Seattle to Argentina on a KLR650

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by OZYMANDIAS, May 7, 2006.

  1. scootertrash

    scootertrash Mobile Homie

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Oddometer:
    2,074
    Location:
    "My leg's tired, let's live here."
    +1 on the PP acct, I want to help too. My prayers are with you, I started reading your thread when it began and then stumbled across this bad news. You have a great attitude!
  2. DaleB

    DaleB Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    438
    Location:
    Rollin' somewhere
    hope this note finds you in good spirits, no doubt it will!
    we're thinking and praying for your speedy recovery.

    all the best,
    dale
  3. NoMystery

    NoMystery Jesse's Girl

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2005
    Oddometer:
    9,956
    Location:
    Location Location: between Atlanta & the mountains
    Clayton,

    This song has played on the radio alot lately, almost everytime I drive somewhere... I want to go buy the CD, even though I don't listen to alot of Country these days. Anyways, I have cried my eyes out everytime I hear it; because, it makes me truly feel for you. I'm getting choked up again, just tryin to post this... tears of joy too, as I'm so proud of you for your mental strength :gdog Hang in there, friend.

    Life aint always beautiful
    Sometimes it's just plain hard
    Life can knock you down, it can break your heart

    Life aint always beautiful
    You think you're on your way
    And it's just a dead end road at the end of the day

    But the struggles make you stronger
    And the changes make you wise
    And happiness has its own way of takin it's sweet time

    CHORUS
    No, life aint always beautiful
    Tears will fall sometimes
    Life aint always beautiful
    But it's a beautiful ride

    Life aint always beautiful
    Some days I miss your smile
    I get tired of walkin all these lonely miles

    And I wish for just one minute
    I could see your pretty face
    Guess I can dream, but life don’t work that way

    But the struggles make me stronger
    And the changes make me wise
    And happiness has its own way of takin it's sweet time

    No, life aint always beautiful
    But i know i'll be fine
    Hey, life aint always beautiful
    But it's a beautiful ride
    What a beautiful ride

    -Gary Allen
  4. OZYMANDIAS

    OZYMANDIAS RIP, Clayton...

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    33
    Hello Friends-
    I just got done reading a number of threads and am, once again, so thankful for what all of you are doing for me. And again, forgive me for not responding to each of you individually, but perhaps it is better to write one longer note so I can say more rather than repeating similar things many times.

    It is about day seventeen in the hospital, and though there have been delays, it looks like I’ll be going to rehab tomorrow. I now have very little pain at the site of the surgery, and have regained my appetite somewhat. I’m still able to do very little, and honestly lying in bed for so long is a bit maddening. I can do a bit with a light dumbbell, and am able to pull myself on my side using the rails, and to pull myself upright using a grip they hung above me.

    I’ve been honest with everyone until now, and feel that anything less would compromise the value of the relationship I’ve come to have with all of you, and show insufficient gratitude for all that everyone has done for me. I’m having a hard time, my friends. Everyone praises me for my attitude and spirit, but I’m not so sure. I fear waking up in the morning, because of the reality that immediately sets upon me. I was once so strong and capable. I frequently felt joy, and always had hope. Now it’s not clear at all to me that I will ever again come to view my life as worthwhile. Heavy thoughts force themselves upon me all day long, and I sometimes cry.
    It does not surprise me that I am feeling this way just now, but the future also seems like such a black and frightening question mark. I’m concerned now about my capacity to succeed at law school and deal with this at the same time. Even before my accident, it took a tremendous amount of work and effort to keep myself moving upward. How will I maintain that while fighting this threat to my spirit?

    I suppose the essence of things might be somewhat simple. Before, I had a choice of striving and enduring and making it to the top of the mountain, or of falling by the wayside. Now, I have the same choice, but about 120 pounds of my body is, in effect, dead, and if I’m going to get to the same place I’m just going to have to drag it along with me a little at a time, both literally and metaphorically. There are so many unknowns for me just now, that all I can seem to do is keep my composure as best I can, do what the doctors tell me, and deal with things as they come my way.

