Russia, Mongolia, Stans & Beyond - On a GSXR

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by 7days1shower, May 21, 2019.

  1. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    - GOODBYE RUSSIA, HELLO KAZAKHSTAN -

    Today was the day I finally leave Russia for good after my 2nd entry into the country (travelling on a double entry business visa). Unlike others on a 1 year multiple entry visa, I don’t have the option to change up my plans if I feel like it and enter back in.

    I was truly going to be sad to leave as although I had started off in Vladivostok apprehensively about how crazy Russian roads and traffic would be I had grown to love the country while travelling through Siberia for everything from its varied landscapes, friendly people and great food.

    I had been taken in by bikers to their homes, had my bike looked after and in broken English and Russian, had some great conversations.

    It was also a sense of familiarity that I was leaving as I understood Russian to some extent and moving on meant starting anew from learning how to say hello and thank you, knowing what food to eat and even just day to day things on the road.

    For example, filling fuel in Russia requires you to specify how many litres you want and paying upfront. Now with a bike, I usually just want it to be filled to full so whilst in some cases this can just be done by leaving a large cash amount or card as bond, some attendants flat out refuse until you specify an amount and pay for it. A headache but again, familiar.

    There were the nice things as well like the custom followed by most drivers to turn on the hazard lights if you allow them to pass as a thank you. Of course, I would curse them in my head if I let them pass and they didn’t thank me!

    A last look back at Russia

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    It didn’t help that the things I had been preparing for the next country, Kazakhstan, weren’t all that great; a direct route from the Semey border to Almaty of 1200km was 800km of road so bad that people were breaking bike frames and wheels, a barren landscape, corrupt police that were ready to pounce.

    Thankfully, I had done my research yet again and validated with others that a longer, 1000km longer, route was possible down south to Almaty via the capital city of Nur Sultan (previously known as Astana). This would eat up some time and effort but hopefully save the bike.

    At the last minute, I also decided to drop the idea of the smaller border crossing into Kazakhstan through Shemonaika, which was supposed to be much quicker than the main crossing, due to hearing about road conditions and headed to the main border of Semey.

    Again, through some research I found that just before the border is a small town where the main business seems to be selling insurance. The first of these little booths seems to be the popular option with a very friendly lady who offers tea and biscuits while you wait. Probably paying a slight premium but all in all, only 1600rubles for a months insurance

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    The border process was once again very quick despite horror stories and both Russian and Kazakh sides were done within 1 hour and 15 minutes. A quick chat with the Kazakh soldiers with a lesson in saying hello (asalam aleikum) seemed to indicate that this was going to be a predominantly Islamic nation.

    Lining up before the Russian side

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    In Kazakhstan!

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    As we stopped for some water right after the border, a lone rider approached us from the other side; a German on a GS1200 named Oliver.

    For the past few days I had been wondering if I should attempt taking on the Pamir and trying to gather as much information as possible on road, fuel and weather conditions. Oliver in one conversation was able to alleviate all my concerns and helped me finalise my decision; I will attempt the Pamir!

    In return, I was able to try and give him some information on Russia and more importantly, Mongolia. Of course, I also gave him a sticker and toy kangaroo!

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    Unfortunately, from there on, it seemed that the stories of Kazakhstan were starting to be realised as although the road was paved, it was of fairly poor condition with every bump and hole sending a jolt through the bike and me.

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    However all along the way, it seemed many Kazakhs were very fond of bikers as a loud beep would suddenly warn me of a car next to me with someone hanging out the window waving enthusiastically

    Pulling into Semey, without a SIM card, we started looking for accommodation. The first place; fancy but too expensive, keep looking. The 2nd place had a standard room for one person for 6000 tenge and a double luxury room for 9000 tenge.

    I decided to opt for the standard room but had to pay an extra 700 tenge for breakfast whilst the Japanese bikers shared the luxury room which had breakfast included!

    Next order of business; food! But with no money, this meant that an ATM had to come first.

    One of my favourite activities in any new country is to go looking for a basic necessity such as a SIM card as It often leads to fun discoveries.

    In this case, my first Kazah food at a fast food joint where I opted for an unknown snack rather than chicken nuggets and was rewarded with a delicious pastry filled with meat.

