Russia, Kazakhstan, back to the UK on a wing and a prayer aboard an old Russkie Ural!

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by jayincanada, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. jayincanada

    jayincanada Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Oddometer:
    46
    Location:
    calgary alberta
    Heya!

    This ride report brought to you today from the letters W, T, and F. After the hardest part of the trip, trying to post this report, here it is courtesy of alternative FB photo hosting! So just a short write up about my trip around Kazakhstan and Russia aboard a Russian Ural sidecar affair. This is one of several trips like this I have made to date including India, Nepal, Se Asia, the Americas, and Europe on various bikes. Having ridden for years now but never owned a sidecar, I can attest now to the fact that the former has nothing to do with the later.

    Being from Canada, I can likely speak for many people in N America that Russia, is for many, a big mysterious black hole. And as such I felt compelled to post this RR as some people were asking about the feasibility of scooting over to Russkie land, acquiring a Ural, (or Ypan as it is known is Russia) and riding on home. I found lots of people who have taken an Ural back to Russia, but not from Russia. So despite the fact loads of people have done this trip, after searching the net for a good long while, all I seemed to find were empty, unanswered posts to questions. As usual, there was a lot of guessing, estimating, doomsday reporting and the like, but not much out there in the way of solid useable info. Like most things in this world, there is a good reason for that! :>

    The RR was written first in MS Word with embedded links to Photobucket, then copied and pasted to ADV. Not sure if that’s how’s it’s done, but here it is! Any comments on an easier way to this would be appreciated.



    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>

    So I&#8217;ll clear some mystery, and then post some pix from the trip.

    Before going any further, one needs to obviously register the bike in Russia. I do not claim to be an expert from doing this once, but these are the things I needed before having brand new Russkie plates in my name:

    English speaking Russian willing to help.
    International DL
    Passport with a business visa
    Registration in Russia at a Russian address for the period you will be riding in Russia. The post office supplies this service.
    Insurance for the bike (when bought in Russia, its cheap BTW)
    The police need to check that the numbers on the frame and motor match the current paperwork.
    Original paperwork for the bike.
    2 days of running about and around $100 in fees for plates, admin costs, insurance, bribes, registration and other bs


    Contrary to popular belief, there is no problem departing Russia with a Russian vehicle on a foreign ownership, so long as all the paperwork for the exiting vehicle and occupants is in order. Hence having the paperwork in order is paramount, and I suspect this is where some urban myths/horror stories from the road have derived from. The seemingly bored Russian police have a hard on for foreign tourists traveling on farm bikes and get very excited at the prospect of scrutinizing the paperwork. My personal roadside police spot check record was 11 times in one day. I would guess this is because most locals ride the farm bikes around the village, may not have paperwork, and therefore never take these things on the asphalt. The green card insurance for the EU countries can be purchased at Russian gas stations at the border, and is very cheap compared to purchasing the same thing on the EU side. Find a helper. The very nice biker that helped me was a Russian citizen who sold used cars for a living and it still took him 2 full days of running around.

    Besides the political side of things, I would also recommend a strong mechanical aptitude, a willingness to sleep anywhere beside a broken Ural, an outgoing social personality, and maybe rose tinted spectacles might come in handy.

    A few similar stories from people that made the same sort of trip:
    http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/hubb/europe/buying-ural-bike-eastern-europe-21232
    http://www.horizonsunlimited.com/tstories/romriell/

    Ural dealer in Moscow:
    http://www.mcasta.ru/eng/mainhome2.htm
    Although on the phone they said they do not stock Ural but can get one within 20 days for around $10,000 usd. They are (allegedly) located by the state university in Moscow. It&#8217;s interesting to note there are no official Ural dealerships in Russia. The factory sold 5 units last year to the domestic market. This dealer said they do not stock any units and but could obtain a new Ural on a per order basis only.

    Here are some bike pix and various other random pix from hanging out in Moscow. I had the use of a F650 BMW for a few days and took advantage of it. After Moscow, the bike scene seems to disappear.



