Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. xNOKIAx

    xNOKIAx Been here awhile

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    you can see it on last pic. compares forks next each other

    i do not have build thread now. maybe i will do it. i just did some modification till now. you can find it here some pages back. but this will be winter project. it will take some time. i still not have lights for example and want rebuild engine as well (bad compression :( ) i need make front rack for lights and fearing as well. i will leave rear side with original swing arm. just rebuild rear shock.
  2. Peter M DK

    Peter M DK Adventurer

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    greybear and MrKiwi like this.
  3. xNOKIAx

    xNOKIAx Been here awhile

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    looks good!!! :evil

    which lights is it?
  4. Peter M DK

    Peter M DK Adventurer

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  5. xNOKIAx

    xNOKIAx Been here awhile

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  6. Son of MotoPolo

    Son of MotoPolo The mountains are calling...

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    @Peter M DK - sorry for stealing part of your pic, but the KTM fender exposed the very part I was hoping to ask my questions about. :-)

    What's everyone's opinion on the necessity of the fork brace (circled in the pic below). It doesn't seem to offer much structural value, I can bend it fairly easily by hand. Would it be dangerous to run without it? If I go with the high fender, I'd love to keep that top-of-the-tire area clean and clear.

    upload_2018-12-10_22-11-1.png
  7. plumer1kt

    plumer1kt Adventurer

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    I was riding my bike without the brace for 8 years.
    Limits caused by the acerbis fender and the T63 ( Aerodynamics and the softer carcass of the tire ) made me remove the brace without notice any difference.I did test with and without the brace.
    Never had stability issues.It was the same with or without the brace.
    Probably the brace is a must with the low fender and street tires.
    Something i noticed : fork stiction was less without the brace

    Μ (188).JPG
  8. Son of MotoPolo

    Son of MotoPolo The mountains are calling...

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    "Something i noticed : fork stiction was less without the brace"

    This is curious...any idea why? Maybe it was pulling slightly in on the forks, making them move just slightly out of straight?
  9. plumer1kt

    plumer1kt Adventurer

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    Fork alignment.
    Beside good seals and bushes, fork tubes need to be parallel if you want minimum stiction.
    Maybe with the off-road use, tubes and clamps bent slightly ,add here that seals/bushes worn too, and the brace may interfere to the alignment procedure as it keeps the fork sliders in a fixed position.
    Years later i found an article of a suspension specialist for older japanese bikes who wrote that 4 at 5 times the brace was responsible for bad stiction results.(i'll try find that article and post it).
    Even if the bikes was for street use,hard braking can bend forks and lead to misalignment.
    Now you know why the latest off-road forks have larger OD, bigger triple clamps and can slide to the wheel axle at both sides!
    images.jpeg
    EDIT:i forgot that wheel axle bends too
  10. Son of MotoPolo

    Son of MotoPolo The mountains are calling...

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    Good info. I'd be curious to read that article if you manage to dig it up.
  11. Peter M DK

    Peter M DK Adventurer

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    Nice to know. My frontfork actually acts a bit strange sometimes at low speed braking. Maybe it's better without that fork brace.
  12. Peter M DK

    Peter M DK Adventurer

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    Another TransAlp question:
    I have a XL600V TransAlp tank on my Africa twin. It has approximately 12L to reserve, and around 2L later I runs out.

    But the tank is specified to 18L.

    What is the true tanksize? Where is the rest?
  13. MotoLodiek

    MotoLodiek Adventurer

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    Are you sure about the amount of liters used? Measured or based off of the expected fuel economy?

