S1000XR - How many GS's are suddenly going to be for sale?

Discussion in 'Road Warriors' started by Brahma, Nov 4, 2014.

  1. bmac

    bmac Long timer

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    The stock bar ends are aluminum and too light for the job at hand. Rhino Motorcycle has some heavier ones in production and will be available soon.

    The handling is as good as it gets. Get it out and flog it properly.
  2. appliance57

    appliance57 Long timer

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    wait'll you get 16 miles on it!!!!
    Ludocrator likes this.
  3. HalB

    HalB Adventurer

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    I'm considering the same choices. I'm selling a 2011 Multi and considering the 2015 Multi, 1000XR, and GS(A?)1200. I recently switched bikes with a buddy and rode 100km of twisties on his GSA (2015). The handling in the corners was phenomenal and confidence inspiring. We came back the same way and switched bikes and whoever was riding the Multi could not keep up on the corners with the GSA, it seemed more unstable after the beemer. If the skyhook suspension is as good as the ESA, it's a tough choice. Passing was a different story, the GSA was competent, but not thrilling. I only feel I would miss the awesome torque/kick on the multi if I switched teams. Otherwise I'd be happy to get away from the Ducati quirky world. (the bike was sitting in service for 6 weeks this summer waiting for trinkets from Italy). Yet to test ride the 2015 Multi or XR. (yes I know about KTM mudhwy). Please keep me posted with how your decision making goes.
  4. Iron Rey

    Iron Rey Wingnut Extraordinaire

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    Posted over from the other thread...

    All right, time for a little down load.

    I just returned from a 12 day, 6K+ mile jaunt from the midlands of Iowa, to California. The riding was a large amount of twisties or various degrees, from beautiful high speed sweepers on Colorado highways 149 and 141 to some pretty technical stuff on Ebbet's Pass on highway 4 in California with everything in between. I rode with my riding buddy who rode my K16GT.

    A few posts back I had outlined a few of the mods I did before departure, with the new heavier bar end weights, vibration was not an issue, the XM receiver gave me tunes, and Spot kept track of me.

    First, the shortcomings;

    Tank size, it needs to be a gallon bigger, having said that, even though I chose to carry an extra gallon and a half, I never had to use it, bike routinely got 43-45 MPG, and that wasn't riding conservatively either, that was seventy plus on warm days, however, it did drop as low as 32 when I was blasting back across Nebraska with a strong headwind. Having the extra fuel would have given me a more comfortable feeling out in the middle of nowhere (from Caliente to Tonopah riding the ET highway, fuck the aliens, look out for the cows!).

    Rear tie down area; I am going to design a plate and have a friend cut one out of aluminum on his water jet, I didn't want to run with the big BMW soft bag or the hard top case, used one of my trusty old Wunderlich pannier top bags, that alone was fine, however, after I added the extra gas and a couple of other things, it was difficult to find good tie down points, I have a design and if it works I will make it available.

    Pegs; I wanted to lower my driver pegs, I worked with Suburban Machinery, the first sent me the pegs for the GSAW, liked them immediately, then just before departure they sent me their kit that uses the old K12GT pegs, lots of nice cushy rubber... They failed (for me) miserably, the rubber just slipped around on the pegs to the upside down position, I did bring the GSAW pegs with me so back on they went, great pegs. Now YMMV on the K12 peg kit, I have big feet and like to stand up at times so I am not calling them junk or a lost cause, they just didn't do it for me, and if the stockers do you right, awesome.

    Seat; I bought the HP comfort seat and it might have been a little better than the stocker, I managed, but that is what I do, it was also my plan all along to stop into RDL to order my seat (I sent the stock pan ahead, I also had them make me one for my K16 as long as the bike was there).

    That's pretty much it for my downsides, now what was good;

    Tires; surprisingly the Battleaxes where good, nice blend of compounds that gave me great turning performance and I did get 6K out of them, I put another tire on in Casper, WY, an inexpensive one as the rest of the ride was just going to be super-slab. We had cold 43 degree weather with rain, very heavy at times starting in Butte, MT for about 250 miles, bike performed very well, even with a rear tire that was very worn. Also, the rain made us skip the last side trip we wanted to do, across the northern portion of Yellowstone and then over Bear Tooth pass to Red Lodge, it was snowing at 7500 feet.