    Things seem so complex, and I feel that the way I’m expressing myself betrays that I’m losing the battle. I don’t know what to think about that. You have all inspired me, and I wish I could be more of an inspiration to all of you, but this is how I’m feeling. I don’t want to be a doomsayer or discourage anyone from pursuing a life of adventure, because I can honestly say that I don’t regret having chosen to go on this trip. If I found I could stand and walk tomorrow, I’d fix my bike up and finish the ride, absolutely, albeit far more cautiously. I just want you all to understand what a horrible nightmare this is for me, and how greatly becoming like me is to be feared. Keep riding my friends. There is cowardice and foolhardiness, and courage is right in the middle.

    Just so you all know I’m not completely lost, I can still enjoy the company of my hot nurses and would like to put my arms around them, and there are certainly moments when I smile and laugh. I’m working on my laptop now via a wireless connection, but I’m told that rehab only has dial-up, so hopefully I’ll be able to figure that out, because it has been about six years. I’ll be in touch everyone. Again, thank you all so very much. Clayton
  5. danbrew

    danbrew GSAdv.com

    Joined:
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    South Carolina
    Clayton - the feelings you're faced with are so entirely reasonable and predictable that it's a wonder that's not the first thing the docs said to you.

    I'm so sorry what happened happened. But..., my friend, you've got the rest of your very long life left to consider these things. You can give up and not survive, or you can adapt and kick some serious ass. There's no doubt in my mind about what you'll do.

    My words may seem harsh - but they're to the point. The world will not stop turning tomorrow. 24 hours from now and you'll have encountered 24 hours - 1440 minutes - 86400 seconds. That time will pass whether you give up or whether you make the most of it.

    So... make the most of it.

    I'm pulling for 'ya pal. Now go get your law degree 'cause I'm quite certain I'll need somebody to get me out of prison one day.

    :lol3
  6. SFKLR

    SFKLR Noob. Again.

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Oddometer:
    375
    Clayton,

    You are brave, and you are courageous. No one could possibly think any less of you for having doubts, pain, fears and sadness. You are a human being, for goodness sake! I'm sure you will have an opportunity to speak about your feelings with others who have similar conditions, and with professionals who can help you understand and deal with them.

    In the meantime you should know that we all want to read what you were going to write about your trip, and we all want to know what other adventures you plan to take in your life.

    I am an attorney myself, with 10 years of practice behind me, and I know without a doubt that your ability to be a great attorney--to make a difference in the laws of this country, in policy, in helping people, and in fighting injustice--has not been affected by the accident. You are accepted to one of the best law schools in the country, and the sky is the limit for your success in this field. Here in San Francisco, we have a Supervisor who was paralyzed in a ski lift accident in her teens or early 20's, I think. I wouldn't be surprised if she became a Congresswoman or Senator some day. She got married and is raising a family. Passing the bar was the hardest thing I ever did. Once you've battled the emotions and physical limitations of your injury through three years of law school, the bar should be a piece of cake.

    Obviously the future is going to be very different than you imagined, and things like success and failure, even what makes you happy, will be re-defined in the years ahead. Maybe being a lawyer is your future. Maybe owning a motorcycle shop. Maybe you'll be a writer. Maybe a motivational speaker. Who knows? Maybe all of the above. I would like to think that any guy who has the courage to take that motorcycle trip on his own like you did clearly has the courage and everything it takes to battle through the toughest times. You know why? Because if it happens to me (and it could happen to any of us), I would like to know that you showed us the path, Clayton, and left a roadmap to follow. We're all thinking of you.
  7. OMGWTF

    OMGWTF Wherever I may roam

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2006
    Oddometer:
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    Clayton, we might often talk in Hallmark-card sentiment about this, but we do realize the torture you're going through and don't pretend that you're always Mr.-100% positive-attitude-guy. I think your situation has driven us all to look inward to try to put ourselves in your shoes and attempt to empathise with your situation. Personally, it has stimulated a lot of introspection into my own attitude and the limits of my courage and strength and has made me realize to at least some degree how difficult things must be for you and how difficult it must be to consistently maintain a positive attitude.

