School me on the Multistrada

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Puglia10, Aug 19, 2016.

  1. Puglia10

    Puglia10 Been here awhile

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    In the search for a do-it-all bike. Ducati MTS and KTM 1190adv come to mind.
    400 mile days back to back. Track days, dirt roads, slab for hours at a time, you name it.
    Am I thinking the Multi is a good weapon for this?

    It'll be used. $10k USD range. Looks like I can get a 2010-ish model for that price.

    What years are better or worse than others?
    Common problems? I'm reading expanding fuel tank?
    Any to stay away from?
    How is the maintenance? I do about 8,000 miles a year and it won't have a warranty.

    Any help trying to find the elusive do-it-all bike before I have to buy two cheaper ones is appreciated, thanks!
    #1
  2. jas123

    jas123 Been here awhile

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    I just bought one 2 weeks ago (2010 touring S ,8400 miles) . Awesome bike. I have a 990 superduke and a 990 adv r also. The Ducati kind of fits between these 2. Doesn't quite handle as good as the superduke,,,, but damn close. Not as dirt worthy as the ADV 990, but then again not much is, in a big bike. It will go run a fire road pretty good, the rougher the road, take your time. It tours very well, I did a 3600 trip, and a 1000 mile day on it. Ride's very comfortable for me.
    Think of it as sport touring superbike, with a wide capability range. I do own a couple of strictly dirt bikes and could probably sell one of my KTM's and not feel like I'm giving to much up. I'm happy with it so far
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  3. Paul124ac

    Paul124ac Long timer

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    How tall are you? I found the Ducati, beautiful as it is, to be an uncomfortable place to be. The KTM is ugly but would be the perfect do-it-all bike, doesn't have cruise, only real issues are soft rims on earlier examples. I ended up buying a Caponord Rally only because of the unbeleivable deal I got, let's just say with the difference I can buy a 690.
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  4. TBR

    TBR One Life ~ Live It...

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    Ducati MTS 1200S-PP (2012) ~ my face hurts from smiling so much, no longer need to stop for coffee as I will arrive sufficiently stimulated....
    Having used mine in anger for almost five years now, on road, light off-road and race track, I can honestly say that it is the best bike I have ever ridden / owned bar nothing. Even the latest bikes I had the privilege to test ride till today don't come close in my personal opinion. The sheer feedback from the bike is unbelievable, you can feel every stretch of tarmac (good and bad) with great suspension (properly set up withy the Öhlins suspension ECU upgrade) , the chassis is astonishing, the engine is extremely flexible and it is a complete missile during track days... 'nuff said.....
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  5. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    - Make sure your model is an "S" - it'll have the gold Ohlins. The 2010-2012 base models have gray Marzocchi forks, the S models and Pikes Peak all have Ohlins. The 2013-2014 S models and Pikes Peak all have gray Skyhook forks, the base models have whitish-gold Marzocchis. The base models are good (same motor, same modes, same dash) but the Ohlins is sweet, and adding the SCU module makes it perform dynamically, like Skyhook.
    - The 15k services get expensive (about $1200-$1500).
    - The rear brake is weak / nonexistent, it's a known issue on all bikes (even the 2016s) and isn't a huge deal.
    - The fuel tank expansion issue isn't a huge issue, unless the bike's been sitting for a long time with ethanol gas. I unfortunately have to run ethanol gas (thanks, CA) but I don't let the bike sit for long periods of time.
    - Other chronic issues include fuel level sensor and DES system errors.
    - Parts in general can be expensive.
    - See if you can find an extended warranty for it.
    - I would recommend Pilot Road 4s for sport touring with lots of slabbing, Pirelli Angel GTs for sport-touring without a lot of slabbing.
    - The wind protection kinda sucks if you're over 5'9", lots of helmet buffeting. I run a Multi GT screen w/ an MRA X-Creen clamp on and it works decently. Puig, MRA, or Givi tall windscreens work well also and are cheaper.
    - Make friends with your local dealer's service dept - a good dealer service dept can be the game changer in Ducati ownership experience, if you get problems. If you have a good dealer already, ask about that extended warranty and which one they'll work with best.
    - Make sure the bike you buy has all service records and documentation - I wouldn't trust an owner that didn't keep good records for a $20k bike that probably has seen some dealer shop time.
    - IMHO, don't waste money on an expensive Termi system or even slip-on. It makes it louder, but this Testastretta head design will not ever sound as good or as beautiful as the sportbikes - I have a friend with a 1098 streetfighter with full termis, my Multistrada does not and will never sound as good as his does. (the heads are different) :(
    #5
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  6. TBR

    TBR One Life ~ Live It...