    Controls; All worked well, the cruise control is great, however if you were going into a turn and laid into it a bit, the lean angle sensor didn't like it and the bike would hesitate ever so slightly, but never when you are on the throttle.

    Suspension and throttle setting, for the most part I left it in the two up setting (I am fat) with the response set on dynamic or road if I was in the rain, but when we made a run from Redding to Arcata and back on the 36/299 loop I had stripped everything off and went the full Monty with the settings at single rider and Dynamic Pro... Holy Hell, I cannot remember a more fun ride! This bike has what it takes, if you are a good rider it will make you FEEL like you are a better rider and if you are already a damn good rider (ahem) it will give you freedom to really throw your self at the road, yee-haw!

    Really, there is no reason not to use this bike as a super-tourer, it does everything that you hope in a very well sorted bit of kit, for the record, I am soon to be 52, 6'2" and overweight, yes, I ride a lot and have no unreasonable expectations, I am not concerned with having a big windshield (I ran it in the down position all the time and yes, I had bugs, but no buffeting, in fact the best advice I give people is to forget a big windshield and minimize, you will remember how good it feels to be in the airstream with NO buffeting, just like it was on the first bikes we rode.

    One last thing, for now, I am really over driving across the plain states, I have at least a couple dozen times, the next time I head west I am hauling my bikes to west of I25, 1600 miles (round trip) of flat and strait only wears your tires and adds nothing to the ride, I have taken every road from US2 to I40, there is only so much I am willing to do at this point in my life, and avoiding 100+ degree heat and the strong prairie winds just makes sense to me, I am not a poser, just tired of the endless landscape.

    If anyone has any questions, just let me know. Happy trails.
    TannerLdJ123 likes this.
  5. Iron Rey

    Iron Rey Wingnut Extraordinaire

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    Posted over...

    Finally had time to do a couple of things on my XR as my move is finally getting somewhere...

    I am leaving on a 2 week, 6-7K mile excursion to northern Cali via all the best roads in between this weekend, wanted to do a few things first.

    Bar end weights; I had some 1.5" stainless round stock so I had a guy machine me a couple, went about half and inch longer than stock, and yes, there is plenty of bolt threads to hold them on.

    Weight differences in grams.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Installed; I also did the "O" ring thing, loved them on my GSA's
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Next I played with the pegs; OEM[​IMG]

    Suburban Machine GSAW pegs;
    [​IMG]

    Suburban Machinery's adaption of the old K12 peg;

    [​IMG]

    Next I added a crossbar for mounting my SPOT locator and whatever else;

    [​IMG]

    The bar can probably also be mounted so it is back toward the rider as well.

    So, million dollar question, did any of this shit help? The bar end weights are the bomb, they virtually eliminated the buzziness, much nicer. As far as the pegs go, I just installed the K12 style and have only ridden it a couple of blocks, they seem nicer, but I really don't think the rubber will have much durability as I like to stand on the pegs now and again, and the spring is wonky, I would have just used my OEM pin without a spring, but the hole is slightly smaller, that is feedback I am going to give them. I really like the GSAW peg, wide, long, and grippy, I have friggin skis for feet so I appreciate them, also, you can use the OEM pin (sans spring, really not needed anyway) so the install is very clean, I am bringing those with me and will change them out along the ride so I can give feedback here and to Suburban Machine.

    The "O" ring kit and the crossbar came from an old friend and riding buddy Tom Dowell, I am sure some of you have gotten stuff from his company, Excel Cycle Werkes, and Excel Throttle Control (they are the cats azz), great guy, have no financial connection and pay full price just like the rest of you bastards will.

    I will report after the trip on how it went and if I can make this gnarly beast into the super-sport tourer I want... Will also be stopping by RDL for custom seat ordering!
  6. guns_equal_freedom

    guns_equal_freedom Long timer

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    Why do you say that?
  7. guns_equal_freedom

    guns_equal_freedom Long timer

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    Why do you say that?
  8. Z3n

    Z3n Been here awhile

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    Anyone know if someone is doing aftermarket suspension for this bike yet? I like mine, but the road damping setting simply doesn't have enough rebound, and dynamic damping can be a touch harsh over nasty roads. I run the bike basically 80% of the time in rider + luggage preload with dynamic damping, occasionally tossing it into road for known bad sections of freeway. I'm ~180 pounds + gear, with a topbox with 20 pounds or so of stuff in it.