    Honda Rune with airbrushing:


    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>





    There are 7 of these buildings in Moscow from the days of Stalin. They look like something out of Gotham city in the Batman flix&#8230;

    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>



    Nicest metro stations on the planet:



    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>



    Matt black Land Rover:

    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>



    I seen one of these R8&#8217;s being driven hard in Moscow and of the gold plated variety. Then I seen it advertised on English Russia here:
    http://englishrussia.com/index.php/2010/07/15/weird-russian-cars-of-ex-ussr/


    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>


    At the Moscow state university in the summer evenings, hoards of people, musicians, families, bikers, skateboarders, dancers, you name it congregate on the boulevard out front overlooking Moscow. Beer and snack shops are plentiful and a really good range of about 2-300 bikes turned out the three times I visited this summer. A trend here with the Wings is to deck them out with a loud, high quality sound system cranking out techno or hard rock, airbrush Hollywood themes complimented with LED&#8217;s and ride about Moscow sans helmet. Cool.

    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>


    A few Urals managed to wander in:


    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>This one, I think is a Dneper, not a Ural....
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>

    Another great hangout when in Moscow is the Sexton bar run by a local bike club. Truly unforgettable and highly recommended it is a really great hangout for bikers and the like.

    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <table style="width: auto;"><tbody><tr><td>[​IMG]</td></tr><tr><td style="font-family: arial,sans-serif; font-size: 11px; text-align: right;">From Russia</td></tr></tbody></table>
    <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:punctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if !mso]><object classid="clsid:38481807-CA0E-42D2-BF39-B33AF135CC4D" id=ieooui></object> <style> st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } </style> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} </style> <![endif]-->
    #1
  2. jayincanada

    jayincanada Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Oddometer:
    46
    Location:
    calgary alberta
    Anyways,….out of the frying pan and into the fire as the saying goes! :>

    [​IMG]

    This summer, after finishing a job in Moscow, it seemed to me like a good idea to buy a Ural motorcycle in Russia and ride it back to London with no Russian language skills or map. After a few days of scheming, ‘planning’, downloading maps for my Garmin from torrents, and browsing the net for motorcycles, it was clear that I already had all the prerequisites for a serious motorcycle trip: a Russian buisness visa for 6 months, goggles, gloves and a motorcycle helmet.

    So I’m hanging around this hostel, called the Basillica in Moscow, where I meet this young student named Artjov who was trying out for the Moscow State Uni there. Turns out he's from Latvia and speaks nice Russkie and English as his father was stationed in Baikinour back when.. And he's willing to help me out with a train ticket and phoning about to various ads on the Russian classifieds courtesy of the World Wide Web. So after finding what looks to be a nice example of a 1988 Ural M8103 with relevant documents out in Kirov (and after mulling about it over an expensive Moscow coffee) I was off that evening on a train heading 1000kms east of Moscow.


    http://www.moto.auto.ru/ Russian classifieds

    There was a couple on the train, a German fellow with his Russian girlfriend who made for nice company during the ride. I mean conversation. With both of them. Never mind. It was an overnight train so the journey seemed much shorter than 1000+kms. Outside in the blackness, one could see the little villages passing by, pine forests and abundant country roads and my excitement to get out there was nearly unbearable. I did not know who to look for at the platform the next morning, but was greeted by a member from a local Kirov motorcycle club on the platform. From there we hoped into a nice BMW and headed for the clubhouse where instead of seeing the bike, we had a good party session for the next few days. The paperwork took just as long, and on the 6<sup>th</sup> day, I was ready to leave.


    Here she is in front of me as advertised, as is, where is….In Kirov :>

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    An old IZH in remarkable condition. These bikes were used as city bikes, both my Ural and this IZH. It is an important distinction when buying one in Russia. A former farm bike is not what you want.
    [​IMG]








    This picture portrays nicely my experience of buying a motorcycle in Russia.


    [​IMG]


    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Bidding farewell, I rode off on my new (to me) Ural into the sunset that evening. One of the bikers followed me in a car well outside the city limits. He kept asking with a slightly worried look if I was sure I wanted to do this. Which made me nervous. Had something been ‘repaired’ prompting the sale I should know about? Was there a robbery setup ahead? Did I seem that incompetent and ignorant?

    About 20kms from Kirov I spent my first time on the side of the road, not knowing that the reverse gear when engaged, does not allow for the neutral to be selected. No big deal. 10 minutes of fiddling and then off again. It was relief to find out my ignorance of the bike was to fault.

    Another 20kms later a call to nature seen the bike parked in the forest down a bit of a trail. Came back, and the Ural held its first official rebellion. After several minutes kicking, out came the tools. Carbs were dismantled, points fiddled with, desperation set in and 40 minutes of unwanted exercise ensued as the push starting session began. Five hours later some villagers and I were pushing the bike back to a Dacha to stay the night with the locals. Next morning, fed and rested, a local farmer was called to engage in some back yard mechanics. Back yard mechanics…no…Back farm mechanics. No, back wild forest in the dacha mechanics.

