RTW the Jamie Z Way: Winter Hiatus in Phoenix

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by Jamie Z, Nov 29, 2020.

  1. PineyMountainRacing

    PineyMountainRacing Oops....

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    a clean rag or close knit sock will catch most contaminates, not water or diesel obviously, but enough dirt and junk to keep you running if you’re worried about sketchy fuel,
    #61
  2. SOLOKLR

    SOLOKLR Back to work

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    Leaving out of Denver in December? You are one tough bastard. Any contingency plan for a rental truck south?
    #62
  3. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    Boy, if I could get my crap together and leave Tuesday or Wednesday of next week, I'd be golden... but I just simply won't have everything ready to go by then. I'm set up for cold weather, though my kit has never been tested. Guess we'll see how it works. It certainly won't be the coldest weather I've ridden in.

    Screenshot_20201203-063124_AccuWeather.jpg
    #63
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  4. Vark

    Vark Long timer

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    Jamie Z,

    I remember when you were researching this bike and purchase, over on the CB500X forum. I was in the same mode as you (but not planning a big trip, just shopping for the CBX.) I ended up in a used GS afterall, but still smile every time I see a CBX. You made a great choice, imo.

    Funny, but I also went with the Givi Trekker cases. We must be like minded!

    On my bike, I went with a rear rack by Givi, that does not require any sort of adapter plate. My two cases (35 and 43L) both fit interchangeably in any position (left, right, top.)

    Was there no Givi rear rack available for the CBX? On my bike, Givi’s literature indicated I would need to use a different rack with adapter plate, but it turned out their own fitment info was incorrect. They had a direct fit rack with no adapter plate necessary for mounting the cases.

    Anyway, congrats to you for pushing on and following your dream. All the best.
    #64
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  5. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    Yes, Givi makes side and rear racks for the CBX, though when I purchased this bike in early 2020, Givi didn't have a specific kit for the 2019 model, which is very slightly different from the earlier bikes. People had been able to fit the side racks with a bit of modification.

    I actually ordered the Givi rear rack and had it here for a couple of weeks before I decided which direction I wanted to go. In the end, I decided on a SW Motech kit, for a couple of reasons. The SW Motech racks are slightly narrower. With my 33L cases attached, my bike is 36 inches wide. I wanted my bike to be about as narrow as possible. Also, the Givi racks just didn't look as robust, plus they would require some slight modification to fit the 2019 bike. I like Givi stuff; I've used it in the past. I just thought the SW Motech were a better solution.

    The Trekker cases are impressive. I just wish they didn't have that gimmicky 1/4 opening lid. Could save some weight and complexity if it had standard one-piece lids. I don't understand why they designed it like that. It's not useful for anything.
    #65
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  6. Ohio_Danimal

    Ohio_Danimal If I die trying, at least I tried Supporter

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    I’ll be arriving in Denver in a day or so. Would be great to chat a bit before you go.
    I won’t be mobile but will be staying next door to Woodys Wheel Works.
    If not, best of luck Jamie!
    #66
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  7. atomicalex

    atomicalex silly aluminium boxes Super Moderator Supporter

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    Thank you, Jamie! Have a good trip and I hope it goes super smooth!
    #67
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  8. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    Absolutely!

    I think Denver county has shut down all indoor dining, so maybe some carryout tacos and a six-pack of beer and we find a picnic table somewhere.
    #68
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  9. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

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    coleman fuel filter is small
    #69
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  10. Vark

    Vark Long timer

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    Copy that. I went all Givi (racks and cases),for the seamless integration. But I wasn’t contemplating a trip like yours, either.

    I really like the 1/4 opening option on the Trekker cases. When I use it as a sidecase, I have my smaller “downhill” case (the one on the same side as the sidestand) set-up for 1/4 opening, so it doesn’t dump its contents when I open it. I only put smaller items in it. The larger sidecase is on the uphill side, so I use the full opening and it doesn’t dump contents because of the bike’s angle on the sidestand.

    Btw, there is a less expensive Kappa version of the Trekkers that does not have the 1/4 opening feature. I paid more because I like the feature. It may grow on you...
    #70
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  11. Migolito

    Migolito Prognosticator and MotoYogi

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  12. Manray

    Manray Killing Time

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    Gas from gas stations will be fine for the CB all the way to the tip of South America. If you land in Africa, then start worrying about contaminated fuel. In anycase, the correct Guglatech filter for the CB500X is this one:

    Guglatech fuel filter CB500.jpg
    #72
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  13. Migolito

    Migolito Prognosticator and MotoYogi

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  14. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer

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    [​IMG]

    Best wishes for a fantastic trip Jamie. If I tried to explain how far bikes and equipment have developed since 1974 it would take all week. I'm glad that you have access to those developments.
    On this 3 month adventure in Mexico I left Minneapolis in February and the trip was punctuated by a bad accident and stealing my bike back from and impound yard. Good times.
    #74
  15. Migolito

    Migolito Prognosticator and MotoYogi

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    Mexico on a Norton....Epic!
    #75
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  16. steved57

    steved57 Long timer Supporter

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    I'm in and will be following along - ride safe and HAVE FUN
    #76
  17. Motardl1fe

    Motardl1fe I'm

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    Best of luck on your epic journey
    #77
  18. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    It's not 1974, and it's not Minneapolis in February, but my first ever motorcycle trip was on a borrowed 1982 Yamaha Virago 920. I didn't own any real motorcycle gear, so I wore whatever jeans and jacket I owned at the time. Rode it to visit family in Minnesota in the spring... probably had to be in 2001 or so.

