Securing a motorcycle left outside?

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by Colorad0, Aug 28, 2019.

  1. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Long timer

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    I found the key after the ride...in the bottom of the beer cooler. I do have a second key to the bike. Now I have a combination lock for the bike. No key to lose.
    Every time I try to make my stuff idiot proof... I seem to become a better idiot. :dirtdog
    #41
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  2. whisperquiet

    whisperquiet Motorcyclist Supporter

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    #42
  3. A_Vasiliev

    A_Vasiliev Red, white and blue.

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    Combination locks, unless they're quite high end, are usually very easy to crack. A lot of the time, faster than doing the steps necessary to hotwire the bike. You can do it with a strip of beer can in a lot of cases.
    #43
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  4. Snowbird

    Snowbird Cereal Killer

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    I'm not sure where you plan to park your motor home that is patrolled by thieves. Also, not sure how many thieves are out there looking for obscure Euro brand motorcycles. If the bike really is that desirable, leave it home locked in a locked garage, internet connected cameras and an armed guard. It's a freeking motorcycle that you bought for entertainment until such time as you use it up and replace it with something better. Heck, I leave a KLR unprotected, use a $30 XXL cover only to keep the sun and rain off when it sits in the campground. It's more likely to be hit from behind while traveling than stolen, or being stolen from where you've parked it while using it than from within a CG. I can see your concern, tho, if you camp in inner-city WalMarts.
    #44
  5. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    I don't know about you, but life on the road isn't always predictable. Weather, breakdowns, health etc can have you pulling over somewhere you'd prefer not to.

    I'd consider my 701 more therapy than entertainment. And as previously noted, it's not something that is easily replaced. Trust me when i say, you'd not want to be around me for a month or more if my bike got lifted mid trip. I'd be freaking livid. Major adrenaline withdrawal.
    #45
  6. Dtx915

    Dtx915 Been here awhile

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    So a few of our friends went to a race. The guy at the motel said to park the trailers with the doors to a pole so they cannot be opened and they were under the camera. They all were stolen as the clerk was in on the theft. No bikes recovered.
    A friend of mine returning from a race with his bike in the bed of a truck stopped by dunkins to grab a coffee. Walk in then walk out and the bike was gone, they cut soft straps and cable lock in a open parking lot in the day time.
    Get the motorcycle out of sight in a trailer and stay out of the city.
    #46
  7. Snowbird

    Snowbird Cereal Killer

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    Then leave it home and take along a bike that is replaceable. OTOH, everything is replaceable excepting people and pets. Possessing an object of such personal esteem is a case where the object possesses you. I can understand your point to a degree, but seriously, get a grip. It's only a motorcycle. In any case, have fun on your travels. Do you post regularly on your plans? If yes, then you are telegraphing your vulnerability. So don't do that.
    #47
  8. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    It has nothing to do with esteem, and everything to do with fit and performance.

    If you want a dual sport bike with the performance of a (heavy) race bike, then you better get busy in the garage. I'm still in my 40's and can ride our local trails at an A pace.

    Putting around on a easily replaceable, off the showroom floor, dual sport is not my idea of riding. Even a "ready to race" bike needs a steering damper, lo-boy pegs, wrap around handguards, tubless, folding mirrors, skidplate, real knobbies, new seat, new ecu + removal of various EPA crap. Then if you actually want to dual sport it, you'll need a bigger/aux gas tank and luggage. Of course there's often a suspension re-valve depending on your needs.

    I'm not knocking anyone who is satisfied with a stock KLR or DR etc. Hell, I wish I could be satisfied so easily. That would make life simple, and when you're on the road, simple is good.

    I really wanted to take a 500, but the 15 hour oil change and 30 hour valve checks would be a nightmare when traveling. Hence the 701 - make life a bit simpler.
    #48
  9. Schmokel

    Schmokel Key to Happiness: Low Expectations

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    Key to Happiness: Low Expectations
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  10. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    I always thought the key to happiness fits the ignition of a high performance motorcycle. :lol3
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  11. Schmokel

    Schmokel Key to Happiness: Low Expectations

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    Only if the high performance motorcycle has a charged battery and a tire that holds air.
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  12. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    The true pessimist/realist (low expectations) would be equipped with a tire plug kit, air compressor, jumper cables and micro battery.
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  13. Schmokel

    Schmokel Key to Happiness: Low Expectations

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    Oh, I've got you covered. Two spare tubes, compressor, tire changing tools, crutch bike stand, jumper cables, 5,000 zipties (not kidding), two rolls of Gorilla tape, sockets, wrenches, webbing, buckles, screws, JB Weld, shrink tubing, wiring, spark plugs, Leatherman, electrical connectors, toilet paper, quart of oil, waters, protein bars, and Deet spray on my DR at all times.

    :D
    #53
  14. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    I see you don't just talk, the talk. :nod
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  15. Snowbird

    Snowbird Cereal Killer

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    Jesus Christ. Why don't you just have your adoring fans watch it for you? Or call the cops to stake it out?

    Tells me otherwise.
    #55
  16. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    Not sure what's got your nickers in a knot mate. I'm just trying to get through to you why I don't want to ride an "off the showroom floor" bike. No need for you to be rude.
    #56
  17. Snowbird

    Snowbird Cereal Killer

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    There may not be any level of bike security that will satisfy you. But, good luck.
    #57
  18. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    Not sure what brings you to that conclusion. On the advice I received here, I've ordered an ABUS disc lock, Schlage noose security chain and a bike cover. Still debating on some sort of alarm. Not that I intend to use all these items all the time.

    Nothing wrong with the other suggestions/advice, including yours, but in the end, I need to decide what's going to work for my particular situation.
    #58
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  19. msjesscat

    msjesscat Adventurer

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    A decent quality disc lock with alarm, and a super heavy duty chain. If you're riding remote, that chain is a no-go and you probably don't need to worry so much, depending on the number of local hillbillies. You could always tie a string from your bike to your foot if you're in a tent. Or you could just get at tent LIKE THIS ONE - cosy! :-)
    #59
  20. Colorad0

    Colorad0 Been here awhile

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    That is a pretty cool tent, though no doubt bulky and heavy.

    As a Kiwi, I'm sure you can relate... the very though of tying a sting round said appendages would give me nightmares about the Toecutter :eyes

    #60
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