    [​IMG]


    Ural lesson #1:
    Whatever you have learned about working on modern motorcycles should be immediately forgotten. This machine is a farm implement through and through. All it requires is a hammer, adjustable wrench, and flat blade screwdriver.

    Back in Kirov, a Ural mechanic was brought in to fiddle with the bike, as the plugs were sooty and the points not consistently working. Another few days in Kirov, then back to another attempt to break the 40km record outside of Kirov. Back on the road the bike was faltering and still running too rich. But fuel in Russia is cheap at 70cents/liter and it was eating the fuel well enough past idle to get 200kms that evening. The next day, I tore into the bike and fixed the carburetors by trial and error and doing plug cuts after the runs. It was tedious, but the only way I was going to live with temperamental carbs for the next 2 months. The carbs would constantly be out of adjustment every few days in Kazakhstan because of the rough roads (or lack of a road) and lack of nice suspension, so the time spent doing this really paid off in the end.

    Ural lesson #218:
    The adjusted length of the fuel needle on a K63 series carb is 73mm.

    Jetting the carbs is easy when one has a basis to work from, but I had no idea if the jet numbers and needles were proper original parts. It did not help to have a manual in Russian either. A set of new K68 carbs were purchased for $40.00, but they never worked right, over fueling. Looking back, I think they were for a 2 stroke IZH or something else 2 stroke and they sat in the trunk for the rest of the journey. The existing K63’s had 160 mains, the K68 had 190 mains. And there was no guarantee what those numbers stood for. The problem was that I couldn’t find a box of various mains in any of the stores. Ural parts were usually found in glass cases in bicycle shops in Russia, oddly enough. And all they had was carb repair kits, which contained the same jets. I even swapped the 160’s into the K68, but to no avail. And when buying these parts, it is interesting to note most of the crap is from China. As if the Russian stuff is not bad enough. So there is no guarantee that the air passageways on the K68’s were big enough. Furthermore, upon closer inspection of the carb gaskets that were purchased with the carbs, the intake hole on the gasket did not match the intake throat, effectively reducing the flow and diameter by about 3mm! I ended up making my own gaskets out of cardboard.

    Ural lesson #95:
    Ural parts purchased in Russia are often poor quality Chinese copies, not stuff manufactured in Irbit. Everything with these parts is suspect.



    So off to Kazakhstan! :>>>


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    It’s definitely one bent up wheel from a Ural…

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]






    The rest of the ride down to the border of Kazakhstan was fortunately uneventful for the most part. It was amazing to see all the villages seemingly abandoned. Smatterings of dilapidated, tilting cabins grouped together in a loosely organized fashion. Some were burnt out, others simply collapsed. I have seen people living in one half of a burnt out cabin (dacha) which is apparently normal. This one was so crooked, the curtains clearly hung contrary to the sills!


    [​IMG]



    For maps, I used Garmin’s Russian roads both version 4 and 5. I found these to be very adequate and got me into many nice back roads in Russia. With that said though, the auto routing was unreliable big time, and had to be constantly monitored.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    #2
  3. jayincanada

    jayincanada Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2010
    Oddometer:
    46
    Location:
    calgary alberta
    <!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:punctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> </w:Compatibility> <w:BrowserLevel>MicrosoftInternetExplorer4</w:BrowserLevel> </w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" LatentStyleCount="156"> </w:LatentStyles> </xml><![endif]--><!--[if !mso]><object classid="clsid:38481807-CA0E-42D2-BF39-B33AF135CC4D" id=ieooui></object> <style> st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } </style> <![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 10]> <style> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} </style> <![endif]--> Finally, at the border. The road was great for about 3 miles into Kazakhstan, into the first village. The nice asphalt ended within the village, and stayed that way for the rest of my time in Kazakhstan. Any scrap of nice pavement was quickly outweighed by several miles of horrendous road that ranged from almost bearable, to full 4x4 quality. Sidecars do not accommodate rough terrain very well at speed. The old Ural was akin to a bad handling car, but without the protection. Or sort of like riding in a dump truck. A TRX450 Honda would be much, much better for this sort of thing. Or a Landcruiser. That would have been very, very nice. :>

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]



    The roads were really awful. The sand in places was like flour, it coated everything. Much of this was once underneath water. There seemed to be sporadic construction taking place for the main roads here and there. It must be hard for commerce to grow and improve the wealth of the country when moving goods around is such a nightmare. I think the ‘leaders’ must be quite happy to pocket the proceeds from the Caspian oil fields and just fly themselves everywhere.