    I think you face one of the most difficult challenges that people can face and IMHO holding on to hope and keeping your attitude as positive as possible, as often as possible, can help by giving you that extra push through the difficult challenges that face you. One of these challenges is to survive the discouraging thoughts and emerge with a drive to persevere and succeed. You're surrounded by supportive people who want nothing more than to see you make it through this. Keep your dukes up.
  8. roberts

    roberts GS'er

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2002
    Oddometer:
    466
    Location:
    Texas
    Clayton,

    During the short visit we had at the hospital I could tell that you have the internal strength and attitude that will help you get through the most difficult days. I cannot begin to understand all that you are going through, but I am available anytime to help in any way that I can.

    Robert
  9. Saltlick

    Saltlick Eat More Possum

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2006
    Oddometer:
    46
    Location:
    Up a creek
    I really don't know what to say friend. I just wanted you to know that my heart is heavy, and...I'm just really sad about this. God Bless your heart.
  10. BMWBard

    BMWBard Mystic Rider

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2005
    Oddometer:
    858
    Location:
    much too close to San Francisco :P
    Hi Clayton

    It's tough to know what to say right now. part of what's happening to you with the dark thoughts is something you already know and mentioend --just lying around. Starting rehab and actually being able to DO something about it will help that enormously. Another part is relative isolation, and you can always get on the laptop now and at least blather on about this, your trip, and anything else in here :D

    yeah, once you get the dial up thing down. I am on solely dial up, I'd be lost with wifi. How's that for an admission? :evil

    Let's talk about school for a minute. I am fairly cognizant of what it takes to get through law school as one of my classmates did a dual degree by permission, taking alternate years. I am also fairly cognizant of getting through school despite odds against not faced by most people. So, in someone's words, since it's too early for a bedtime story, here's a wakin up story.

    The protagonist of this one is 18, fresh out of high school graduation, sittin with the newspaper in her parent's rented farmhouse looking for a room in town when our story opens, trying to figure how to pay for daily life and the tuition at the local community college on a minimum wage job. In walks her mom. "You know we don't have the money to do anything to help with the costs," she says, "but what we can do is make a deal with you...you stay here and keep on with the farm work, and in return get room and board and gas for the old beater to get back and forth to work and college. How's that sound?"

    A break!

    Armed with brains, a place to live and no worries about food and transportation, our gal concentrated on The Plan...start at the local CC to save tuition money, apply at the nearest uni for the rest of undergrad, then at the only grad school in the state to carry curriculum for her major (out of state tuition being totally out of the question) at an appropriate time, use her paycheck for the costs of schooling and to save up for university. It wouldn't be enough, but by then --two years in the future-- she'd have something figured out for the rest of the money. Getting accepted into grad school in that area is notoriously difficult, so that had to be the main area of concentration.