    Riding it aggressively up a twisty road while forgetting to set it to dynamic ended with the shock fading so bad I thought the rear tire had picked up a nail. Admittedly, I was riding much faster than "road" speed should probably justify, but I was surprised it lost rebound damping that quickly. It'd be nice to have the bike have a couple of legitimately useful modes, rather than "excellent performing but harsh" and "more compliant but bouncy".
  9. Z3n

    Z3n Been here awhile

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    I wrote a thing on the S1000XR, I hope folks enjoy it:
    The Rise of ADV Sport: A S1000XR Review

    If you've been following my bike history (why wouldn't you?), you'd know I bought in to our electronic future about a year and a half ago, with a 1290 SuperDuke. As of 2014, there was nothing that could compete with that bike in the arena of top shelf suspension, brakes, electronics, horsepower and an upright seating position. But while the SuperDuke is exceptional at a short haul through tight traffic, or ripping up a twisty road, it's not in its strongest suit when you start riding the undulating slab of the 580. As I'm nothing if not a purist for the type I like, the SuperDuke still fits my ideal motorcycle nearly perfectly. But it was time for a change: rather than being focused on street hooliganism and track performance, it was time to revamp for for dominating a commute, interchanges, merges, and carrying me to work with speed and efficiency. The range to do at least 160 miles before hitting reserve was a requirement as well, which the Superduke does neatly by virtue of getting 45+mpg on a casual commute. But getting a SuperDuke to push towards 50mpg is the ultimate pyhrric victory, like beating diabetes by replacing your blood with HFCS, and gives no satisfaction.

    [​IMG]
    This surprise ruined by the title.

    Although the world doesn't need another case study on the Faustian bargains you can make with highly paid marketing consultants to build a Brand Experience, I'm still going to drag you through the sordid details. After all, you can't talk about an S1000XR without talking about the rise of the ADV scene. The ADV scene contains wonderful mainstays of Long Way Around R1200GS cosplay, and riders who lovingly order stickers from around the world to affix to their dentist's thrones, while talking about how one day they're just gonna take off and ride, man. But the best marketing always contains a drop of truth, and that truth homeopathicically distributed through this bucket of marketing indiscretions is that in dirt riding you find clean, solid design principles. Horsepower is available in spades because you're only riding dirt to roost your buddies, refined long travel travel suspension to handle your poor life and line choices, an upright seating position that helps you target fixate off the shortest cliff, and light weight so that you spend less time begging your buddies to help you drag your bike back to the trail. And indeed, all of these things hold similar virtues on the street. Horsepower brings danger closer, faster. Light weight increases confidence and maneuverability, while refined suspension carries you through corners you never should have made, and an upright seating position lets you rise above the human concerns of traffic and dream of freedom. There's also the continuing drive towards electronic aids on the street, which overpriced ADV bikes wallow in as essential bullets in their marketing fluff, and is another entire debate I'll sidestep entirely by pointing out that those that disparage modern rider aids are moronic neo-luddites and those that welcome and spend money on them are the golden heralds of the new age. After all, there's something to be said for an electronic package that allows a terrible rider to maximize the speed at which they fling themselves off the shortest cliff their ADV inspired bike allows them to find, regardless of its impact on the secondary market.

    And this is the point where someone chimes in and says something about how the sport touring community has been doing this for years and the VFR750 was the pinnacle of the gentleman's sport touring ride and - well, they'd continue, but they need to take a break to check that they took today's medication, and by the time they get back from doing that, had a quick detour to the bathroom, they've forgotten what they were saying, the name of the person they were talking to, and are primarily preoccupied with if their suspenders are going to hold their pants up for the remainder of the trip home. And indeed, that's actually a pretty good reason to ignore the sport touring market entirely. The bikes are over weight, under suspended, slow to react, and most of the motorcycle manufacturers have realized that the entire marketplace is rapidly expiring, and have discontinued the bikes with no plans to continue onward. As the stock and trade of a modern Renaissance motorcyclist is subtlety and wit, I have left only the barest implications that there might be a relationship between sport touring bikes and their riders - consider this a puzzle for the reader to explore. And while there is a value in the knowledge that occasionally bubbles to the surface in the sport touring scene, this is often akin to the dilemma that those of us who are friends with KLR riders face. While Kawasaki may have built a perfectly functional motorcycle out of pot metal, polyurethane, and the design principles of the Roman empire, these are probably not the staidly functional choices we should build a lifestyle around. After all, this sort of reasonable, responsible thought isn't going to Make America Great Again, and we can't allow the usefulness of a cheap sport tourer or a KLR to detract from the dream of propping up a failing American ideology via a last ditch set of poor decisions on financing, balloon payments, and wealth transfers to those that replaced their sense of decency, worth, and social responsibility with a bank account balance.