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    Buying the SIM card itself was an experience as the 1 hour wait to get it activated lead to a great conversation with Azhar who ran a gold shop and Evgeny who ran the phone shop. All through Google Translate of course.

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    From there, dinner. I did try to have some more Kazakh food (shashlik) but ended up with Uzbek plov (which turned out to be so delicious, I had 2 plates)

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    A good bed to sleep in, delicious food, friendly people; maybe Kazakhstan wasn’t going to be so bad after all
    #81
  2. LC4Dakar

    LC4Dakar Been here awhile Super Supporter

    Joined:
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    Location:
    SF Bay Area and Las Cruces, NM
    The best Irish Coffee I've ever had was in a hotel in Barnaul. Wish I could remember the name.
    #82
    Lost Cartographer likes this.
  3. LC4Dakar

    LC4Dakar Been here awhile Super Supporter

    Joined:
    May 10, 2006
    Oddometer:
    952
    Location:
    SF Bay Area and Las Cruces, NM
    The roads between Semey and Astana were good 10 years ago. Just a little roller coastey.
    Most other Kazakh roads were a tossup between using the highway or the dirt road next to it.

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    #83
  4. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    - West through Kazakhstan -

    It seems that roads heading in and out of a city are fairly poor but everything in between is great! (So far)

    Heading from Semey, west, to Pavlodar was no different

    Anticipated a hot day at 36c but luckily cloud cover kept things fairly decent

    The 340km that would’ve otherwise felt big actually seemed ok so going to try a 440km push to the capital of Nur Sultan (formerly known as Astana) tomorrow

    No Mongolian cowboys wanting photos with the bike any more

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    I had seen this bike in the hotel parking in the morning but it was gone by the time I was ready to set off

    A crazy Korean guy taking 5 years to ride around the world

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    Roadside produce

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    Lunch break

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    Many rest stops in Russia have these bays for people to work on their vehicle

    Seems Kazakhstan follows suit

    In this case the guy seemed to be pulling down on something near the gearbox and then beating the hell out of it with a big hammer

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    Dinner in Pavlodar; dump of a hotel but giant shaslik made up for it

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    #84
  5. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    - To the capital! -

    Since I’m avoiding the road to head directly south to Almaty, I need to head further west towards the capital city of Nur Sultan (although it seems locals refuse to recognise it as anything other than Astana)

    A quick stop by the mosque in Pavlodar before heading out of the city

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    Based on yesterday’s smooth ride, I decided to scrap my plan of a 2 day ride and try to do the whole 440km in one go. Then take an extra day to explore what is supposed to be a cool city

    As soon as we got on the first highway (A17), the construction began.

    This meant not only diversions but speed limit is reduced to 40 down from 90

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    It seemed that the reputation of harsh police enforcement was true to as nearly every local slowed right down!

    At this pace it seemed near impossible to be able to complete this is a day but after nearly 250km of pain the road changed; we were now on the P4

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    And life on the P4 was good! Perfect dual carriageway and a 120kmh limit; time for the GSXR to open up a little!

    Coming into Astana, I got the usual waves, honks and thumbs up that now seemed commonplace in Kazakhstan and it indeed looked like a very clean and modern city

    Only problem was, I couldn’t find the entrance to the hotel despite circling it twice!

    But again, friendly Kazakh people to the rescue. A lady and her daughter in a black Range Rover got us to follow them right up to the hotel

    A hot shower, good dinner and great bed to get ready for a big day of walking and exploring tomorrow!
    #85
  6. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    - NEW FAVOURITE COUNTRY & CITY –

    The plan for the day off in Astana was to walk around and explore the city.

    However, the night before, I had been lying in bed scrolling through Instagram and come across the page for Astana Bikers. After a couple of quick messages back and forth with the page owner, Darkhan (who rides both an immaculate Goldwing and also an Aprillia RSV4), it was decided that walking about 10km in predicted 37c heat was a terrible idea and Darkhan would instead come by to pick me up and drive me around

    First thing next morning, I shot him a message to let him know that the Japanese bikers were looking for an accessories shop for new gloves and within 15 minutes, another biker, Mikhail, was at our front door.