    A few speed bumps appeared along the way, however. Some of them don't bar repeating for one reason or another. A few of them are unusual enough to warrant mention to flavor the story...
    the meeting with a university advisor just before Christmas break, an annual event set up by the local community college and held on its premises, in which she found out that her classes were not set up correctly to get her to the point of application to grad school in two years. (A few years later she found out that the grad school deliberately refused to give out information on the reqs to apply by telephone or written request or even meeting with an official by high school students or graduates not yet in an undergraduate college because they felt that students had the idea if they filled the reqs they would automatically be accepted, and that was why she'd been left to figure out her schedule on her own for the first year.) Solution? Initial shock, followed by total revamp of class schedule for the next semester and the relocation of one major class to summer session to be taken concurrently with full time work, handwalking it around to get it approved in time, winning a few arguments (nicely) with the people who said 18 hours was too much.
    the birth of a nephew to her sister who became very ill afterwards and was unable to care for the baby, and whose husband was incapable of caring for both wife and baby and working too. The little boy was raised by our gal and her mom for the first two years of his life. The family joke was that she was his substitute dad, since she vanished most days to work/school and took care of him amidst homework with hand offs to grandma while doing farm chores. Those were funny days, especially in the beginning, but once the routine was established, it all went smoothly. Get up in the morning, set up the baby's bottle to warm (later his dish of soft foods with the hot water inlet to warm the stuff up for him), fly outside to feed chickens check their waterers and collect eggs, feed/water the dog and the cats, feed the stock and check their waterer (and in winter in good weather return to let them outside just before leaving the farm), fly back in with the egg basket to set by the sink, say hi to mom who was feeding the baby, get breakfast, eat her share quickly, change clothes and zoom out the door with all needed items for the day. Zoom back home between classes and work, or between lecture type classes and late night labs, take care of the animals again, relieve mom at babycare, take care of extras, homework, etc, eat dinner, zoom back out the door. Three times a week get home between 11 and midnight, having had class till 10 and picked up whatever was needed at the 24 hour grocery in town while being stared at by the old biddies due to the lack of a wedding ring...:lol3 Weekends the same except for being home much earlier since work was dayshift then.
    Having to drop the hour load from 18 to 12 to fit babycare around homework, ok since a need arose to apply to the local private college for two classes. Third year of undergrad spent zooming back and forth across town from community college to private university and back with farmchores whenever needed and work stuck in at all possible intervals, a minimum wage job but with as many hours as she asked for since after the regular full time cashier left she was the only one who could infallibly make the old manual cash register work no matter what shenanigans it pulled (including telling customers to stand back and giving the thing a hard kick when it jammed). Don't forget raising a raft of fruit flies and rats in her bedroom to fill the reqs for two projects normally done in the labs at the private college, by special permission.

    And in the middle of this, another break! Physics was required, but to take physics you had to have trig first...that year the head of the math department at the community college was teaching the class due to last minute cancellation by the usual teacher, and he choose to decide the issue by aquainting the class with the situation and asking them if any of them objected to this student using a trig function calculator for tests, although they would have to do those calcs by hand themselves. Not one person in the class objected! Good people.

    Not making the final cut at application to grad school a year later, after a year of work and uni undergrad classes, and going back home (uni was close enough to drive) every weekend to keep up on the farmwork. She'd made the first cut easily --they took all applicants and rated them, and re considered the top 250. Solution? Shock, dismay, some private tears, followed by a talk with the admissions fellow who'd been on the interview committee. He explained that the committee had downgraded her points for lacking a rec from a uni prof and an optional class and for her answer to the question "what type of books do you like to read?" because they didn't like braggers who tried to look good. (Our gal had about 1000 books at home, mostly used paperbacks and old hardcovers, and had answered truthfully and innocently "Just about everything." and listed the categories of her home library... :lol3 ) Next, on the admissions dean's advice, a fifth year of undergrad including specific classes, plus a lot of planning on what to try to switch to if the application failed again.
    The bankruptcy of her stepfather's employer, a job that had kept him away from home the majority of the time but paid enough to keep the family going, just 2 years before his pension would have started, and no work for the thousands out on their butts...espeically with the union req that their pensions be figured not on their full 20 years or more but only on their last two years wages...and the worries and changes that brought.

    The second application made it by virtue of a third AND fourth break. Asked to give her opinion of the prof who'd written her reccomendation, our gal again resorted to honesty (you'd think she'd learn, hey?) "As a professor, he's one of the best I've ever seen. As a man, he's, uh, rather eccentric." Well yes, in that time period, a prof who wore multicolored emboridered tunics preferentially might be called that. Why'd she asked for his rec instead of someone else's? She'd met him buying rabbit food in the pet store one day, and taken the opportunity to ask how he got away with such eye shocking combinations at work. Turned out he was color blind and not in the least shy about it. Thanked her for bringing the clashes to his attention, and said he'd get a friend to repin his garments so he could tell. This btw made him an even more amazing teacher. He habitually drew elaborate diagrams using colored chalk for the class, diagrams everyone bought colored pencil sets to copy and which at least one student retains to this day. Mentioning the color blindness to a classmate the next week, our gal was informed on a gasp that she was now going to flunk the class, because you did NOT talk to uni profs like that, no matter what was ok in a community college, and promptly made an appointment with the guy to ask if this was true. Out of that appointment grew a series of talks which spawned the rec letter. Turned out the prof was known for honest eval, had given her a good one, and the interview committe thoguht she was maligning him. After she left the room one of them said into the general condemnation "Such and such is a personal friend of mine, and he IS eccentric. He raises rabbits in his basement by the free range method, for one thing. I'd say you better rethink this...someone that honest will be a credit to our profession."