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    Good feedback, post #5 by brianpc.... just adding my personal input, the full Termi MTS system eliminates the toaster box underneath the engine (CAT = heavy + ugly and heats up the rear brake system). Installed a upgraded rear Brembo Caliper http://motowheels.com/i-7788000-brembo-hard-anodized-84mm-mount-cnc-2-piece-rear-caliper.html and using Motul RBF600 Brake Fluid, added a insulated rear master cylinder heat shield (shield was available some years ago via USA ducati.ms forum) = http://ducatiforum.co.uk/threads/group-buy-rear-brake-master-cylinder-heat-shields.19197/

    Have no rear brake problems for years with my MTS-PP 2012 ~ actually never had rear brake problems but the upgraded rear Brembo Caliper increased braking power...

    http://mts1200.info has some good solid MTS info (pre DVT), apparently a good MTS rear brake fix to bleed the entire ABS brake system: http://mts1200.info/threads/abs-brakes-bleed-mod.187/ have all the parts as we installed a set on my mates MTS, never done the Speedbleeder installation on my MTS-PP (2012) as of today, my rear brake just works, well ~ now I am jinxed...
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  7. Puglia10

    Puglia10 Been here awhile

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    thanks for the info!
    BTW, I'm only 5'8"
    I've gotten pretty good at scooting my butt over and putting one foot down at a time, since every bike is too tall for me lol
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  8. atwoodtja

    atwoodtja Been here awhile

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    To be honest, I wouldn't buy either the KTM or Ducati if I were planning to go 8k miles a year on it. You're likely to spend a lot of time or money on maintenance repairs. You may get lucky, but its a gamble.
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  9. Florida Lime

    Florida Lime Long timer Supporter

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    Eight thousand miles a year is a lot ? :photog
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  10. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    It is for a Ducati, when you consider resale value. Ask me about the depreciation on my 2014 Multistrada Pikes Peak with 23k miles.. Compared to a 2014 BMW R1200GSA with twice that many miles. :) And BMW has just as many costly problems as the modern Ducatis do, IMHO based on what I've read here on Advrider.
    Based on ownership of experience of 2 Ducatis now, I'd be wary of 2+ year-old bikes with low miles.. they either haven't been ridden enough to discover any chronic problematic issues, or they've been parked at the dealer getting those issues fixed? :)

    Either way, make SURE any Ducati you used has the service records.. Even if you buy it from a dealer secondhand. If they don't have records, they better atone for that by throwing in an aftermarket warranty with purchase. :)
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  11. Florida Lime

    Florida Lime Long timer Supporter

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    I don't buy bikes for resale value - I buy bikes to ride. :D

    Don't ask what my 2010 GSA was worth with 93,000 miles. :bluduh
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  12. atwoodtja

    atwoodtja Been here awhile

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    Me, too. I usually keep my bikes for over 50k miles before trading or selling them. By then, I'm not that concerned with the resale value, I'm usually more concerned with long term reliability and how much time I have to spend working on it versus riding it. I also don't want to be "that guy", the one whose bike breaks down on the group ride.

    However, brianpc makes a good point: no one wants a used Ducati (or KTM) with 50k miles on it. Hell, not many want one with 30k miles on it, especially considering how many low mileage garage queen examples are always for sale instead. And if you do your own maintenance rather than being periodically wallet-raped by the dealers, you might as well forget about selling it.

    There is at least a reasonably sized group of riders out there who will consider buying a used, high mileage BMW. That's because BMWs (and others like Honda, Yamaha, etc) have proven over the years that they will usually run past the 100k mile range with regular maintenance. There just aren't enough examples of high-mileage Ducatis or KTMs to prove their reliability over the long term. They are very fun bikes, just not really designed and tested for more than 5k miles a year IMHO. YMMV, obviously.
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  13. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    Yeah yeah, there's always one of you guys. I buy bikes that pique my interest and are fun to ride, and that changes, so resale value is a factor because I sell them and pick up a new one. And if you're a BMW owner then you've made my point for me - go try selling a 6 year old Ducati with 93000 miles. The 2010 Multistradas are great bikes - especially the S models with the Ohlins. You could find a mechanically perfect, clean, never-down example and the resale value is shit. 6 year old clapped-out GSAs with 93k miles and some farkle still command a premium, go check the For Sale forums here. :)

    I have a 2 year old Pikes Peak Multistrada for sale, that is mechanically perfect and clean and never down. It has 23k miles and you'd think the thing has leprosy. :) BMWs are just as problematic and expensive as Ducatis when it comes to major maintenances, but BMW has the reputation so it comes out ahead. :)

    Anyway. Semantics aside, my advice is that the maintenance costs and resale value should definitely be things to consider and research when thinking about purchasing a Ducati. It's great that these don't enter your mind if you buy a BMW - the resale on the GS bikes is phenomenal - but they have their own problems to consider. :)
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  14. Puglia10

    Puglia10 Been here awhile

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    Thank you for the replies!
    I test rode one and I must say, incredible bike! I really liked it.
    Resale value is absolute shit, which I guess isn't too bad for me being in the market for a used one! lol
    A couple 2012's for $9,000-10,000....less than 5,000 miles...jeesh!