    Turns out there is a large biker WhatsApp group and the news of traveling riders needing assistance had gone out en masse.

    While Darkhan took me out for a drive in the city, the Japanese guys were taken to Mikhails home and told to choose from his own gloves for pairs that would fit them!

    I on the other hand was busy being amazed by the hyper-modern and amazing city that is Astana.

    Coming into Kazakhstan, I had very low expectations and a hot and dusty steppe and not much else to do. However I’m so glad the direct road to Almaty is bad which has made me come through Astana.

    The city is extremely clean with wide and perfect roads and almost every building is architecturally beautiful.

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    Arc De Triomphe... Astana

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    Entire residential areas are styled in distinct French, Italian or other European styles; large restaurants are housed in huge buildings styled to look like landmarks from their home countries such as Azerbaijan, South Korea, Uzbekistan and Japan.

    However it’s not all about imitation, while even the simplest buildings re beautiful, the city boasts more concert halls, stadiums, museums and other arenas than I could ever hope to visit in months of living here all interspersed amongst ornate mosques.

    You’ll have to excuse my photos as most were taken from a moving car; it was simply way too hot to be out.

    Going far beyond the term of being hospitable, Darkhan treated me to a light and refreshing lunch before dropping me back to my place. But not before telling me to make sure to be ready by 10pm so we could head to the local bikers meeting where a large group of Astanas’ sportbikers would be waiting to meet me and see the Aussie GSXR!

    Lunch with Darkhan, cool and refreshing acroshka with lime and mint juice

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    These guys were crazy, reaching well in excess of 150kmh on the street with no regard for speed cameras flashing away like strobe lights. I hung back with the Goldwing...

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    A final parting gift; a patch from Astana Motorcyclists!

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    #86
  7. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,545
    Location:
    SW. Idaho
    just read your comment on the HUBB, did check your drive sprocket, can turn it over if need be .?
    #87
  8. Convoluto

    Convoluto Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2019
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    Location:
    Iberian Peninsula
    7days1shower, just to let you know I'm glued to this thread and your adventure. The more people you bring into your photos, the better it gets. Also, the nature scenarios are amazing. I look forward to know more about the Japanese guy in the Honda Monkey. You both make a good pair of what-ever-it-takes adventurists.
    #88
  9. 08StangGT_CS

    08StangGT_CS Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2018
    Oddometer:
    112
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX and Beyond
    Great ride report. Only complain is I ordered a pizza because of you. I’m in for the rest of the trip.
    #89
  10. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    If you mean the front sprocket, nope! I havent checked it because honestly its a bit of a pain in the ass to get to. I probably should hey...

    I probably havent had pizza in years before this trip, now suddenly its all I crave!
    #90
    08StangGT_CS likes this.
  11. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    The road from Astana to Karganda was even better than expected!

    A photo of a gas station attendant in Astana; Ablai is originally from Taraz and spoke great English! He was very excited to see us as it was his first time meeting travellers. So it made me very happy to give him a kangaroo keyring to remember the travellers by

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    While I had information that it was motorway, I was expecting to be around 250km as per Google

    As the signs started indicating only 170km, I started thinking, ok, this is going to be a super short day

    In the first hour, I blasted along at 120kmh and decided to stop for some water.

    I’d mentioned before about the roadside bays where people could work on their cars but had only seen them used occasionally.

    So when I saw an Audi up on the ramps with a gearbox lying next to it, I went for a closer look.

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    As I walked around, a guy popped out from underneath asking for a cigarette; sorry, haven’t got one

    But slowly, we started talking more. As the gearbox to the side would indicate, Uslan was having transmission issues with his old Audi.

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    I saw him struggling with a wrench to get a bolt off so I ran back to my bike to get a breaker bar; perfect! It was off

    But now he needed a specific sized allen key to get the driveshafts off. We tried every tool I had and when the Japanese bikers pulled up behind me, we rummaged through their toolkits as well to no avail.

    It wasn’t too hot today but still hot enough for someone pulling a gearbox on the side of the road; I gave Uslan one of my bottles of water.

