Servicing the LC4 chassis swingarm suspension link

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by creeper, May 17, 2005.

  1. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    You need to make a press to remove the bearings. Length of tube (or large socket) with od sufficient to rest against housing and id large enough to accept removed bearing, piece of flat metal, length of threaded rod, socket for other end with od sufficient to enter bore and press bearing out, couple of nuts. Simple stuff. Similar (minus tube) to press the new ones in.

    Heat doesn't much help for this. Seals are going to be trashed when you extract them so thats not an issue.
    #61
  2. Mulga

    Mulga Been here awhile

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    Is it possible to serivce the bearings without pressing them out. Flushing out the old grease with WD40 wiping dry and then re-greasing?
    #62
  3. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    Which ones are you talking about? the dog bone needle bearings are exposed and creeper has covered the method for dealing with the shock linkage and swingarm bearings... I feel like I'm missing something :scratch
    #63
  4. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    It depends on which bearing. Can I ask if you have read this thread?

    The Prolink is tough, if there is significant play in the bearing it should be replaced, given the questions you're asking, if your prolink is bad you might want to pay to have it replaced.

    For the other bearings, if they are in good shape, there is no need to replace them. Flush the old grease with a solvent kerosene (etc) and regrease. Meat's linkage bearings pictured, need to be replaced IMO.
    #64
  5. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    I added a link to my last post on that, pointing to similar advice from creeper I found after you got me looking. Thanks for the bucket o' water crazybrit :beer

    Mulga, I did find a thread on this business of re-greasing sealed bearings, but I have not been given permission to unearth it yet.
    #65
  6. potatoho

    potatoho Cheese and Rice!

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    #66
  7. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    No zerk?

    [​IMG]
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  8. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    For $30 I'm guessing it's just a ProLink alternative not the entire linkage assembly. The webpage doesn't do a good job of explaining this, they could have been a lot clearer IMHO. Maybe someone who's bought one will step forward.
    #68
  9. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    Sounds like one bushing? :dunno A complete KTM linkage assembly goes for between $150 and $200 as I recall.
    #69
  10. potatoho

    potatoho Cheese and Rice!

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    Yes it's just a plastic bushing to replace the heim bearing. We use them on the linkless KTM rears because it lasts a while and is easy/cheap to replace. Not sure how it works on the LC4 but I thought it interesting that they make one. Like you say its cheap enough and enough of a pain that just buying the whole OEM kit is a good way to go.

    Yup. Looks like a good deal. 58303080244 is listed at $204.52 today.
    #70
  11. Nico

    Nico The Sexiest of Silverbacks.

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    Better yet, I checked using the "Shop Online" button through KTMtalk.com, and Munn Racing has the complete assembly listed at $160.97, with the 15% discount for being a KTMtalk member.
    #71
  12. motomaj

    motomaj n00b

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    creeper...i ahve a renazco seat that came with the bike ...and.....it's too tall and wide. can fix? thanks the maj:clap
    #72
  13. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    The biggest problem I had getting grease into the linkage was finding a bearing shop. I guess many have combined with automotive repair shops (diversify?). Anyways there was one a few blocks from my house, went over with the linkage, he shot if with his hand gun (maybe 10 strokes) and it started oozing out. No charge. He wouldn't use his power gun; said it would blow the bearing right out of the linkage! :lol3

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=310809&page=3

    So maybe the assembled linkage interferes with the zerk or my stars were aligned. The fella said my swingarm bearings are fine; summary:

    one is very loose - fine
    the loose one shifts laterally a tad - once pressed it won't
    one is very tight - as long as its not frozen its fine

    there is no gritty feel/sound to either so I guess they are good. Sorry Creeper, no bearing disassembly for me :D
    #73
  14. sherpa

    sherpa ...Robert

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    Unfortunately, my "dog bone" bearings and shaft look many degrees worse than Meat's and will have to be replaced. Having trouble removing the bearings and need some guidance. So far I've been attempting to remove the left side bearing with a long drift through the frame hole in the right side....no luck. I've tried copious amounts of penetrating oil, heating the housing with a heat gun, and a bigger hammer :D .....nada.

