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Russia, Mongolia, Stans & Beyond - On a GSXR

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by 7days1shower, May 21, 2019.

  1. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    The plan from Islamabad was to head towards Lahore and onwards to India. Unfortunately the night before I was due to leave we were sitting around watching car videos on Youtube which then became food videos showcasing all the amazing meat on offer in the city of Peshawar about 200km to the west near the Afghan border

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    So, Peshawar it is!

    As I rode along the highway to Peshawar, I felt the bike hesitate and went to pull aside. Could it be the fuel filter/pump again which had caused hesitation in Russia

    Then I also noticed that my hazards wouldn’t come on and upon coming to a stop the whole bike died and wouldn’t start back up. Ok, this seemed to be electrical

    My first thought was to pull it apart and start testing as I suspected a charging issue, specifically the stator as I had already upgraded the reg/rec on this bike after a failure in Aus. And the behaviour was very similar to a stator failure I had on my K3 GSXR in Europe.

    I was also hoping this would be the issue as I’d been lugging around a spare stator in my bags (along with some other spares which with my limited mechanical knowledge I had identified as more likely failure points)

    But what good was testing on the side of the road.

    I’d seen a Motorway Patrol car go past me just moments after I pulled over so decided to wait and see if another one came by so I could make a call to my friends in Islamabad for help (I don’t have a local SIM card)

    Broken down and waiting for a police car to pass by

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    After about half an hour with no police passing by, I started walking. First to a street cleaner who had no phone and then to a group of soldiers who were also broken down in their Hilux!

    Gave up waiting and started walking away and hoping the bike and luggage will still be here when I get back

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    Thankfully they let me make a phone call and within the next half hour a little Suzuki truck was on its way to pick me up and take me back to Islamabad to my friend Fahads house.

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    Unfortunately as I got set to test I found out my multimeter wires had split due to being rolled up and stored for so long in my luggage so I just decided to pull the stator out and have a look since I had a spare.

    It wasn’t super toasty but definitely looked a bit black so in goes the cheap Chinese eBay spare I had been carrying with me.

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    Bike was all back together and we jumped it from another battery however it still wouldn’t remain running.

    The confidence I’d been feeling about my diagnosis and the fact I had a spare stator started to fade away. If it was the regulator/rectifier (reg/rec) I was in big trouble.

    A girl a few weeks ahead of me who had ridden her CBR from Europe had been stuck in Pakistan for nearly a month waiting for a new stator and reg/rec to arrive; I couldn’t afford that sort of delay.

    Fahad suggested we take the bike to a small local shop who specialised sport bikes (or heavy bikes as they’re referred to locally)

    Of course the bike was dead so the only way to get it there was for Fahad to get on my bike while his brother rode another bike beside him and pushed with his foot through Pakistan traffic!

    Once there, we began testing again and my doubt that the cheap Chinese stator was faulty was alleviated, it was making electricity. So it had to be the reg/rec

    By some stroke of luck, the owner, Shakka, had an old 2008 CBR reg/rec lying around so after a bit of cut and shut we got it onto my bike and it ran!
    While the shop looked like any other small shop, Shakka knew what he was doing and even owned Hayabusas himself.

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    I also took the opportunity to get my horn mounted properly and sounding as loud as possible for the upcoming traffic. Till now, I had it held on with cable ties and sounded like a dying mouse.

    So, an issue that had left others stranded for nearly a month, I had overcome within the day; ready to take another crack at going to Peshwar for some amazing kebabs!

    1am dinner after a marathon day

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  2. LoRZo

    LoRZo Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2019
    Oddometer:
    34
    Location:
    France
    What an adventure :thumb
  3. viajero

    viajero Too old to be a nOOb

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    9,053
    Location:
    Idaho
    Update?
  4. yokesman

    yokesman Long timer

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2008
    Oddometer:
    2,360
    Location:
    SW. Idaho
    chinese parts for spares, that is being an adventurer.
    Lukeb likes this.
  5. 08StangGT_CS

    08StangGT_CS Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2018
    Oddometer:
    110
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX and Beyond
    He’s done a couple posts on Facebook so he’s still on the trip doing ok.
    Lost Cartographer likes this.
  6. Tsotsie

    Tsotsie Semi-reformed Tsotsi Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Oddometer:
    2,687
    Location:
    South Texas
    Still no updates here? Hope all is well?
    gpfan likes this.
  7. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Yep ... a big lesson learnt here.

    Apologies for the long break in updates but I am now India and for the past month have been without my bike due to another electrical failure. Bike has gone from one workshop where it sat for 2 weeks and after charging me through the roof, lasted all of 5km before dying again.

    Now in another workshop awaiting parts.

    I've broken down a mere 80km from the final destination of my ride and the clock has nearly run out on the time by when I need to ship it home

    The conclusion of my journey hangs in the balance and I've been too upset to do anything else, but I can at least get my posts back on track (slowly)
    gpfan and crowe2815 like this.
  8. 7days1shower

    7days1shower Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2011
    Oddometer:
    192
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Peshawar – Take 2

    After getting the bike fixed up from the previous days mishaps, the ride to Peshawar was quite smooth.

    Of course, I was taking the Grand Trunk Road (GT Road) since motorbikes can’t use the motorways.

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    The only hiccup this presented was that the GT Road in the middle of Peshawar city was at a complete standstill, my first initiation to city traffic and an intense one that that.

    Unfortunately I didn’t have a working SIM card yet (was ripped off and sold a dodgy one in Islamabad) so I had to figure my own way out of the blocked roads and make my way to my place for the evening.

    In Peshawar I was lucky enough to stay with some family friends and hosted by brothers Uzair and Umair who went out of their way to ensure I not only had a comfortable stay but was able to get out into the old town to eat as much of the local specialities as possible; mainly meat!

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    The old city roads filled with smoke from the preparation of Charsi Tikka

    Mutton cooked in a traditional way with a lot of fat!

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    Sitting in a traditional outdoor area

    My clothes ended up smelling like smoke but I much prefer this to the smell of cigarette smoke that permeated my clothes while in Islamabad

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    The town itself was also quite beautiful (in its own crowded and busy way) as Peshawar was quite an important city on the Old Silk road due to its strategic location only about 100km from Afghanistan.

    However Peshawar was only a stop on my journey in this side of Pakistan as I was venturing deeper into the Khyber region to the village of Malakand, again, staying with family friends

    My stay in Malakand was perhaps one of my most favourite places in Pakistan as it was the simple village life but there were also harsh reminders of the recent past.

    A traditional seating area for men usually only in the prominent houses of a village

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    Funny looking weeds growing all along the roadside

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    My host Haris told me about how just in the past decade the Pakistani Army had worked hard to flush out Taliban that were all throughout the surrounding mountains and it wouldn’t be an uncommon sight to see their bodies come floating down the river into town.

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    But this was the past, the present was us roaming through farms of fruit, rice and wheat while playing with guns and taking in all that nature had to offer.

    A century old, handmade shotgun

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    A much more appropriate vehicle for this terrain than a GSXR

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    Apricot farm

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    Can't be too safe when drinking chai

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    A dinner of delicious chappli kebabs and biryani

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    Pakistani traffic on the way back to Peshawar

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    More chapli kebabs!

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    A goodbye to Uzair and Umair as I set off from Peshawar to Islamabad

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    After 2 days of relaxing, it was time to get back on the road, and since I’d already spent 5 days in Islamabad, it was straight onto Lahore; the last city in my journey through Pakistan!

    A final meal of MORE kebabs in Islamabad

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    A chance to further damage my already suffering stomach with street food (or so I hoped)