    But this part needed to come off. Maybe from the outer side? So off came the wheel and Uslan once again started trying various methods which included big hammers and planks of wood. Finally, with enough force, it was off!

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    At this point, I was now officially employed in the process after being given my own set of gloves to help prop up the gearbox while he undid the final bolts.

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    As I held up the gearbox from the rear with oil dripping all over me, it seemed it was now hanging by some feed/drain lines only.

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    I stepped away as Uslan went around finding various bolts and screws and just when my head was turned, it fell to the ground with an almighty thud. Success!

    It had been a couple of hours now since I first pulled up so after checking that he didn’t need any further help, I finally took off again.

    Every time I think it’s going to be a short simple ride, the day always finds something interesting to send my way
    #91
  12. oldbeer

    oldbeer Grandadventurer

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2017
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    Location:
    Tamaki Makarau, Aotearoa
    Mate...you're a legend.
    #92
    Lukeb likes this.
  13. Convoluto

    Convoluto Adventurer

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    Aug 16, 2019
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    Location:
    Iberian Peninsula
    Hahaha! Totally unexpected turn of events. Very nice. I envy your boldness.
    #93
  14. Bigguy136

    Bigguy136 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2017
    Oddometer:
    254
    Loving your RR
    I also road raced (17 years) and been adv riding since. I've been ride a super tenere around north America but I'm starting to think about Russia, Mongolia and such in the next few years. I still have my last race bike (SV650) and it's the original carb model. With all I hear about fuel and such, a simple vacuum style fuel pump and carbs would be good. This bike is also a bit lighter than my super tenere. The only thing that I'm a bit concerned about are the rims. I feel spoke rims are much stronger for pot holes. Have you noticed any damage to your cast aluminum rims? Anyone you came across have any broken cast rims?
    #94
  15. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Thankfully not damage to my wheels as yet and I hope it stays that way!

    Although Ive been worried when Ive hit some big holes the most I've actually hit is my headers bottoming out once

    Im also a bit worried about no sump protection but so far so good

    I've met a guy who buckled both rims in Uzbekistan on his VStrom and know of an NZ couple who damaged both their wheels in Mongolia on the same route I took on their GS1200

    I guess just taking it slow and having luck on your side is whats needed!
    #95
  16. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    - THE LONG WAY AROUND (TO ALMATY) –

    I’ve now been in Almaty for over a week so I guess better get to it and finish the write up of how I actually got here!

    As mentioned previously, the direct road, of 1200km, from The Russian/Kazakh border at Semey to Almaty was said to be so bad that it broke peoples frames and suspension.

    So, I am taking the longer, 2500km, route around; the last 600km of which is said to be quite full of nothingness with a 200km patch said to be quite rough.

    The first 400km stretch from Karaganda to Balkhash was fair although the road did change from a dual carriageway to a single lane each way.

    The road out of Karaganda; going to be a lot nicer to do this stretch once construction has been completed in 2023

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    As I ride through the desolate nothingness, I wondered how it would have been in the days of the Silk Road caravans; moving slowly through the heat

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    Road condition starts degrading

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    Vast open nothingness

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    The town of Balkhash itself was very chill with many people out and about in the evening by the lake side

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    The following morning, we set out again for the first half of the 600km stretch that was said to be quite bare in terms of amenities such as fuel, accommodation and food.

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    While the road was still decent, finding a place to stay for the night proved challenging.

    At first, I thought to try and camp by the lake and ventured in 7km off the main road down a heavily corrugated road.

    Getting to the lake proved antclimatic as the shore was littered with garbage and there was simply no shade at all. It also didn’t help that iOverlander reports of campsites nearby had wolf sightings too!

    A small village water pumping station en route to trying to find the campsite

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    Ok, onto the next option; there was a small town nearby that listed 2 gastinitsas or the café on the main road where we had turned off may have some rooms too.

    We decided to venture another 5km down terrible roads only to find a real dump of a town wanting exorbitant prices!

    Back to the highway we go for option 3; the road was still heavily corrugated but I was a little fed up at this point so the bike took the brunt of my mood, flying over the bigger corrugations at 50kmh.