    18L sounds about right for the total capacity, not sure about the crossover to the reserve tho, seems to be all over the place for me.
  14. Peter M DK

    Peter M DK Adventurer

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    It is measured. I can fill in 12 / 14 liter at reserve and at "dry" (running part time).
  15. MotoLodiek

    MotoLodiek Adventurer

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    mm, all I know is that when the tank looks full I'm able to squeeze in another litre or so. (in the air pocket around the filler cap)

    Now I'm curious as well! I'll see what I can measure myself and keep you updated.
  16. plumer1kt

    plumer1kt Adventurer

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    If the tank has this metallic ring beneath the cap,there is an air expansion chamber that cost around 10% of the total volume.[​IMG]
    650/700 has that chamber,don't know if your tank is from the latest italian models with the TPS and that tank has that chamber too.
    My 650 can't get more than 17-17.5 lt's of fuel and HONDA states 19.6 lt's of capacity.
    Something else i noticed , you wrote that only 2 lt's of fuel remain when you switch to reserve .
    The reserved capacity should be at around 3-3.5 lt's.
    That said, check your fuel tap [​IMG] for damage or dirt in the lower part, maybe 1,5 -2 lt's stay always inside the tank.
    Check your tank for fuel "mud" (what's the word for that?),the white/brown stuff that looks like wet salt.
    If the tank was left for long period with fuel inside for sure you have that "mud" at the bottom that limit your capacity.
    European unleaded fuel do convert in "mud"
  17. xNOKIAx

    xNOKIAx Been here awhile

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  18. MrKiwi

    MrKiwi Long timer Super Supporter

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    that is strange, as I imported to NZ from the Netherlands a 1998 XL600V and the tank size is 18.5L. I just assumed that was the standard size for the 600c Transalp?
  19. plumer1kt

    plumer1kt Adventurer

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    Can't find it,but i have in a word document a piece of that article.Not sure if this is the one i told you but he's saying the same ,more or less.

    """" ALIGNMENT TUNING Assemble the fork, leaving out the oil and springs, wheel and
    fender. Lightly snug the triple clamps. Bolt in the axle, tightening it in its clamps without the wheel. Pay
    close attention to the axle clamps (on Hondas, those arrows go forward - tighten the front nuts first),
    using normal torque. Now raise this axle /slider assembly all the way to the top of its travel and let it
    go. Does it drop to the bottom of its travel unaided? If it doesn't budge, you've got some serious
    binding somewhere. If it's just a little slow to drop, remove the axle, loosen one of the damper rod's
    allen bolts (either one), turn the slider 90 degrees, retighten the bolt, replace the axle and try the drop
    test again. Repeat as necessary, tuning one or both damper rods, until you achieve maximum "drop
    speed." Take your time. Next, tap the top of one of the fork tubes with a soft mallet to move the tube
    downward in its clamps a smidge (0.010"-0.020") and try the drop test again. If there's no change, tap
    some more. If still no change, raise the slider/axle assembly all the way to the top of its travel and tap
    on the bottom of the leg upward, which will move the tube upward in its clamp, and check with the drop
    test again. Try tapping the other leg also.
    Do you see what we're doing? We're hunting for the best alignment. Because of manufacturing
    tolerances, the best internal alignment may very well occur when one of the fork tubes is incrementally
    higher than the other. Say 0.050"-0.080". That's okay. It's far more important to align the fork's parts
    internally, than it is to worry about what they look like on the outside. Just remember to fully tighten the
    triple clamp bolts when finished. At this point, try the front fender. Install it and do the drop test. Don't
    let the fender influence fork movement. Reshape its inner bracket, shim between the fender and the
    sliders--whatever it takes to get the same drop speed with and without the fender.

    Stiction tuning makes a world of difference. Be sure to do all of the steps in order. There's one more goal
    in stiction tuning. If you want some heartache, or rather what I call a reality check, at this point install your
    fork brace, if you have one, and check the drop test with it added to the mix. Very disappointing, isn't it?
    I
    Have never found a fork brace, even the factory's, that did not muck up all my hard work, and the
    aftermarket ones are far worse than the factory's. For this one reason, I am not a fan of aftermarket fork
    braces.
    If you race your bike, I understand how you feel about that part, but I still do not recommend
    them, except for possibly the old horseshoe-shaped bolt-to-the-fender-boss ones I think came out of CC
    Products. They're made right and can be tuned, neither of which is true of the clamp-on type. For what it's
    worth. """
  20. Son of MotoPolo

    Son of MotoPolo The mountains are calling...

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    Well, the forks are already back on the bike, with oil, springs, Intminators, and fork caps alrwady installed, so maybe this waits til next time. Good info tho..I think I'll leave the brace off for now and assess as I go.