Setting suspension on a WR250R for lightweight

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Nikkipheonix, Mar 10, 2020.

  1. Nikkipheonix

    Nikkipheonix n00b

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    Hey inmates, new poster here.

    I just bought my first duelsport, a 2019 Wr250R yesterday with ~330 miles on it!

    I'm very excited as I've been a street rider for 3 years, and looking to get into some trail riding. Figured this would be a good bike to start with in that world, as I can get to the trail without a truck.

    Not sure how many miles it actually has, as the PO changed out the rear sprocket to a 46T. I might buy a spedohealer soon to fix that.

    Anyway, the real question I have for you guys is setting up the suspension for my weight. I've been looking around on multiple different forums and whatnot, but haven't really seen anything specific to my situation.

    The PO was 6'2 200lb+, and I am 6' and 135lb w/o gear if I eat a hearty breakfast. (Yeah, I know, I'm a twig with a crazy metabolic system.) The PO set his suspension very hard, and when he got on the bike it sagged down a respectable amount. As for me, I don't know if it dropped an inch when I plopped on.

    I've seen videos on how to change all the different suspension settings on the WR250R, but am lacking in my knowledge of how my weight should affect the settings of these.

    I assume I should want to set the rebound damping to its minimum (softest) settings, but do I need to adjust the spring preload, and/or compression damping as well to adjust for my skinny butt?

    Another thing I am unsure about is that the manual talks about "clicks" for max and min settings. Since the PO adjusted these for some extreme settings, I am not sure how to tell what the factory settings would be on it. For example, manual states 25 clicks to the left for the minimum, but what am I measuring that from?

    Last question I have today is did the PO's suspension settings affect the seat height?
    I know it's a tall bike, but I can barely get my toes on the ground. That's not a dealbreaker for me as I'm agile, and shift one cheek off the seat at stoplights, but I have no traction for me to back up the bike without getting off.

    Anyways yeah main question I have is since I'm so light, should I be adjusting everything to its softest settings?

    Thanks to anyone for their help :)
    #1
  2. Navin

    Navin Long timer

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    Look up race sag, see if its got a stock spring on the back and then adjust or replace as necessary. Then ride it. Adjust. Ride. Adjust. Ride. See a pattern? :deal
    #2
  3. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Stock springs are for 175-200 lbs
    #3
  4. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Probably all stock.

    Reduce sag then adjusters.
    #4
  5. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    Good advice above, all the normal basic advice about dirt bike suspension setup applies to the WRR so look up a tutorial. Chances are there's lots of preload on the rear spring.

    One thing the WRR has that many don't is an adjustable rear shock length - the lower clevis on the shock can be adjusted up with a spanner to lower the rear suspension. Then you can slide the forks up through their clamps to lower the front a little, not too much though, be aware of suspension travel vs front mudguard, you don't want to bottom out on that. At 6' you shouldn't really need to lower it once the sag is set right but a low seat can be nice when learning offroad.

    Cheers
    Clint
    #5
  6. JensEskildsen

    JensEskildsen Long timer

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    Turn the knob for the rebound on the shock all the way in, and back it of a click or two.
    Theres online spring calculators, you seem on the egde of needing lighter springs, but you might just get by when you've added up riding gear ect.
    #6
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  7. eakins

    eakins Butler Maps

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    Yes you want max rebound set on the shock & even then it sucks.
    #7
  8. Nikkipheonix

    Nikkipheonix n00b

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    Thanks to everyone for all the awesome responses so far!

    I woke up early yesterday to get started on adjusting my spring preload, but almost threw out my back trying to get the bike up on an mx stand.
    Went around to a few different shops in town looking for a better stand, but got distracted looking at this new world of offroad gear.

    Anyway, I got a better stand, and am about to lower the spring preload. After working with that for a bit, I may also wind up doing the factory lowering option, but only if I really feel I still need it, as I've heard it affects handling.

    Also yes, the spring is stock. I entered in my stats on the Race Tech Online Calculator, and it suggested 4.3-4.5kg on the fork springs, and 7.93kg on the rear.

    I think I'll set the stock as well as I can for now (throw some weights in a tank bag maybe :p) and after getting my feet wet offroad, see if I should switch out to a lighter spring. The front springs are already 4.6 stock, which I feel might be close enough to not mess with for now.

    I'll follow up after riding around for a bit to see how it handles.
    #8
  9. NC Rick

    NC Rick Cogent Dynamics Inc

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    Make sure the rear suspension sags by 1-1.3" under the bikes own weight. This is accomplished by adjusting the spring preload collars. The shock is open bleed, I recommend setting to the factory specs to start. You have a low-mile newer bike which is less likely to have become emulsified by air yet.
    #9
  10. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    I think you'll be good with it in stock form. Get the sag dialed in and post your race and free sag numbers, that'll tell the story regarding the rear spring rate. Start out with the clickers in stock settings and adjust from there as needed.
    #10
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