    Finally back at the café on the main road, they had some rooms attached to the café but no shoers, no toilets and no airconditioning. However, at $5 a night, it’d do just fine.

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    A namazkhana at the truck stop; prayer room

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    Over dinner at the café we met a Czech biker coming from the opposite direction who described the road as “sh*t, sh*t and more sh*t”; this was a little worrying. We also provided her some road advice on Mongolia as she was having second thoughts on whether she would be able to do it.

    This friendly police officer came to our table and we all went quiet, thinking, what have we done?! Turns out he just wanted to talk. He had studied in Boston but was now a police officer. We spoke about what Kazakh roads and speeding fines were like and whether Kazakh police were corrupt

    His answer, “Oh I’m too shy to answer that!”

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    Unfortunately the nights sleep wasn’t great with trucks constantly coming and going all night along with a room that was quite warm.

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    Luckily we got a room just in time as this sign of "no more rooms went up shortly after!

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    The following morning we set off and within 20km, the road turned bad. It was still single lane tarmac, however, it was very damaged.

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    As we travelled along though, it wasn’t anywhere near as bad as had been described by the Czech girl. It was slow for sure, but manageable.

    Finally, about 100km outside Almaty, the road improved and to my surprise, the horizon filled with the sight of snow capped mountain ranges.

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    If this was any indication to go by, the next 4 nights I’d booked in Almaty were going to be a great place to rest and recover!
    #96
    mikegc, Saso, AngusMcL and 9 others like this.
  17. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    - ALMATY (PART ONE) -

    What a city!

    The first night started off right with finding a café next to the hotel that had some killer shashlik; looks like it’ll become the ‘úsual’ meal spot

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    Dinner with Yosuke and Hide who have been with me since the end of Mongolia and Brian from Denmark who I had been speaking with on Facebook to form a group to cross China but we happened to arrive in Almaty at the same time

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    The first full day I had pencilled to get the bike sorted starting with changing this damn front tyre I’ve been lugging around since Barnaul

    Now one thing I forgot to mention in my last update is that on the last stretch to Almaty, I spotted a crack in the rear tail plastic underneath where the tyre was sitting.

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    Of course, how could I have been so silly. The tyre was resting loosely on the actual plastics rather that on the subframe like the luggage.

    The last stretch of bad tarmac and the abuse on corrugated roads while trying to find camp must have caused the tyre to smack the plastic and crack the tail.

    No big deal, in my mind I was already thinking of a couple of ways to fix it

    1. Just duct tape the whole thing up, just a crack so it won’t be that bad
    2. Drill some holes and stitch the crack up with zip-ties
    3. Find a plastic welding place
    4. Seeing as Kazakhstan is full of sportbikes and Almaty is bound to have even more, maybe even source a 2nd hand tail piece.

    However, when I went to take the tyre off the bike for the first time since seeing this crack, the true extent of the damage was revealed. The whole rear plastic had been smashed completely off the subframe and was hanging about an inch lower now, held in place only by the mounting clips at the front; this was a big problem.

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    Yet again, luck was on my side. A local biker named Daniyar who had caught a taxi out to meet me told me about a place called Master Plastic which just happened to be 1km from where I was staying!

    Mainly seemed to be dealing in repair for car front and rear bars

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    So, I headed over there and despite a lack of English, we were able to determine exactly what needed to be done.

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    $8AUD and 45 minutes later, the tail was back on as good as new!

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    Now to get rid of this damn tyre. I put the tyre on around my waist and headed over to the Freerider workshop in the centre of town to get my front tyre changed after a good 10,000km life.

    With that sorted, it was now over to the Japan Bikes shop which was literally next door to my hotel to buy heated grips.

    I had been told by other places in town that it would be impossible to find them in summer but, luck prevailed again.

    Although I got the grips installed fairly easily on my own, it would have to wait for me to road test them as I got knocked out by some strange combination of a stomach bug and fever which had me in bed for nearly a day and a half. Maybe I’d need to rest up a little longer in Almaty…could think of much worse places to be stuck!

