RTW Trip - To ship my bike or to buy another one?

Discussion in 'Trip Planning' started by TundraOG, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. TundraOG

    TundraOG n00b

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2017
    Oddometer:
    8
    Hey guys. I'm planning a trip. The idea is to go from my home country of Israel to Greece via ship (Which isn't THAT expensive), ride around Europe, head to Russia via Scandinavia and from there to ride to Vladivostok and maybe Japan.

    Here's where it gets tricky - I'm thinking of maybe shipping the bike onward to North America (Canada/US), riding around those countries and finally either shipping it home to Israel or to Europe and riding it home from there.

    I've just started looking at prices and...holy cow, is it pricey to send a bike from Russia to North America! I'm honestly thinking it might be best to just buy a bike in the US and riding it there, but then the question comes to mind as to what to do with my own bike that I'll ride to Vladivostok.

    Will a smaller/lighter bike be cheaper to ship? I currently ride an NC700X which is fairly on the heavy side (210 kg wet if I recall correctly, that's without any additional luggage). If so, is the price difference that high?

    I don't want to go all the way to Vladivostok just to turn back around and ride home.

    Looking for advice from seasoned travelers! The shipping prices are literally thousands of dollars and cost roughly as most of my trip budget for Europe/Russia...
    #1
  2. Mark Manley

    Mark Manley Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2010
    Oddometer:
    2,737
    Location:
    Wessex, England
    I have shipped and flown my bikes, either a BMW R80GS or R80G/S quite a few times and there are ways of reducing the cost, sometimes head to a different port or share a container with others. I would paste in a link to the Horizonsunlimited vehicle shipping page but the site is undergoing maintainance at the moment.

    I don't know where you got your price but I believe there is a shipping agent in Vladivostok who most overlanders use for onward travel and I think his details are on the HUBB, which if you are not aware is probably a better source of information than here although it does not hurt to ask on both sites.

    There is always the option of crossing China into Nepal and India and continuing from there, pandemics notwithstanding, you do need a guide to cross China but they can be shared amongst groups of travellers and people team up to cross at the same time, the quickest route is through Xinjiang into Pakistan but as an Israeli that is probably not an option so you would need to go to Nepal.

    Your bike will be fine for the job but I would personally take something smaller, a Honda CRF250 or CB500X are good and popular choices for this type of trip, anything that cruises at 100kph will do it but smaller bikes are cheaper to run.

    https://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hubb/

    The HUBB is back up and here is there shipping page.

    https://www.horizonsunlimited.com/get-ready/shipping-the-bike
    #2
    Migolito and knight like this.
  3. MJS

    MJS Long timer

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,955
    Location:
    Off the grid in San Felipe, Baja
    You cannot leave your bike in Russia. Yuri at www.links-ltd.com is the import/export agent in Vladivostok. Ymelnik@links-ltd.com. Or you can take the ferry to Seoul.

    We shipped with Yuri to Los Angeles. Bikes went about 1 month after the estimated departure date. But we were consolidating to get a better price so had to wait for a few more bikes to fit into the container. Didn't matter to us as it was the return leg of our RTW. Another rider we met in Siberia took the ferry to Seoul and flew his bike to LA. Cost him about the same for shipping. Of course he had the additional travel expenses in Korea but since that was on his itinerary not an issue. Looking back wish we had done the same.
    #3
    Moto Mikey and knight like this.
  4. motoreiter

    motoreiter Long timer

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,337
    Location:
    Washington, DC
    If you decide to buy a bike in the US, be sure to research carefully how you'll register it, etc. In many states it can be a real pain for non-residents to do so, if not impossible. If you'll be in the US for a short time (30 days), you might be able to get by with temporary registration after you buy it, but I'm not sure what you'd do with the bike when that ran out...might be tricky if you plan to be crossing further borders. There are threads on this topic on HUBB, maybe here on ADV as well.
    #4
  5. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2005
    Oddometer:
    20,220
    Location:
    Villa Maria Sanitarium, Claremont, CA. USA
    I don't know about other States but ANYONE can have a vehicle registered in their name in California. You don't need to be a resident, citizen, of age, have a driving license, identification. All you need is an address to receive the title. You don't even need to be a person. You can use any name you like to register. You can even use two different names. Three names if you enter details in the lien section (Then the lien name will receive the title.) For crossing future borders/shipping you need to have a name on the title that matches your passport.
    #5
    Migolito likes this.
  6. vfrmike

    vfrmike Adventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2018
    Oddometer:
    57
    Location:
    jax
    Only problem with California is you get on their tax rolls, and can be hell trying to get off.
    #6
  7. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2005
    Oddometer:
    20,220
    Location:
    Villa Maria Sanitarium, Claremont, CA. USA
    That's a fact. Unless the next buyer registers the title in their name it's in your name regardless even if you send in a release of liability.
    #7