Sherco rear suspension lubrication

Discussion in 'Trials' started by Cascao, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. Cascao

    Cascao Adventurer

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  2. Bronco638

    Bronco638 Nobody Home

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    This is awesome, thanks. Should the dog bone bushings be installed dry? Or would a smear of water-proof grease help with installation?

    To those of you with Shercos and are contemplating doing this: I cannot stress enough that you lubricate the swing arm bolt (as shown in the video) on (at least) a yearly basis. It does not come lubricated (very well) from the Factory. That bolt runs thru the case and frame and can seize in either/both. DAMHIK. Once seized, removing it is a b!tch. If you want to know what you might be in for, if it is seized, Google "dreaded swing arm bolt" and a bunch of XR250R and XR400R threads will pop up. One guy had to cut his swing arm apart to resolve the issue. I didn't have to resort to that when I had my '14 ST300 but it did require an impact driver to get that bolt out. As you can imagine, that bolt was not re-usable (it's aluminum). An ounce of prevention.....
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  3. Cascao

    Cascao Adventurer

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    The recomended is to apply some lubrificant when installing the bushing. But it goes easly anyway. These buschings are very cheap on industrial suppliers.
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  4. motobene

    motobene Motoing for 46 years

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    Cascao you always do great videos!

    It's easy to regrease the dogbone bushings on Sherco-Scorpa bikes. I do that about twice a season and if I go a bit long I squirt oil on them.

    I remove the dogbones to clean and re grease the bushings. It's pretty easy to get them off. You don't have to remove the swing arm.

    The swing arm pivot and rocker arm needle bearings are quite robust and well sealed. Once you fully pack them the maintenance interval is much longer than the dogbone bushings. You can often go a few years without damage.

    If you are totally lazy at least oil the moving interfaces, especially on the dogbone ends. If you get the creaking noise when you sit on the bike you are wearing out the bushings much faster.

    If you keep the dogbone bushings greased reasonably well you can expect infinite life out of them. I find them to be touger than needle bearing-type dogbones, but because they are not sealed except by grease, the grease will migrate out faster than on sealed systems.

    I've tried sealing them with o-rings but found that it's simpler to just clean and grease them every now and then.
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  5. tomatoe333

    tomatoe333 Long timer

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    My 2016 Sherco feels like it has a little bit of play in all of those bushings in the dogbones. I'll be taking it apart this weekend for an inspection and lube. Hoping it's not too late for them... :uhoh
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  6. Cascao

    Cascao Adventurer

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    Buy them first. They are sheap and you will not loose your job. In video there the code. PG....
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  7. Beatprojim

    Beatprojim Beatprojim

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    Get used to the slop. They do sell a replacement "Bearing Friction" - as it is called in the parts manual that seems to do little when replaced. I noticed that a good bit of the slop comes from 2 places. The tabs that connect to the frame to hold the dogbone have holes for the bolts that have slack. Not sure if that dimension can be tightened up in anyway. (Slightly over-sized bolt if they make such a thing?) And then the link spacer in the dogbone has an 8mm hole in it for the bolt and it too is loose. I did have a friend machine some new spacers with a 7.90mm hole. Now the bolt has very little play and tightens the back end up a bit. Otherwise a re-greasing will make things feel pretty good - for a few hours.
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  8. tomatoe333

    tomatoe333 Long timer

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    Well, I got the dogbones off and apart. One of them was siezed in the hole pretty badly, and I had to press it out with a couple of sockets and my bench vise. Cleaned them out and reassembled with 80% moly grease, which is my lube of choice on suspension bushings - really anything where there's a lot of force and not a large range of motion. I couldn't break free the lower bolt on the shock. I'll tackle that when the season is over and I can disassemble the whole rear end of the bike.

    Suspension is rebounding noticeably quicker, and seems more compliant, especially at the top of the stroke. Definitely an improvement, and I'll keep those bushings lubed up better.

    Noticed that the rear wheel bearings were shot when I was reassembling things. Took me all of 15 minutes to change those out. Practice makes perfect, apparently...
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