    So she was in! :clap but the speed bumps continued. :huh

    She was a hands on kinda gal, and grad school has the cream of the crop intellectually. She had to work danged hard during the classroom years. and the course load...18 hours was nothing compared to 22 and 24 And 26! An extra course the first semester for those who had come up through liberal arts and sciences instead of another undergrad college (no regrets, better all around education that way). Becoming her mom's sole emotional support as her grandmother suffered half a dozen EACH heart attacks and strokes during the critical second half of first year and then going on probation as her schoolwork suffered. Hiding the fact that she was working full time to pay bills, since grad school rules were that anyone working over ten hours weekly was expelled. Going BACK on probation the second semester of her junior year, with a higher req to come off it this second time, due to accumulated strain and fatigue and more family troubles.

    But that wasn't a problem...senior year was almost all hands on, and she knew she'd practically ace it. Which she did, until....one day another student failed to follow SOP in a rotation that required extremely long hours and some heavy work, and so our gal barely escaped death or permanent maiming one early morning. Still shaken, when called in to talk to the head of that area about something else and asked what was wrong, she told him what had happened. This fellow was fond of saying that students didn't work hard enough these days, and that they had to pay their dues, and tuned out to be rather out of touch with certain realities our gal inadvertantly informed him of with this conversation. Result...he literally went into a rage, told her he was having her expelled, go home, and don't come back. Solution? Ya got me! Our gal went to the grad school's Dean and described the incident. "Were you aware he is a diabetic, and has problems with mood swings?" the Dean asked, while explaining that yes Prof suchandsuch had the power to force a student's expulsion because they didn't want to lose him. Oh oh! Well, our gal went home and waited, as per the Dean's advice. A few days later she's called back into school. Her classmates were told she was ill. The Prof called a little meeting and told everyone that it had come to his attention that people on his rotation were notorious throughout the school for missing or coming very late to their "electives" (a certain number of classroom hours had to be taken senior year, but you chose what you wanted to take) and arrangements were made for others to hand them notes as well as accomodations made for their tests because his colleagues all understood it was because of the serious overload of work and hours they had. From now on, he said, we are arranging things so that you get to your electives. (Give him points, he actually talked to the other profs about this, and changed his mind on the expulsion basd on what they told him.) Back in! Whew! Almost lost it in the last year!!!:eek1
    And then the feddie exams...real beasts to pass...

    After all of this, have a look. There's our gal, degree in hand!

    Hey Clayton. All of that stuff is not having to figure out how to get a wheelchair into a building, how to carry your books on it, how to....etc. You have a rough roe to how there, my friend. If you think our gal showed spunk, courage, stick-to-it-ivness, don't think for a minute there were not plenty of times when she sat in her room (or in a corner of the pasture) and bawled her eyes out, sleptwalk though a week, pounded her fists on a pillow in utter but quiet frustration, wailed to the sky "not again!" or "why is all of this happening? or "geez, haven't I done enough yet?" Or that there weren't times she got sick and tired of being cheerful/competant/upbeat, of zooming around doing everything that had to be done, of dragging herself out of bed because she'd forgotten to take care of something and recalled it just at the point of sleep, of beng woken up by a baby that was born sick and had colic most nights for months and wasn't even _really_ her responsibility... Don't think she never questioned if it was worth it, or wanted to give up, or wondered if in the end....