    Ahem, where was I? Oh, yes, the S1000XR. Let's have a picture:
    [​IMG]
    A BMW in it's natural habitat: The garage.

    Well, I mean, you can read a thousand reviews that say things about the motorcycle. It goes fast! It has suspension bits that bounce both up and down at both ends! More buttons than a hipster's wardrobe! But I think that a refined reader of my words deserves better than that. So in the time honored tradition of terrible management across the board, I'm gonna shit sandwich this bike and we're gonna see what it's like to actually live with.

    The bike itself is a wonderfully aural experience - firing it up, it emits a raspy, lumpy idle, and if you put it in most powerful modes, it emits a burble coming off the throttle that reminds you of an F1 car blowing a gout of fire from its tailpipe. Slam up the gears without touching the clutch, and be rewarded by the flat static burst of the quickshifter, slam it down the gears without the clutch and appreciate rev-matched downshifts and the burble and pop of race bred DNA. At low RPM, the engine pulls smoothly and without drama, gathering itself to spring, and at 5k it begins to wail with a distinctly un-gentlemanly howl before fucking straight off into the territory of an ex-AMA racebike. If any government agencies besides the NSA are reading this, I'm happy to be the brave anonymous tipster on the clear violation of sound emissions in exchange for buyback rights to all motorcycles found in violation. Just send me an email, I'm sure you already have my information. And much like the effortless shifts of government direction in the interests of its controllers, the engine jumps to respond to any input change with the frictionless synchronization of a backroom deal. It's quite clear that there has been minimal change during the theft of the dark heart of the S1000RR to jam it into this new chassis. The dual direction quickshifter is also equally interesting, it works in a wide variety of configurations from seamless changes that are too good to be believed to the occasional misstep as you fail to shift strongly and positively enough and instead simply bounce your foot off the shift lever ineffectively. But it works well enough, often enough, that it will handle the majority of your downshifts, with only occasional reaches for the clutch when it's actually needed.

    And despite the size and wheelbase of the motorcycle, it steers into a corner with wild abandon, tempered only slightly by a clinical team of engineers debating the exact speed at which the human brain can handle a change in direction with some form of accuracy. With the amount of leverage courtesy of the wide bar, I found it somewhat over-sensitive. I fixed this by applying a bandsaw to the last few inches of the bars, reducing leverage to a more useful ratio, while also slimming the bike for lane splitting. In the ergonomic space, as I am a man who also once dabbled in the black tar heroin that is supermoto riding, I also appreciate that a high seat is offered, expanding the seating position out to more dirt bike inspired dimensions. There's a low seat, too, for the inseam challenged. The suspension is useful, but clearly a compromise point for BMW, as they are trying to reconcile the yin and yang of sport riding against the history they have build on cushioning the backsides of rich urban bikers to and from the local artisan coffee joint. As such, while road mode is nicely damped and supple, it lacks the appropriate rebound damping, meaning each bump is a novel exploration of the rebound waveform collapsing. Dynamic mode, on the other hand, fails to handle potholes with grace, but is beautiful up a twisty road, with excellent sport riding settings. The single rider mode lacks enough preload in the back, but cheating it with the rider and luggage mode fixes the problem. Ironically, the right settings are all available, they're just mushed up in the wrong places. Rider plus luggage road mode on the front with rider only dynamic mode on the rear shock would probably be a great commuting setting, and rider plus luggage front and rear in dynamic mode with the compression settings from road mode would be a nearly perfect sane street pace ride. As it is, rider plus luggage in dynamic mode comes into it's own up a relatively smooth twisty road, and the 2 up preload setting makes you think your pillion has disappeared entirely.

