. This time 2 years ago we were in Pakistan so we know what we are in for. We are currently in Cevlik and making our way east. So yes into the much more conservative part of Turkey. Our friends back on the Aegean coast certainly warned us that Ramadan will be in full swing.

    To be honest once we get into full touring mode we typically survive on just 2 meals a day, a decent breakfast and the evening meal.
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  18. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    The Taurus mountains run the full length of the Turkish Mediterraian coast and as much as we would like to run west to east through those mountains you can't really. That leaves you with the choice of following the coast all the way or travelling inland north of the mountains. Back in 2017 we did the former and pretty much just followed the coast, at least as far as Erdemli. This time we have taken sorties from time to time up into the mountains from the coast, both to enjoy the road and mountain scenery and of course to pick up another historical site or two. The next one on our extensive list was the Alahan monastery found just north of Mut. Apparently this site dates back to about 420 AD. Thats pretty damn early in Christianity thats for sure.

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    Maybe it was within those caverns that the real early monks or christians live, who knows?

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    This is the lesser of the two churches on site. Well whats left of it I guess.

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    Obviously the larger of the two churches.

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  19. gperkins

    gperkins graeme

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    Ok, next on the road to ruins was the Olbian aquaduct, then right next door is the Uzuncaburc Roman town. The more we explore these sites the more you marvel at the Roman acheivements. The combined effort and scale of these structures, temples, roads, aquaducts, cites, theatres and more is truly astonishing. Trying to imagine how it all looked back in the day is beyond my reckoning. Needless to say it must have been quite incredible.

    I've read that the aquaduct carried water for 32 klms and alternatively 20 klms, I don't know the truth, either way it's a hell of a distance a lot of it is cut into hill sides of course.

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    Heres a channeled block in which the water flowed. I estimated that the channel was about 16 inches across and 12 inches deep.

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    Somebody has pryed this tomb open years ago, I wonder what they found?

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    This could last days or centuries, who knows.

    Then it was a couple of Klm's down the road to Unzuncaburc.

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    Temple of Zeus. No self respecting city didn't have a temple to Zeus.

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  20. DavidM1

    DavidM1 Unicorn hunting

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    Great pics of Olba and Diocaesarea, much better than mine when I visited. I think I need a camera upgrade.
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