    Don't pretend to be upbeat all the time, when you're feeling sad, or angry, or scared. Go right ahead and say something. You have to do the work, Clay, no one here or at home can do that for you. You have to find and display the courage, the determination, the fierce will to be the most you can be and get the most back you can and do what you want to do. But we and your other firends can help you find it at moments when you've misplaced it, when you want to bawl your eyes out, give up, rest for a moment that becomes a lifetime, or mourn and get so lost in the mourning that you can't quite see the path anymore. Talk to Dale, Photog, Geode, and the others who have a better idea of what you face. And let the rest of us help as we can.

    You can make it.
  11. DaleB

    DaleB Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2005
    Oddometer:
    438
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    Rollin' somewhere
    :cry

    i'm so sorry you have been put in this position, clayton. i have a unique insight into what you're facing over the next few months and i can say, based on my experience, that it will get easier. you will get stronger.

    it's impossible not to grieve for your loss, and no one expects you to. hell, it's impossible for all of us not to grieve for your loss.

    you are in the midst of a bonafide tragedy, with no way out but through the thick of it. but you know that, don't need to hear it from me.

    something that was helpful to me that i was reluctant to do at first, but am grateful i did (with some prodding from folks wiser than myself), is to actively seek out and join the 'disabled community'. it was a scary proposition for me to come to terms with the fact that i was made a member of this community and for the first month i avoided everyone on my rehab floor like the plague. they all seemed so sick and broken. i didn't see myself like that at all and it took some time for me to realize i have something to offer, both abled bodied and disabled communties.

    your pain now will serve a purpose, what the purpose will be is up to you.

    suffering and wisdom often come hand in hand.

    give yourself time, my friend, and thank you for showing us your strength by sharing your fears - it speaks volumes.

    it's hard to hear compliments and praise when you are filled with self doubt, but know that what people tell you is genuine and everytime someone tells you that you have inspired them in some way don't forget that they truly mean it and that you have made a positive influence in their life - whether or not you are having a bad day. this is proof of goodness resultant of tragedy. goodness for others is goodness for you, tenfold. trust in that!

    peace,
    dale
  12. Flyingavanti

    Flyingavanti With the Redhead on Back!

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    Oddometer:
    1,555
    Clayton and Dale............

    I have follow both of your threads on a DAILY basis, and it has moved me through many emotions. I know that both of you have been through things that none of can imagine.

    Dale and Clayton, I think of you guys nearly every mile that we ride.

    How any of us could be only a few seconds away from what has happened to you. It has induced me to ride much more sanely and conservatively. I don't think I am paraniod, but I am constantly checking the location of every car or truck for as far behind me and ahead of me.... for as far as I can see. And I look every driver in the eyes that is within 200 feet of me.

    Clayton, I just enjoyed 300 miles of riding through Uruguay and thought of you every time I saw an animal near the roadside.

    Sandy and I are so sorry for what happened to each of you. The lessons and observations you have given us is priceless. I just wish the lessons where not at such an expense to you guys.

    Clayton, we were really hoping to meet you some day, somewhere in South America. As we all learn in life, plans change. If you would permit, I would love to meet you someday, in the good old USA.

    The same applys to you, DaleB. Sandy and I also plan to travel east, and it would be and honor to meet you, the wife and the new one coming!

    Again, you two are in our thoughts and prayers.

    Sincerely,

    Dale and Sandy
  13. Nata Harli

    Nata Harli Accidental Tourista

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,566
    Location:
    Kansas City, MISSOURI
    Clayton,

    I just found your trip report today and was thoroughly enjoying it as a friend and I are heading to Mexico on the 22nd. I especially enjoyed the first pictures of you and could not help but be impressed with your smile and all the joy behind it. Whatever you do keep your spirits up, your dreams alive and, especially, never lose that wonderful smile.

    This is a wonderful community - more so than anyone outside of it realizes. I see where MichoColumbia sent you a PM and I'm hoping he shared his story with you about what this community did for him.