    [​IMG]



    These little cafes are every now and then along the Kazak roads. They may not look like much, but at the time they are a very welcome oasis. There is often a bed outside to keep you off the ground, breakfast, and coffee. Some have showers as well for weary travelers, all for a dollar or two.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Someone had stripped this car bare & clean before the skid marks in the dirt had a chance to disappear.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]





    An old Ural waiting for some love. These bikes were very common in the small villages everywhere I went.

    [​IMG]


    The Urals get pretty rough over the years.


    [​IMG]
    #3
  4. GB

    GB . Administrator Super Moderator Super Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2002
    Oddometer:
    70,021
    Awesome ride, report and pics!! :clap Thanks for taking us along.. I'm going to sticky this one to garner the attention it deserves :thumb One advantage or riding the old Ural is that every shade tree mechanic in the old USSR knows how to fix it as you found out.

    p.s. Doing the report in Word works well most of the time. Spread out your posts to give inmates a chance to catch up next time.. and a few more pics won't hurt now that you have a captive audience.
    #4
  5. patiodadio

    patiodadio Motorcyclist

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Oddometer:
    385
    Location:
    Backwoods of Kentucky
    Thanks for sharing ! Great ride report , loved the tour of the Ural factory !
    #5
  6. EnginTMR

    EnginTMR Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Oddometer:
    10
    Location:
    İstanbul
    It's cool.... Thanks for your sharings :clap:clap
    #6
  7. Donogh

    Donogh Adventurer

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    71
    Location:
    Moscow, Russia
    Hey, you are really brave man! Even russian bikers ride japanese bikes, if it`s possible:D

    Also I want to notice, that modern 750 ccm Gear-ups is very different than old 650 ccm 103.10 model. Modern Urals is for trading outside Russia only, with little exceptions. And it`s cranckcase is russian-made in 750 only, unfortunately. Or, may be, fortunately? :lol3
    #7
  8. yamalama

    yamalama wet coaster

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2008
    Oddometer:
    3,294
    Location:
    north vancouver bc
    nicely done.
    thank you.
    #8
  9. thomas.tc.young

    thomas.tc.young Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2010
    Oddometer:
    917
    Location:
    Seattle
    thanks for sharing, your RR was pretty cool
    #9
  10. lukeman

    lukeman Cool Hand

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Oddometer:
    468
    Location:
    Washington DC
    Great report. The urban decay shots are both haunting and captivating at the same time. Quite a contrast to Moscow. Thanks for the shots of the Ural factory, really interesting. :D
    #10
  11. larryboy

    larryboy Stable genius.

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2005
    Oddometer:
    28,364
    Location:
    Über Alles,California
    Great report!! Thanks for sticking this one up top Gadget Boy, I would have missed it. :thumb
    #11
  12. Jantje

    Jantje ADW - Adv/Wheels

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2007
    Oddometer:
    31
    Location:
    Alberta/Canuckistan :)
    Great report..love the attitude. riding and the "unplanned" adventure go together. Keep up to good work.
    #12
  13. Gregster

    Gregster Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2005
    Oddometer:
    999
    Location:
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Fantastic :clap
    #13
  14. pelvis_98

    pelvis_98 Havin A Time

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
    3,159
    Location:
    Oxford Station, Ontario
    Thanks for the RR:clap
    #14
  15. achesley

    achesley Old Motorcyclist

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,567
    Location:
    Jennings, Louisiana
    Awesome report and pictures. Thanks for sharing. Just amazed by the old USSR.
    #15
  16. TexanInSeattle

    TexanInSeattle Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Oddometer:
    325
    Location:
    Somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert
    #16
  17. KHVol

    KHVol Long timer Supporter

    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Oddometer:
    2,582
    Nice RR...you guys ae making me want to get one of these Ural sidehack things...
    #17
  18. WarLlama

    WarLlama belligerent cameloid

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2005
    Oddometer:
    45,434
    Location:
    twixt & tween
    Nice report! Thanks for sharing. :clap

    Gotta call fake on these though, they are just too perky. :lol3

    [​IMG]
    #18
  19. Nathan

    Nathan Why I laugh?

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2004
    Oddometer:
    567
    Location:
    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Brilliant! :clap
    #19
  20. Peter GG

    Peter GG Peter GG

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2009
    Oddometer:
    376
    Location:
    Brisbane Australia
    Great pics mate..
    #20