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    #97
    River Rat, Saso, 0theories and 8 others like this.
  18. Convoluto

    Convoluto Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2019
    Oddometer:
    26
    Location:
    Iberian Peninsula
    Love your story. Thanks for sharing. Keep us posted. Don't be shy with the number of photos.
    #98
  19. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    - ALMATY (PART TWO) –

    Seeing as I had been knocked out of commission for nearly two days, I decided to book another 3 nights in Almaty.

    The hotel was nice enough and I really wanted to do at least one day ride out somewhere. Plus it would allow me to try and avoid some forecasted rain

    Throughout this trip I keep thinking that I am mostly just riding from point to point and not doing much sightseeing. However by the time the ride has finished for the day it is usually evening and I am too tired

    If I do take days off, they’re mostly spent tidying up things on the bike, sorting out equipment, doing admin type things like updating my expense tracker or even these blogs which I am doing my best to maintain on Facebook, Instagram and 2 forums all with slightly different content to share as much as I can.

    And if not any of the above, simply resting in bed.

    My body has come a long way since Vladivostok where I was complaining about all sorts of pain.

    The back pain is only popping up now after extended periods of riding but goes away fast, now its just a general body soreness but nothing too bad.

    The worst is that every morning I wake up with my fingers aching a lot and recently they’ve even started locking up at a certain point before extending further too; not sure what that’s about.

    Other than that, long days of off road cause my wrists to swell a little which I’m sure I’ll have to endure for the duration of the Pamir which will be coming soon.

    Anyway, back to the riding!

    With new heated grips on, I decided to take a trip up to Big Almaty Lake, perched high up in the mountains to the south of Almaty and what a view it was! The heated grips were also amazing, so happy to have them on. My hands hurt like hell in Mongolia at only 2500m, so the Pamirs at nearly 5000m are surely going to test me.

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    In the evening, I had made contact with the Almaty Bikers group on Instagram, so just like Astana, they came in a group to take me out!

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    One of my favourite photos; WHY A GIXXER?

    I’m often asked this question and the simplest response I have is, because its my bike.

    I’ve owned this bike for over 10 years now where it has gone from being a weekend toy to a track bike and finally a travel bike.

    I have travelled other parts of the world on other GSXR600s but this one is mine.

    I have a fascination with seeing numberplates in places where they don’t belong.

    So seeing this photo from a night out with Almaty Bikers makes me so happy to see my standard Sydney numberplate alongside Kazakh plates in Almaty.

    Of course it’s an added bonus that the photo is taken from another Gixxer nearly the same as mine

    Once I am home, I look forward to taking a few minutes every now and then to just look at this bike and know in my mind all the places it has been.

    My bike.

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    We first went up to Medeu, up another hill near the city, which has a large ice skating rink. This is where the locals come to cool off when it gets just too hot in the city

    Kiril in the middle and Stas to the right, from Almaty Bikers

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    After that, we were taken to a nice restaurant in the city where the main admin of the Instagram page with whom I had made contact, Stas, paid for everyones dinner as it was his 31st birthday!

    Interesting point about Stas, as we were exchanging Facebook details, I realised that we were already friends on Facebook….but how?

    A few months ago, I had been in touch with a biker from Holland, Peter Muurman, who had done Central Asia and also Africa on his Ducati 996. He had told me to get in touch with a guy named Stanislav in Almaty as a good contact; turns out Stanislav and Stas were one and the same, I just didn’t realise it till a couple of hours after we’d met!

    With Kiril and Stas

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    I still have to get around to starting to work on videos I've been taking from my GoPro, drone and phone but in the meantime it seems that sportsbikes are so popular in Almaty that people love taking videos of them just cruising through. Came across this on some girls Instagram that were out and saw us riding



    From there, it was onto the Almaty late night hangout where bikes, modified cars and police all congregate; just like the Astana hangout!

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    Both these places brought back memories of home for me; having owned several heavily modified cars, I had spent many a late night at places like this.

    Wonderful people, everything I needed to fix the bike and a beautiful city; I was going to miss Almaty…

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    #99
    ScotsFire, UMG, Saso and 6 others like this.
  20. khpossum

    khpossum poster

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2007
    Oddometer:
    793
    Location:
    Colorado
    Locking fingers? Sounds like "trigger finger". Google it. Mine comes and goes.