Securing a motorcycle left outside?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Colorad0, Aug 28, 2019.

  1. Paul124ac

    Paul124ac Long timer

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    I’m on the wrong phone so I can’t post a pic (there’s some on the shiny things thread on carrying bikes), we have a chain with a soft nylon cover and a good lock to lock the bike on, had a python lock but they are so bloody easy to defeat, with the chain you’ll need a grinder-still easy but noisy. Also got a hitch pin lock as what’s easier than stealing the whole bloody lot? Used to travel with a cover but like stated they do cause damage. We put a pull-out awning on the back so when we’re parked for any length of time the bike is in shade, also handy for maintenance. BTW don’t just lock a wheel to the carrier, dead easy to leave the wheel behind, the chain we have is long enough to go thru both wheels, the frame, and the carrier. I’ve also put a crash cam on the back that records on a loop, and I’m looking into gps trackers with Bluetooth geofencing. We’re about to do an extended trip with two emtb’s, a hobie kayak and an Aprilia Capo Rally on a trailer plus all the gear, real easy to nick the trailer and there goes close on $40k worth of stuff. Insurance company wanted close to 2 grand to cover it but only for damage not theft. Of course the Ape is covered separately but that still leaves $10k worth of pushies and a $3k kayak. The crash cam was $300, the tracker is around the same plus a sim and data costs which are dependant on how many times it reports. Mainly looking at it for the geofence capability, Bluetooth straight to the phone which is also handy if you’re parked and shopping or eating etc.
    #21
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  2. HuntWhenever

    HuntWhenever Motorcicle Commuter

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    Had you considered a toy-hauler motorhome? You sacrifice a little in the floorplan, but its nice to have a small garage with you. A 38' to 40' toy-hauler would still make a nice coach.
    #22
  3. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    Thanks, I will have to look into a tracker & geofence capability.

    We also have four high end mtbs on the back of the jeep. Chaining everything up gets old pretty quick, but I guess it beats getting stuff stolen or having to leave the toys at home.

    The hydra-lift welds onto the MH frame, so no need for a locking hitch pin. It's a hydraulic lift, that raises the bike about 3ft off the ground. Not sure if that makes it harder or easier to steal lol. But it does give me something secure to chain the bike to.

    http://hydralift-usa.com/motorhome-lift-2/

    Sounds like a nice set up you have there BTW. Good collection of toy's you'll never run out of stuff to do! We want to get a canoe but it will have to wait a year or two. Right now we have no where to put it.
    #23
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  4. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    Yeah, we considered a Thor Outlaw. Really awesome floor plan, but they quality just isn't there. They are not designed for extended trips and gas engines don't do so well in the mountains. And all of the toyhauler motor homes are gas engine. Newmar made a mid engine MH with a garage, but it involves a fair amount of compromise IIRC

    We ended up with a really nice tag axle diesel pusher. 10.9L Cummins turbo diesel engine with 450hp and 1500 ft/lb torque. Even has a 6 stage transmission retarder which is great for going back down the mountains, you don't have to touch the brakes. Lifting tag gives it a nice turning circle, and with the Hadley air ride suspension, you can raise or lower the coach. This thing is built for high elevation mountain driving out west. Drives like a dream. Cruises at 75-80 if you don't mind the fuel bill.
    #24
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  5. HuntWhenever

    HuntWhenever Motorcicle Commuter

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    I didn't realize there were no diesel toy-haulers. I figured someone would have made a side-door garage configuration diesel pusher. Bummer. But, that does explain why I always see rear lift rigs like you have on motor homes when I'm out camping.
    #25
  6. Paul124ac

    Paul124ac Long timer

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    We’ve got a 5.8 turbo Isuzu, chews around 12 miles to the gallon regardless of speed. The way I figure it is fuel is the cheap bit. That hydra lift is a cool bit of gear.
    #26
  7. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    Show hauler made a few custom ones, but they are more of a super C than a class A. You end up with a giant rig, but with a really small living area and hardly any windows. Ground clearance is also really poor.

    A class A with a hyra-lift is IMO, the best compromise between living space and bring the toys along. Unless of course you're willing to tow a big trailer and stay in commercial campgrounds. Flat towing a pickup would also be a great way to bring bikes along, but my wife doesen't want to be parking a big pickup in the national parks, while I'm out riding my bike.

    We have two young kids, so living space is important to us as is big fresh and holding tanks.
    #27
  8. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    I've lived in Oz for many years and something like that Isuzu would be perfect. There's not really the space and the infrastructure to travel around in a big class a.

    12 mpg is really, really good! We probably get 1/2 that on a good day (flat towing the jeep), but we only pay around $3 a gal for diesel, and it's about twice that in Oz IIRC.

    Like you said, the fuel is the cheap part!
    #28
  9. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Nope. It's too easy for 2 guys to pick that bike up and throw it in their pickup.

    I recommend you figure a way to keep a cable lock of some sort strung up under the motorhome frame so you can just lock it around the bike easily. Ideally, I'd run it through both the motorcycle's wheels and the frame. That at least keeps all the expensive stuff secure.

    On my hitch hauler, I use a long cable (I think it is 6-8 feet long, and about 3/8" thick) with a heavy duty padlock. I try to position the padlock behind the bike so it would be difficult to get at with bolt cutters. If they can't open the cutter far enough to get the lock all the way into the jaws, it gets very difficult to cut. Add to that equation a hardened padlock, and it increases security a lot.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    If you can find one, a cable with a built in lock is ideal This eliminates the possibility of cutting the padlock with bolt cutters. I used to have one made by the steering wheel lock company The Club. I loaned it to a friend who was storing his bike outside, but the fucker lost it when he moved.