    I have no idea of how to go about removing the right side bearing...the frame hole in the left side is too small for a worthy size drift. :dunno

    Help please....Meat how'd you remove yours. :ear

    I am definitely going to install a grease zerk in these puppies....I don't run a center stand so there is plenty of room for a right angled zerk which will be accessable from underneath.

    The only other thing of note so far is that my Prolink zerk accepts grease and has been serviced fairly regularly with just a hand grease gun...hopefully that's good karma for what I'm going to find inside. :evil

    Back to the shop.....thanks for the help.
    #74
  15. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    I was lucky and didn't have to replace mine but I've done similar.

    Get a piece of pipe. Plastic PVC plumbing is fine with a ID large enough to hold the driven out bearing but an OD which will rest against the housing.

    Then get some thick washers, or small pieces of pressed steel (and drill holes in them). Length of threaded rod and a socket which the threaded rod will fit thu the center of. Two nuts.

    You basically tighten the nut causing the socket to press the bearings out into the length of PVC pipe.

    CAUTION: this of course assumes that the channel thru the frame housing is a constant diameter. If theres a wider part in the middle between the two bearings, you're screwed and don't do it this way. Check first.

    Not sure how well this will work, maybe. You'll end up filling the center part of the housing with a lot of grease.
    #75
  16. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    Heya sherp,

    I was told don't worry about how you get them out, just drive them out. Pressing in the new ones is the finesse job, which I have some tips for you when you are ready (they are being compiled in my maintenance thread too).

    There is no "divider" in the housing so I simply drove them both out the port side by using a variety of implements and the bigger frame hole you referred to above. I sprayed some WD-40 liberally in there the day before but it sounds like you already have some penetrators at work. I didn't need any heat, just a heavy hand with a normal hammer.

    A grease zerk would probably work but it is easy enough to service if you remove the linkage arms and slide out the shaft. The seals are not "pressed" into place with any force; they wouldn't hold up to that anyways. These bearings probably need to be serviced more often than every year (the linkage's spec) depending on the amount of inclement weather and/or water crossings.
    #76
  17. sherpa

    sherpa ...Robert

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    This is the little bit of info. I needed. :thumb

    I assumed the bearing was positioned against a shoulder necessitating it being "pulled" out verses driven all the way through.

    I now understand the finesse reference too....you've got to set the depth of the bearing relative to the end....So when you get a chance can you tell me your trick there too Meat.... :bow

    crazybrit....thanks for your solution too :thumb ....it didn't make sense to me until knowing there was no shoulder...your's would of been a more elegant removal, but a hammer and a 17mm socket with extension got the job done. :D

    With everything apart the only other problem was the bushings in the Prolever bearing were stuck....I drove them out and will order new ones....the bearing itself seems as good as new.
    #77
  18. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    You can use a variant of same to install the new bearings. Same for the prolink. Beating on new bearing w/ hammer == not good.

    Yeah, how does Creeper term their install? Light press fit? Not mine, took some effort to get them out. I ordered new ones also (which required a lot more than a light press to install) but I think I could have cleaned up the drift damage on the old ones and reused. Having slightly less depth on the inner flange (from filing off damage) I don't think is an issue.
    #78
  19. meat popsicle

    meat popsicle Ignostic

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    I was assuming the housing was just wide enough to hold the bearings and seals - dang it, I could have checked this before pressing the bearings in - and the only trick was getting the two centered so there was enough room on either side for the seals. Maybe I'd better worry, but it seems silly to leave enough room in there for the bearings to migrate laterally (i.e. free space between the two properly installed bearings).

    Right now I have one bearing in far enough for that seal. The other is flush and I was waiting on some different hardware for pressing (the linkage arm's shaft is problematic for pressing in the bearings... ). I will be back at it tomorrow and will update my maintenance thread when I have something that worked. Should be soon.
    #79
  20. crazybrit

    crazybrit Long timer

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    I learnt long ago when replacing wheel bearings (where it turns out that on some wheels pressing them fully against the retaining wall of the bore set them in too far) that you should measure how far inset they are before removing them.
    #80