Scrambler Ducati....yep...its back!

Discussion in 'Moto Bellissima: All Other Dualsports' started by Jbone11 11, Jun 9, 2014.

  1. tennmoto

    tennmoto Been here awhile Supporter

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    I had trouble with my Icon starting, and it was fueling too. So I starting looking and I test rode an R9T Pure and fell
    In love. And it starts right up every time . I was going to give the Icon to the dealer to fix but it had just been in for its
    First service and they were too busy with warranty work to get me in a reasonable time. The handling and feel
    Of the Scrambler are awesome but I hated that it wouldn’t start reliable.

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  2. LuciferMutt

    LuciferMutt Rides slow bike slow

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    I was eyeballing R9Ts as well, but the local dealer only stocked the fancy ones and wanted ridiculous prices for all of them. The W I bought was a leftover 2019 on clearance and was already discounted so I knew they'd play ball to let it go for even less.
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  3. tennmoto

    tennmoto Been here awhile Supporter

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    That W1 look cool, congrats
  4. JaySwear

    JaySwear Been here awhile

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    I’m afraid of the R9T. I know one test ride and I’d probably be screwed. I was actually extremely close to putting a deposit on one before they were released but decided I wanted to see one first!
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  5. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Long timer

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    The R9T was one of the major reasons I got the Scrambler. I was nice, but... and 'but' is one of the tickiest words in the English language...
  6. HiJincs

    HiJincs Dreamer Supporter

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    My son is a bike whore and has a R9T Urban, he "says" its the one bike he'll never get rid of. I would have followed him except for the prices.
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  7. TheJRM

    TheJRM HEY YOU GUYS!!!

    Joined:
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    People's Republic of Massachusetts
    Former V-Strom owner here. I'm thinking about picking up a 2020 Scrambler (Icon Dark), as I'm looking for a fun, smaller bike for short day rides and an even shorter commute (8 miles with just 6 of those being on the highway) but some of the talk on this thread is scaring me off a bit. Is the suspension really that bad? Does the engine throw of that much heat? The Strom (2018 650xt) I owned did everything really well, especially highway riding. I road most of the Puppy Dog trail on it up in VT and, besides suspension that was overwhelmed at times, the bike did great. So easy to ride on the highway. Alas... as great as it was, I just found it completely boring and never had any desire to take it out for some back road cruising just for fun. It was a great tool, and probably the most practical bike I have ever owned, but I found that I had zero desire to ride it for anything but the daily commute or occasional trip on the highway.

    I test rode a Scrambler a few years back but the test ride was far too short to really get a sense for the bike. I remember it being small and very easy to ride with pretty good torque to boot. Naked on the highway, but that's to be expected.

    So my question is: For a guy that is looking for a fun bike to use for spirited back road rides, cruising around town and perhaps the once per year trip up to VT to ride some of the country roads (dirt and pavement), am I looking in the right place? Small, nimble and simple are my top priorities this time around. One of the funnest bikes I have ever owned was a TW200 (we've had 3 of them) and I have always looked at the Scrambler as a T-Dub on steroids.
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  8. JaySwear

    JaySwear Been here awhile

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    I honestly think the Scrambler is a great all-round bike. I think the two biggest flaws are easily the heat and the suspension. I rode for a long time on stock suspension until I finally upgraded the rear! In all honesty I probably could have saved that money. The fork is still stock and maybe that would make all the difference, but I’m having a hard time talking myself into spending the money on that upgrade without knowing first.
    It definitely can get hot! This was the first year I decided not to wear a good motorcycle jacket and wore a jersey instead when it was 95 degrees and up. Dumb? Yeah, but I was much more comfortable! In anything under 85 Fahrenheit I don’t think the engine heat is an issue, and above that it’s only bad if you’re stopped for a minute or two at a light.
    I think those two issues are talked about the most just because it’s a great bike in most other respects. ...except the seat :lol2
  9. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Long timer

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    I made essentrially the same jump, for the same reasons, from a Tiger 800 Roadie to a 2919 Scrambler Icon. My conclusions

    1) The Scrambler is much nippier, nimbler, and more fun than the Tiger was -- my choice for short day rides, and serious Bring A Smile To One's Face material!

    2) That engine is a joy -- pure distilled sex, bottled in a 90 degree V-twin.

    3) The Scrambler passes the 'go out to the garage to look at it late at night' test with flying colors -- in this case Atomic Tangerine. Which may be why my wife has claimed dibs on it.

    4) The lighter weight lets me take it places I wouldn't with the Tiger. And be able to pick it up if one of those places turns out to have been a mistake.

    5) Heat is not an issue -- pretty much the same as the Tiger.

    6) Luggage was a bit of a trick -- no 'carry everything but the kitchen sink' topcase -- but solvable.

    7) There's no point in trying to get wind protection. Just bolt on a flyscreen and have fun (see note above about Bring A Smile To One's Face material)..

    8) Range isn't dismal, but it's noticeably less than the wee-Strom, and you will find youself keeping it in mind if you leave civilization behind (see below).

    x20r60.IMG_1733.jpg

    9) And ah yes... that suspension...

    It may not live up to the rest of the bike, but its impossible to guess whether or not you'll decide it really is that bad. Some people don't seem to mind it at all . Others -- I was one -- can't stand it, happy though it might make whoever replaces their dental fillings. If you can arrange for a test ride on a Road With A Very Bad Surface, like the one in that picture turned into a few miles farther on as the paving gave out, this may answer your questions. Still, note that swapping in a better rear shock and fiddling with the fork oil and springs is comparetively inexpensive, and something one can do with tools one probably has lying around the house.