    [​IMG]

    To me, a cover is just too much pain in the ass. If I had one over my bike, I'd probably opt not to ride it just to avoid messing with the cover. That would be a shame with a 701. :D
    #29
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  10. ChaoSS402

    ChaoSS402 Been here awhile

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    At some point you just gotta realize that you can't be completely secure. You can do what you want with the locks and if I can cut the cable, it doesn't really help much. Alarms are good but if you aren't nearby then it limits their usefulness.

    I think it's important to recognize the realistic amount of danger your bike is in. An expensive bike in an area with large amounts of organized crime where stolen bikes are easy to move needs to be secured. A low to mid range bike in a relatively low crime area (pretty much anywhere in the USA you'd want to go touring) is unlikely to be stolen anyway, and basic security measures go a long way in keeping idiots from spur of the moment bad decisions.
    #30
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  11. High Country Herb

    High Country Herb Adventure Connoiseur

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    Yup. As long as the value of my bike is high, I keep full coverage insurance on it. You might even be able to be reimbursed for farkles if you keep the receipts. Once the value of my bike drops below about 2K, I just carry liability and assume the risk myself. I do what I can to reduce the risk of theft (some might say I'm a little overboard), but nothing is 100%.
    #31
  12. Paul124ac

    Paul124ac Long timer

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    I’d be real careful with those integral-lock cables @High Country Herb, I was at a Motorsport event camped in the pits and broke the bloody key off in the barrel, couldn’t get the scooter off and of course no way to get the Moho out once the track is closed (tunnel under the track, rig is 3.3m tall but tunnel is not!). Bloke saw me staring at the lock, came back with a hammer, one hit and the lock broke. He said common as cow shit to see those cable locks fail as they get full of road grime, he’s busted open many. I now have the hardened chain with a sleeve plus a very good quality hardened protected shackle Bi-Lock padlock that I keep lubed, clean and seal the key hole with a bit of blu-tac, I was shocked how bloody easily he defeated the lock, relieved that I could do a re-supply but shocked.
    #32
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  13. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

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    I lost the key to a cable lock and was going to be late to a White Rim ride in Canyonlands. I was able to silently chew through the cable in about 5 minutes with just a Leatherman tool. It would only keep the honest people honest.

    Subsequently for the rest of the week, I just parked my beat looking WR450 parked next to my friends brand new KTM 500 EXE. I figured they would take the nicer bike before mine.

    After all what good are friends, if you cannot properly use them. :jack
    #33
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  14. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    I agree, you can only do so much. If they really want it and you're not around, it's gone.

    In the end I guess you've just gotta weigh the hassle vs the risk, when it comes to securing your bike.

    Maybe I should open carry a nice shiny 44 magnum revolver in a chest holster lol.
    #34
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  15. Project84

    Project84 I can haz adventure?

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    I have a thick 1/2" cable lock I keep looped around the passenger peg mounts and a disc lock hidden elsewhere on the bike. When camping in sketchy spots or motels, I'll set the steering lock and then loop the cable lock around the frame, steering neck and front wheel. Disc lock goes on rear rotor or sprocket.
    #35
  16. A_Vasiliev

    A_Vasiliev Red, white and blue.

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    I use a beefy Abus chain and Abus lock that goes with it. The chain has a special link on one end that allows the rest of the chain to pass through it, so you can have a little more chain length available to go from a big pole or structural member to your bike.

    I parked my dirt bike next to my apartment complex for about a month. Cameras, fairly far from the downtown area. Sort of a suburb. One day I come out and the steering lock has been shattered, I find a broken wood chisel nearby, and someone tried to saw through the Abus lock and got nowhere. End result - bike now doesn't have an ignition switch, but at least it didn't get stolen.

    It's not worth it to me to risk my money in the hopes that people will be nice and not steal my stuff. I do not recommend cable locks because they can often be bitten through with even small, easily packable cutters or sawn through pretty quickly. Square or hex link hardened chains are the best defense against bolt cutters. If the thief has a lithium-ion battery powered angle grinder you're SOL. Maybe double up with an alarmed disc lock.

    Stay safe.
    #36
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  17. JRMAL

    JRMAL Long timer

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    AAA Platinum Insurance.
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  18. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    How does that secure a motorcycle?

    If my dirt bike were stolen off my camper (if I had a camper), it would quite possibly ruin a large part of the trip. Filing a claim to replace the bike at some point in the future can never fix this problem - unless the insurance is SO awesome they just drop off a replacement to you, right away - as if...!
    #38
  19. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    Yep. I have good insurance, but it's not like I can just go down to the nearest Husky dealer and buy a replacement. It's taken me months of work to research, purchase and install all the mods. Obviously a do over would happen a lot quicker, but I don't have the space or tools to tackle a task like that while on the road.

    In fact, the whole reason I bought the 701 (for the back of the MH) is expressly because it's pretty low maintenance vs my 500. 30 hour valve checks and 15 hour oil changes with no enclosed space to work on the bike. No thanks!
    #39
  20. B02S4

    B02S4 Aye

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    You beat me to it...cables & locks are to help keep honest people honest. Sure, use them, just dont obsess over it. That said, take reasonable precautions that you will consistently use; unless you are at elevated risk, most times that is going to be sufficient. And have a 2nd key. :D
    #40
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