    The maintenance is a little scary (intervals, cost, inability to do it myself if its really complicated and paying a dealer)
    Is there somewhere I can find when the intervals are? And how much they cost? Someone said at 15,000 miles theres a $2,000 check up.....
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  15. Florida Lime

    Florida Lime Long timer Supporter

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    I know at my Ducati dealer there is a big wall chart showing the maintenance item intervals and the hourly time quote for each one. There is probably something online similar, but I don't have time right now to look.

    I know that the newer MTS have an 18,000 mile valve check, and I think the older ones have it at 15,000 miles. I know the time quote for checking the valves is much less than that, but if someone routinely takes their bike to a dealer for all the maintenance, they might need chain and sprockets at the same time, or tires, or oil and filter change, etc. A service doing all of those things will add up !
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  16. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    It's in my post.

    2010-2014 multis (all models) are 7500/15000mi for service intervals. 2015-new (DVT multis) are 9000/18000mi. Not sure how much the DVT maintenance costs are, but I've heard $1800 or so from multistrada.ds reports. If you can google for an online owner's manual you can find what's involved at each interval, some things can be done yourself to save $$.
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  17. Puglia10

    Puglia10 Been here awhile

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    whoops sorry. reading so many threads i get lost lol.
    that doesnt sound very appealing! im used to my harley...30,000 miles and all Ive done is change the oil! Guess you gotta pay to play huh?
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  18. Big Tall Bastard

    Big Tall Bastard Voice of Reason

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    I've got an 03 Multistrada with 20,000 miles on it. Its had the regular belt service which is important. Its like anything else fun costs a little more money depending on your idea of fun. If your scared of maintenance on the 2nd gen bikes look for a clean example of the 1st gen. I'm 6'6" and there is actually more room on the earlier bikes for me. It 90 hp and air cooled but a shitload of torque, amazing in the corners and lighter overall.

    I don't pick bikes based on resale value which has cost me money over the years but I could care less. I mean who buys a Cagiva Gran Canyon off the show room floor if your worrying about resale?! The early bikes are really fully depreciated so a clean bike with 20,000 miles isn't really worth much less than a clean bike with 35,000 miles. You can get a clean bike with a service record for $3500-$5000.
    I'd rather push my broken Ducati than ride some soulless, utility motorcycle that isn't really much more reliable.
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  19. flyinturbo

    flyinturbo Been here awhile

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    LOL.. Really? 6k on my enduro in 3 months. Zero in repairs. Oil change only (and chain lube if you wanna count that)

    My '12 MTS has been super reliable in 20K miles. I have had a number of service visits for various small items... no paperwork kept. If someone wants to see my service history, go to the dealership. They'll run through the service history. I don't care.. I buy bikes to ride.

    Exactly.

    Anyway, to the OP, the MTS is pretty amazing. I've knocked down multiple 1000 mile days, ridden through 10 deg weather for hours, ridden in 100 deg weather for hours, ridden through water that came up over the front wheel, carried two people and camping gear for multiple weeks and the bike has never disappointed. It wants to run, it likes to be unleashed and turned free to accelerate and turn. Yet, at the end of hundreds of miles, it still feels comfortable. I have never had a bike that feels so comfortable for so many days with the ability to ride in so many different conditions. As a side note, the new Enduro is even better in almost every aspect.

    My experience (and current garage): KTM 990 ADV, '12 MTS 1200 S, '16 MTS Enduro, 07 CRF 450X.

    Get the bike, ride it, enjoy it!
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  20. brianpc

    brianpc Long timer Supporter

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    Op - this, for sure!!!*







    *However, you should also consider resale value on any bike when purchasing, and look for a used example of a used Multi with full records, in case something happens in life to you that forces a sale. Having full records on an Italian bike if you're the 2nd owner will keep your resale value up.
    Personally, I think it's financially idiotic to not include the resale value of any motorcycle I'm purchasing into consideration, but hey, what do I know. Some people don't even check the maintenance costs over time of a moto they're purchasing, because they're baller.
    #20