    So all of those things are standouts about the bike - but there are a number of things that are marginal as well. The dark side of the frictionless, quick reving engine is essentially zero rotating mass, which means pulling away from a stop requires a significant fistful of revs, or the RPMs drop alarmingly as you let the clutch out. Expect to burn the clutch a bit. Also, the gear ratios are nearly unchanged if changed at all from the S1000RR, so you've got a frankly moronic 6 speed that's so tight ratio, the difference between the gears is marginal. It would be great to have a first gear that topped out at lower speed, and an overdrive 6th that dropped you into the nice spread of torque available at 4k. Of course, this is how BMW has been winning all the top gear roll-on competitions, so fair play to them for trouncing the competition there, just a pity it comes at the cost of real world usability. Essentially, I find myself operating the motorcycle like a 4 speed: First, 2nd, 4th, and 6th. The difference between 5th and 6th is about 400RPM at 60mph, which makes the top gear feel pointless. It would have been wonderful if they had shortened first gear significantly, spread 2nd through 5th lightly, and then made 6th a very tall, true overdrive gear. And while we're talking about the clutch, you spend $19,250 on a bike, and BMW gifts you with a non-adjustable clutch lever. That, paired with the axial mount master cylinder, makes me wonder if they started developing the bike from the ground up, made it to the top, and just phoned it in for the levers, brake MC, and windshield, all of which are marginal at best. The windshield does a wonderful job of taking an otherwise smooth, reasonably quiet riding experience and throwing dirty air straight into your helmet, increasing buffeting and noise dramatically. If you stand up on the pegs and get into clean air the noise level drops approximately 60%, which is just staggering. As such, I'm removing the windscreen and the windscreen mounts, which I anticipate will completely fix the problem. As I'm 5'11 with the legs of someone who's 5'5 and the torso of someone who's 6'5, I think my physical construction here is as much to blame as the bike's, but hey, I bought the damn thing, you have to listen to my gripes about it. That's just how the deal works.

    There is also the little point of the bike actually having linked brakes, which is a feature most reviewers don't even bother to mention. I first noticed it when the rear brake lever felt very inconsistent - well, as it turns out, that's because it uses the ABS pump to engage the rear brake when you apply the front brake. I think this actually contributes a large degree to the stability of the bike on the brakes in the corners and while upright, as a computer based engagement means when you apply the front brake, the bike can actually apply the rear brake very effectively based on speed, lean angle, front brake application, etc, to establish and exploit available rear traction to help control dive and smooth brake application. The system is so transparent that you wouldn't notice it unless you're riding the rear brake as you apply the front brake, where you'll notice the rear lever becomes oddly firm. It's nothing like the linked brake systems of the past, and I believe it contributes in a huge way to confidence applying brakes in a corner, especially when paired with the cornering ABS. Interestingly, despite this excellent functionality, the power of the brakes is somewhat disappointing, as I feel like it takes a significant amount of force to get the bike to really engage the front brakes. The braking power is there, it just requires more force than I would like. I'll probably fit a Brembo master cylinder to address this particular issue - I'd imagine this is a place where they skimped a little, because it's acceptable to reduce front braking power when you're building an "ADV" bike.

    There's also the obvious other caveats, that this bike simply doesn't work in real offroad riding. You can absolutely fire-trail it, double track, it'll handle dirt roads just fine, but it's not going to handle true singletrack. But no one's buying it for that, either. It'll go to Alaska and back no problem, but you're an idiot or a glutton for punishment if you want to ride this thing anywhere serious offroad. I purchased the OEM engine crash bars for it, which amusingly, require taking a dremel to at least one fairing to fit. You can get away without dremeling the left fairing, but the right one it is a necessity - I'm assuming this is some sort of "you're going to drop it, you asshole" indoctrination.

