Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. Skyliner

    Skyliner Adventurer Super Supporter Supporter

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    And don't forget about keeping the TA disc aligned with the XRL caliper.
    2old2Bbold likes this.
  2. Santa

    Santa Focused on the Future

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    Hello
    I have 06 crf250 Showa forks I plan to lower to get back to stock height so I do not need stock forks.
    Sorry I did not see this, busy having left hip replacement due to bone cancer .
    That has put all else on hold as sadly my riding days may be over
    stratos34 likes this.
  3. tag3

    tag3 Doofus

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    Inland from the coast of Santa Cruz and Trona.
    Aw dude. Was wondering why you weren't at Mongos little Fiesta.
    Heal up man!!
    stratos34 likes this.
  4. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Sorry to hear that. Don't give up yet. Got a buddy still riding with a hip replacement.

    Here he is on top of Cinnamon Pass CO...on the right.
    [​IMG]
  5. Santa

    Santa Focused on the Future

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    Thanks guys
    We’ll see how this goes
    Really wanted fiesta
  6. tag3

    tag3 Doofus

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    Be glad you missed the cookies........campfire story.......heehee.
  7. Santa

    Santa Focused on the Future

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    Yes, so I have been told :choppa
  8. Geo-Nemesis

    Geo-Nemesis Adventurer

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    what is the jibber spring?

    and about the deaville / shadow clutch pack: i just get a complete one and swap it with stock one?
    when I abuse the clutch offroad in places not meant for the transalp my clutch starts "expanding" (don't know if it's the correct term)
    thanks
  9. tag3

    tag3 Doofus

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    The kind of half friction that is beveled.
    #5 and #11 ExtraLarge.png
    CDA441 and Geo-Nemesis like this.
  10. Skyliner

    Skyliner Adventurer Super Supporter Supporter

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    #11 is the Judder Spring and it fits inside the #7 friction plate. It's suppose to keep a little pressure on the plates when the clutch is disengaged and keeps them from rattling. Remove the Judder spring and plate #7 and replace it with a #6 plate.

    The NT650 and VT750 clutch packs uses thinner fiber and metal plates so that when you compare the NT650 and VT750 7 plate stacks, they are the same thickness as the Transalp 600 6 plate stack. You can't interchange 600 and 650/750 plates. Use all of one kind or the other.
  11. Son of MotoPolo

    Son of MotoPolo The mountains are calling...

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    Hey all, anyone know the size and pitch for the threads at the bottom of the stock shock? I'm going the @Santa route and inserting a spacer to compensate for added length of the XR forks, at least until my wallet allows me to splurge on some fancy aftermarket shock. I'd love to know the size before I remove the linkage from the rear end.
    upload_2020-8-18_22-22-53.png
  12. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Search Locorider posts.

    He did his with a lug nut from a Toyota. Effective and cheap
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  13. Fliegenfischer

    Fliegenfischer Adventurer

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    14 x 1,25 mm
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  14. DualDog

    DualDog Been here awhile

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    It's been awhile since I read up on the front sprocket and the issue of wear on the splines on the countershaft. I happened to come upon the Superpinion (from kkbikeinternational) front counter sprocket made in Italy thats suppose to solve the issue of wear on the splines and shaft. I am just curious if anybody has tried one of these on their Transalp and their opinion to prevent the wear on this shaft. I'm just trying to avoid future problems and issues down the road.
  15. Skyliner

    Skyliner Adventurer Super Supporter Supporter

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    That looks really interesting. I just picked up a used TA (#4) that has 60k miles on it, but the countershaft looks almost perfect. I might get one on these Sprockets just to keep it that way.
  16. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Here’s the bullet points on the CS spocket and output shaft splines

    Based on over 160,000 miles between my and my son’s TA.

    - Use OEM Honda CS sprockets
    - Clean output shaft splines after every CS sprocket change (or after any extended sandy/dusty off road ride) and lightly lube with Honda Moly 60 paste
    - Keep chain tension at the “loose” end of the specifications in the manual (45mm or about 1 3/4 in)
    - Modify chain tension accordingly if using a longer shock, AT swing arm or other rear suspension mods
    - Maintain your rear hub Cush drive
  17. Fiftyfatponies

    Fiftyfatponies Been here awhile

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    How do you measure the chain tension? Completely unloaded like on a center stand?
  18. DualDog

    DualDog Been here awhile

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    Ladder 106 mentions Honda Moly 60 paste. My local Honda dealer says this has been discontinued and they are now using a marine bearing grease or something similar. Just curious if you know where the Honda stuff can be found.
  19. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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  20. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

    Joined:
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    Measure on bottom chain run. Suspension at full droop. Midway between sprockets.

    Moly 60 is not a firm requirement....just something I like to use. Sad you can’t get it anymore works great for BMW splines and the splines on my ST1100.

    You’ll notice that even with the CS sprocket bolted up, it still moves slightly on the output shaft. I like having that movement supported by some type of lubricant and moly works well in those high load areas with almost no movement between the parts. Mainly you just don’t want rust and grit to develop in that area and work like a grinding compound to wear away at the splines.

    Have a peek in there with a light and if you see red/rust....clean and re-lube.

    To find your perfect chain tension, remove the lower “U” shaped suspension link, put the bike up on a stand and then support the rear swing arm with a jack or other apparatus (you want the rear wheel to be able to spin). Then use a simple string line to move the swing arm up (compressing the suspension) until the center-ines of the output shaft, swing arm pivot and rear axle are all in a straight line. This is the area of maximum chain tightness in the arc of the rear suspension movement.

    Set your chain there for the minimum amount of slack that will also give the chain a smooth run as your spin the rear wheel.

    Doing this I’ve found the 40-45 mm number when measured at full droop to be most accurate.

    You also should be doing this and aligning the rear wheel at the same time. The factory alignment marks are fairly accurate but can be off by half-a-mark or so if done with string lines. There are manufacturing tolerances and wear that affect that system.

    I also mention the rear Cush drive. This area is usually overlooked but if kept in good shape will help to reduce impact loads on the chain and output shaft.
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