    Bottom line: I'm glad I made the change. Still, my go-to bike is a Moto Guzzi, so my judgement may be open to question :D
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  10. TheJRM

    TheJRM HEY YOU GUYS!!!

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    Great feedback guys. Thank you. Lots to think about...
  11. HiJincs

    HiJincs Dreamer Supporter

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    I sold my DL650 for the 2019 Full Throttle as detailed above and never looked back. I bought it for exactly what you are looking to do. I've been on two longish (+100 miles) rides over the last two weekends and had a blast. Heat wasn't an issue and I'm ok for now with the stock suspension. My last ride included about 20 miles of hwy speeds, (70'ish) that wasn't pleasant but was tolerable.
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  12. JaySwear

    JaySwear Been here awhile

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    Thought this might be the year I finally sold off the Scrambler, but its looking more and more like this will be the year of the upgrades. Or at least one big one, my goal for this offseason is to get some (ANY) kind of upgrade on the front end of this thing. Can't really make the front fork any worse! It looks like the Andreani cartridge is really the only option. Just afraid I'm going to drop $900 on a negligible difference in ride feel.
  13. marc2

    marc2 Adventurer

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    UK/Italy
    I've got a Maxton insert in my right fork leg which is an improvement but I also raised the forks 10mm which definately improved the ride and handling by putting more weight over the front, so that maybe worth trying.

    Dave Moss tuning on YouTube suggests changing the fork oil to 20 weight in the left and 5 weight in the right. I haven't done this mod yet but it's definitely on the to do list.
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  14. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Long timer

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    The difference will be far from negligable! It could totally transfoprm the bike into the machine you always wanted. But be sure to get the spring rate right. Search the web, ask around, find out what other people your weight are using, and consider going 5-10% softer if they do track but you ride rough roads.

    I weigh in around 190 lbs with gear and can of soda, and I'm running the spring rate of 8.0 N/mm that Ohlins reconmmended. It's a bit too firm for the kind of riding I do, and I wish I'd gone with slightly less.
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  15. JaySwear

    JaySwear Been here awhile

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    Cool! Maybe it will be worth it then. As you are both probably aware I've spent the last 4 years in a love/hate relationship with my bike, but the new on-road oriented tires have really made me appreciate what it is a lot more. Maybe it's time to invest in the ride again rather than shopping around for a replacement!
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  16. JaySwear

    JaySwear Been here awhile

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    Got this cool new tail bag yesterday. I love SW Motech stuff! Super well made, came with a rain cover and shoulder strap. Should be perfect for throwing some shoes in for the ride to work or some water bottles and snacks for a day ride. Should also let me still cargo net some stuff to the rack at the same time if need be.

    AND I took advantage of a Cyber Monday deal to pick up some new fork springs. The Matris FRK kit. I think having any adjustability in the forks will be a life changer.

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  17. JohninVT

    JohninVT Long timer

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    After riding it a full year I've decided to throw some money at my Street Classic to see if I can improve the things that are less than stellar. My Mt60's are trash at 2,800 miles. I bought a set of TKC70's to replace them. There's not a ton of info out there on TKC70's despite the tires having been around for a while. I didn't want to lose the ability to ride gravel but I also didn't feel like buying another set of MT60's since the lifespan of them is so short. I guess I'll find out in a few months if I made a mistake.

    My right heel hits the stock heatshield and I've dragged the muffler a few times. I decided to spring for the Competition Werkes exhaust. It sucks that you have to buy the dB killer separately but I'm hoping the exhaust gives my boot a little more room and that it tucks into the bike tighter than the OEM muffler and doesn't drag so easily.

    Lastly, the suspension is atrocious. It's probably the worst of any motorcycle I've owned since 1984. My daughter's 1973 CT90 has more acceptable spring rates than my Scrambler. I'm going to try the Hyperpro Street Box. It's a three way adjustable shock and a front spring with(hopefully) a rate that doesn't try to break my wrists on every road imperfection. For $700+ shipping it's probably the least expensive package that addresses both front and rear. I don't need a magic carpet ride. I just want something halfway decent.

    I don't know what to do about the seat. It's almost as bad as a DRZ400. I could ride the stock seat about 20-30 minutes before I'd have to get off. I bought the "comfort" seat and now I can sit on it about 45 minutes before having to get off the bike. The comfort seat is an 1" higher. It feels like it needs another inch on top of that and firmer foam. Doing that would mean I'd have to either get taller bars or risers. I might try cutting the toolbox hump out and riveting a flat piece of plastic over the hole. A few guys have done that and reported it improved the seat. It can't make it any worse.
  18. DesertPilot

    DesertPilot Long timer

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    Do you know what spring rate Hyperpro gives you? According to my notes, at 190 lbs with gear, I got a spring rate of 8 N/mm with my Ohlins setup, and it's fine for street, but when the road gets rough, I wish I'd gone with 5-10% less -- maybe around 7.2?
  19. JohninVT

    JohninVT Long timer

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    I don't yet. I know it's one size fits all and you can't get a custom rate. I'm going to call EPM later this afternoon or tomorrow morning.
  20. Lomax

    Lomax Nanu-Nanu Adventurer Supporter

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    I sold my desert sled and got a different scrambler. :D

    [​IMG]

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