    But it's time for the last slice of bread: This bike is legitimately amazing. The complaints that I raise are almost entirely nitpicks, and easily fixed by throwing a few hundred extra dollars at the bike. Some might balk at spending another thousand bucks or so to fix these sort of problems, but everyone's gonna have a different opinion on most of the things here, with the exception of the non-adjustable clutch lever, which is a very odd oversight in a premium bike like this. As it is, I'll probably just make something that fits and uses a Brembo lever to match the master cylinder I'll end up buying. The bike as a whole package is exactly what I wanted: A ballistically quick, well suspended, upright steed with top shelf electronics, that is equally at home lane splitting home at 8PM, tearing up a twisty mountain road solo or 2 up, or strapping a pile of luggage on to go out camping for the weekend. It nets 40mpg under casual use, pushing range to an easy 160 miles, the TC lets you slide enough to have a good time, and you can click it off the fly to perform wheelies for the kids or impressionable middle aged men. Throw a topbox on it, enjoy the invisible luxury of aping the responsibility of the sport touring crowd while riding a bike that will do 0-100 in the time it takes the officer to figure out you're not over the hill. It's the perfect bike to rack up thousands of guilt free, fast, safe miles on. It'll also probably make fools of arrogant sportbike riders when I take it to the track. It's a very worthy companion to the SuperDuke for those who, like me, are willing to support the American way of life on a financing plan. As they say, if you can pretend to have the means, I highly recommend it.

    [​IMG]

    PS: Someone's gonna say something about vibrations or some shit, and to that I have to say: There's your proof that BMW riders are all dentists, and also, they mostly seem to go away after you break the bike in. Between break in, fitting the engine bars, and shortening the handlebars, the vibration profile changed enough that I don't notice them. Also, cruise control means you can take your hands off the bars on demand.

    PPS: Also, thanks to SF BMW for being awesome and getting me a bike really quickly once I decided I wanted one. Buy all your bikes and stuff from them. I'm off to ride my bike around, ciao!
    bobw, MdoubleP, Oeths and 2 others like this.
  10. bmac

    bmac Long timer

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    How much did you take off of the bars? I find them a little wide and would like to trim them a bit as well.

    The flywheel is very light which contributes to its fast revving nature. I love it. I experience no trouble at starts and do not use a lot of revs to get going. I expect my clutch to last a very long time as it is not seeing any abuse on my part.

    I think the gearing is just about perfect. No need to change. With clutchless shifts there is no need to skip a gear. In the twisties a nice mix of 3rd and 4th gears gets the job done quite well.

    Cable operated clutch is not what is expected on a premium motorcycle. A miss in my book.

    Windscreen and fairing is not as good as it could/should be on a this type of bike. Hopefully the aftermarket will address.

    I think the linked brakes work great. I have a similar experience on my K1600GT and think BMW did a great job. Others that have rode my bike made a point of commenting on how well the brakes worked. Yours might not be quite right.

    Agreed, this bike is legitimately amazing.
    Dagny_Taggart likes this.
  11. ARiderX

    ARiderX Long timer

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    That's a truly enjoyable read! Really great writing! A post I could have totally missed out on by the way, as it's in a topic i only occasionally click on because I don't own the bike. (just to read up on it)

    Wish this site had a dedicated section for blog-type posts like this one.
  12. Z3n

    Z3n Been here awhile

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    Glad you enjoyed it!

    I pulled about 1.6 inches off the bars. Maybe could have gone with a bit less, but it's fine as is. The thing that irks me the most is BMW used a 32mm fatbar on the bike, not the more standard 28mm one that most manufacturers use - I have a couple of fatbars floating around that I would have tried otherwise.

    I think that my main problem is I have short fingers so I'm at the very edge of my hand when I'm pulling away from a start - this obviously contributes to the difficulty of controlling the slip of the clutch. With no adjustment, I can't move the lever in easy finger reach without engaging the switch that disables the cruise control/quickshifter.

    I'm super spoiled by the 1290 SuperDuke gearing, which is wide and takes great advantage of the broad spread of power the bike makes - I was hoping for something similar on the BMW, but didn't get it. Until you've ridden a bike with a proper wide ratio street gearbox, everything else seems totally fine. Once you've gotten on one that's geared right (first gear to ~50mph, 2nd to 75, 3rd to 90, 4th to 110 or so, 5th to 130, and 6th to 160ish), tight ratio gearboxes stop making sense. The wider ratios would require (somewhat) more careful gear selection, but the spread of power is so broad on the BMW I think it would make the bike a little more engaging to ride (shifting gears at low RPM would do significantly more), and improve fuel economy. I don't think the 1290 engine is any more efficient, I think it just runs ~2k RPM lower at freeway speed, and that nets me upwards of 10mpg more.