    TravelPrints01.jpg

    Apparently I had a little ADV bug back then.

    TravelPrints08.jpg
    #78
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  19. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    Thanks for the question. I figured someone would eventually ask, and I have no problem with discussing money. I wanted to make a post about my budget, so I guess now is a good time. I intend to be fully transparent in all (most) aspects of this trip. I’m going to go into the weeds a bit in this post because budgeting for this trip has been a big part of my life for most of the last decade.

    Back when Brenda and I were talking about travel and I told her about my dream to ride a motorcycle around the world, she asked me how much it would cost. It was something I had never sat down to calculate. I just knew it was a lot more than I could ever afford.

    I gave it a few seconds of thought, then blurted out $20,000, thinking that this was a large enough number to impress upon Brenda the enormity of such a project. She gave me a quizzical look and asked me in her southern accent, “Is that all?”

    Immediately I realized that number was far too small. While I’m sure it’s possible to ride a motorcycle around the world--2-up even--for $20,000, to do so, you’d have to do it quickly and miss a bunch of stuff.

    For this trip I wanted to do it the Jamie Z way. There’d be no rush. We’d stop and see things along the way. Meet people. Try new foods. Find memorable camping spots.

    We determined that two years on the road would suit us, and I spent that evening coming up with an overall budget. It was mostly a guess, but I figured that $30,000 per year would do it. Plus add in an estimated $15,000 to outfit the both of us with all the gear we’d need, including an appropriate motorcycle. Total: $75,000.

    We figured between the two of us, we could save more than $3000 per month, plus some seed money we had. We were looking at leaving in under two years.

    But… as I’ve said, Brenda backed out. So I had a $75,000 mountain to climb on my own. I think at one point I calculated that it would take me close to twenty years to save that much. But there was no way I was *not* going on this ride. I already had the taste in my mouth.

    I did some recalculations. Without Brenda I could make the ride significantly cheaper... and I didn't have to go for two whole years. Eighteen months or even a year might be enough. By cutting a bunch of corners it was still possible, just not in the same monumental form that I had first envisioned.

    In 2015 I moved to Denver, found a good-paying job and was driving Uber on the side. I was then able to save significantly more each month, and consequently altered my stripped-down plans.

    My plans and ideas went through several iterations over the course of a few years; what I finally came up with was a budget of $20,000 per year, for three years, and the same $15,000 to acquire a motorcycle and all the gear I’d need. So I was back to the same $75,000 figure. Go figure!

    On average, I’ve been able to save about $900 per month over the past 7-plus years. Some months I was able to save much more than that, other months I saved nothing, and even had to pull money out of my savings a couple of times. I’ve had to push my start date back a few times in order to reach my savings goal. I have been able to put away this amount because I consciously live well below my means. I drive a 16-year-old car. I don’t go out much. I don’t eat fancy foods. My apartment is small and filled with furniture I bought on craigslist.

    I’ve made some sacrifices.

    That $20,000 per year budget is a wild estimate. It works out to be about $55 per day. I feel confident that I can live on much less than that on the road, but I also have to figure in periodic expenses like tires, and chain and sprockets, which I’ll need. And I’ll have to transport myself and my bike by sea or air a couple/few times at significant expense. If I’m skilled and lucky, I can live under budget and extend my trip beyond my initial three-year plan.

    So a few words of advice to someone who might be reading and find the thought of saving for a trip like this daunting: So did I. It looked impossible at the start. I never thought I’d get to this point. And further, you don’t need $75,000 to take a motorcycle trip. As Cal pointed out a few posts back, I’m very thorough, but that’s not necessary. In fact, my first epic motorcycle trip cost me under $2000. I just took the bike I had, the clothes and gear I already had, and I hit the road until my money ran out. Read some of Throttlemeister’s reports, or reports by JDowns, among others. Though I consider myself a budget traveler, those guys do it on a whole different level.

    This trip is the Jamie Z Way, and long ago I made the decision that I would spend the time and effort to save up to spend a little extra if I wanted to. I have to admit that researching and purchasing my gear has provided a lot of satisfaction over the past year. I hope that when my wheels hit the road, I can get into the budget travel mindset, because I don’t have to come home until the money runs out.

    Jamie
    #79
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  20. MrBob

    MrBob Long timer

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    Adventure travel was more about attitude than equipment back in the day.
    #80
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