    My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family my fellow AdvRider.
  14. Flaco

    Flaco Zombie Holocaust

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,364
    Location:
    Historic Montrose CO
    Hey Oz,

    Just another lame post to tell you to I'm thinking of you.

    No idea what else to say.

    Rehab will probably suck ass, but you'll have a change of scenery. If I were you, I'd start complaining about the slow dial up connection immediately. Seems like the least they could do is get you a decent connection.

    Work hard at it, take it five minutes at a time. I hope your Physical Therapist is one of those super hot texas chicks and you break her heart to pieces.

    Much love,

    Flaco
  15. longtallsally

    longtallsally Yeah I'm a chick

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2006
    Oddometer:
    5,381
    Location:
    Escaped from Kalifornistan
    I have no idea what to say other than this moved me. I think this is my first post on advrider, but I just want you to know, Clayton, that your spirit is now in me. I know I didn't give much, but I want you to know that you have impacted me in the same way that Wayne Rainey, Vincent Haskovec, and others injured by that which we love. When I read this, my heart dropped- that a brother had been hurt.

    I really don't know what else to add. KNOW THAT YOU CAN DO THIS!!!!!!!!! Don't EVER forget that. Be strong. Don't give up the fight.
  16. mudronin

    mudronin Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 27, 2006
    Oddometer:
    10
    clayton,

    there is little left unsaid. though i never met you i lived through you, the trips that make up my dreams. i have been blessed with many things, most importantly, my family. it was stated that this is a loving community, but in reality this is YOUR extended family.

    commonalities have brought you here and you were accepted no questions asked. you have since inspired and motivated us to be aware of our riding and that adventure can also mean the unexpected, be it good or bad.

    i had initially intended to relate a similar story that i was involved in but after reading through it it seemed i was hijacking your thread. so instead i have decided to offer my prayers and funds that you acheive your goals in life and law.

    i also see you finishing your trip, which i would also donate to. you still have use of your arms and as i recall, you could operate a trike with very few modifications. would make one heck of a graduation gift:) until then, may you live your dreams through our adventures as we have through yours.

    good luck and god speed my friend. i am only a phone call away. just pm me any time and ill give you my # to chat, vent, laugh or cry, it doesnt matter.

    mud & family
  17. R.J.

    R.J. split personality

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2006
    Oddometer:
    1,118
    Location:
    Refinery Row
    Clayton:

    I just read this thread for the first time. Part of me says I don't know what to say but my heart is bursting with emotion. As many replies have said, we are all seconds away from an event like yours each time get on our bikes and we all know it, but we ride anyway despite what we know.

    There is no question that you are faced with a tragedy that would rock anyone's world to very core. The fact that you can express your emotions / fears serves testament to your strength. Anyone in your situation that can give back through this personal tragedy is a HERO in my book. That spirit will overcome any challenges put in your path.

    God Speed Clayton

    Larry and Tracey
  18. OZYMANDIAS

    OZYMANDIAS RIP, Clayton...

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2006
    Oddometer:
    33
    Just a short one, because I have to get back in bed soon. They got me up in a wheelchair and I rolled myself a bit today. I read all of your posts. Thank you all for the encouraging and inspirational words and stories. I guess I don't have a ton to say just now, and I almost didn't want to write because of that, but I thought I should check in. Though I haven't been feeling the best, I have been cooperating with all of my therapy and trying my hardest, which at least gives me something to focus on. Many people have visited me and called me, and I have received a tremendous amount of kindness from complete strangers. Hopefully I can get online more often now, but for now, best wishes to all, and I'll write again soon. Clayton
  19. Flaco

    Flaco Zombie Holocaust

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Oddometer:
    2,364
    Location:
    Historic Montrose CO
    Oz,

    Are you still in Houston?

    We're not complete strangers, we're all riders, right?

    Do you have a DVD player there? Could we send you movies to watch or would you like an Xbox or something like that to pass the time?

    Flaco
  20. malmon

    malmon Unknown Noobody

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    Oddometer:
    325
    Location:
    Gburg
    double post.
    please see below