    I took a spin after pulling the windscreen off entirely, and the bike is greatly improved. Now I just need to figure out how to remove the windscreen support while still making it look OEM.

    I really like the linked brakes as well, I just think the amount of force you have to put into the front lever to get it to the limit of braking - too much grip force makes it difficult to modulate. I can stoppie the bike, but it's not like pulling stoppies on the SuperDuke, which is significantly more controllable up to the limit. I'm splitting hairs, here, but again, premium motorcycle. A lot of time spent on the track makes me favor one finger brakes that require a minimum of force to modulate, which isn't to everyone's taste :)
  13. hart

    hart Been here awhile Supporter

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    3200 miles on my 2016 S1000XR I am starting to really like this machine.. Riding position is quite fine..Power and handling awesome. Still love my 2012 GSA, which is sitting in storage in Seattle at the present time waiting for a run down the coast to LA.. It will feel like an old friend when I finally get on it. Im lucky I can have two wonderful machines and totally enjoy them both...
  14. hankgs

    hankgs Long timer

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    COSTCO in Goleta, CA had a BMW, yes folks, NOT a Yamaha- NOT a Honda, a freekin' 1000XR on a motorcycle stand by the exit as part of their vehicle purchase program....!
  15. MUDHWY

    MUDHWY Life is not a race

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    God bless Costco! Can I put the purchase on my Amex rewards card? :-)
  16. SVTNate

    SVTNate Been here awhile

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    Z3n,

    I read, I smirked, I salute you.

    Thanks for the read.
    Z3n likes this.
  17. GreyThumper

    GreyThumper Long timer

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,090
    Location:
    Manila, Philippines
    I don't think the XR is going to cannibalize GS sales significantly. I've got a GS; shaft drive, Telelever, 19-inch wheels, and a boxer engine are just a few of many reasons I'd rather have a GS than an XR.

    I'm sure the XR is an awesome bike, but I think it's quite obviously meant to bring riders who would otherwise get a Ducati Multi into the BMW fold. And to be honest, if I was interested in a "tall-rounder", I'd still prefer the Duc over the XR, mainly for the Ducati V-Twin.
  18. scfrank

    scfrank Old farts riding club. Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    23,785
    Location:
    Upstate SC
    Great read. Thanks. Anyone interested in a lightly used R1200R?
    Z3n likes this.
  19. SVTNate

    SVTNate Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2015
    Oddometer:
    379
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    I test rode both. Now that's an interesting trade, from an ergonomics standpoint.

    The R1200R is comfortable for people whose inseams are measured in nanometers, or are denied entry into half the rides at Disneyland.

    The XR is for people who are taller than the average NBA player. They measure inseams in yards (or meters). Or Parsecs.

    I am almost precisely 5 foot 10 and one half inches, without shoes. I found the R1200R legroom slightly cramped, with my RS being just about perfect. The XR is way too tall for me. I'm mostly torso, with a short inseam.

    It's also important to note that while appropriately priced as a BMW, the XR (and its included naked/race replica brethren) requires the owner to suffer the indignity and humiliation of chain maintenance. A proper BMW would not subject its owner to such working-class trivialities. Next, you'll tell me that the XR requires the production of a key from one's pocket, and insertion/turning of said key for operation of the motorcycle or the gas cap. How banal.
    MdoubleP likes this.
  20. scfrank

    scfrank Old farts riding club. Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    23,785
    Location:
    Upstate SC



    Well, tongue in check ignored, there is some truth to what you say. I am 6 ft. tall and on my toes on the XR. If I comment on it people look at me like I don't know how to ride, or maybe that's my insecurity showing. Perhaps the XR low? Why do I need ground clearance on a street bike?

    You're right, the R is cramped. Even with the sport seat.
    As for the keyless ride? I like it, no key fumbling at the gas pump. I know its a little thing, but it happens every 200 miles or so. Whats wrong with convienence? It I didn't appreciate that I would buy a Royal Enfield.


    Chain? I could care less. I've had several modern chain bikes, maintenance is minimal.