Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    If you are just trying to improve braking, make those improvements to the front brake with a larger diameter disc from the ST1100 Pan European and a brake adapter. The rear drum brake is plenty strong enough to lock the rear end if doing brake turns off-road and strong enough to stop the rear when both brakes are used correctly on the street.

    The only reason for using the rear disc is if you are trying to increase rear suspension travel with an RD03/04 swingarm and longer rear shock etc. Then the rear disc gives you the flexibility to accomplish this without the restriction of the solid brake rod operating the drum brake that gets geometrically confused when the rear travel increases.

    It’s a lot of expense and trouble for no real increase in braking performance.
    nomiles and WayneJ like this.
  2. Leaper42

    Leaper42 n00b

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    Thanks for the tip, this seems to be the best option so far.

    I too wouldn't mind some extra stopping power ('96 with a single front disc). Is there an alternative to the Steve Lenac brake adapter, which if I understood correctly is no longer available?
  3. rotorhead511

    rotorhead511 Live and let live.

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    Green Bank, NJ

    What are your thoughts on Stainless brake line?

    Also, my rear makes a lot of noise when braking. Even with new pads. Any recommendations?
  4. Clem Kevin

    Clem Kevin Nude With Boots

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    On this topic, it's been on my mind, I have something to throw in too. I'm running CR250 forks with a CRF450x caliper. I'm just concerned that little caliper will overheat quickly, but I cannot find any alternatives for a bigger caliper on the front end of those forks.
  5. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Lots of articles on setting up drum brakes. Mainly you’re looking for ways to minimize the vibrations that cause the noise.

    The brake shoes are cast and sometimes have high spots on the rounded part or even on the flat part that does not allow the shoes to sit correctly on the pin. Those spots can be cleaned up with very careful filing to make certain everything sits square.

    Also try setting up the brake by spinning the rear wheel with the axle nut loosened......as the wheel is spinning apply the rear brake and HOLD it on while the rear axle is tightened and torqued. Easier with 2 people.

    Because the backing plate is not bolted to a stay but only slotted into the tab on the swing arm, vibration might be occurring at that joint. Some experimenting with shimming to tighten this point may be valuable. I’ve not done this yet. The one bike I have with the drum will squeak on the first two applications when cold then settles down to be quiet for the rest of the ride.

    Stainless braided lines are almost never a bad idea. Our bikes are OLD and the flex hoses get tired.
    nomiles likes this.
  6. rotorhead511

    rotorhead511 Live and let live.

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    Thanks Ladder. Is there a specific braided line to get or is getting one made the only way to go?
  7. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Some hydraulic repair shops are glad to make up small lines for a one-off job.....others can’t be bothered or get confused with the metric threaded fasteners. You may have to look around.

    Also consider that raw braided stainless line is very abrasive if it isn’t coated with plastic or covered with spiral-type wire wrapping. The fork action can have it filing away at gauges or other parts as you ride if it’s not protected.

    I’m not aware of any “kits” that currently exist for the TA. However, Jonathan at Rugged Roads in the UK has a kit that works for the RD03 (not the RD04 with dual discs) Africa twin. That MIGHT work. His line comes straight out of the master cylinder and the banjo fitting at the caliper end looks like it will work. The entire line might be a bit long for the TA since the RD03 has longer front legs.

    Make sure you have your riding position, handlebars, risers, etc dialed in first since this will affect the line length.
    rotorhead511 likes this.
  8. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    https://galferusa.com/product-category/honda/1990/street/xl-600-transalp
    rotorhead511 likes this.
  9. Santa

    Santa Focused on the Future

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    I’ll second the opinion that the drum rear brake is adequate for most situations when running a dual sport type tire.
    With a little optimization I find it has really good feel and will lock when needed which prompted me to just keep it.
    Obligatory pic.
    Sheetiron 300

    [​IMG]
    Fubars, nomiles, iamdorus and 2 others like this.
  10. Santa

    Santa Focused on the Future

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    What I would like are some decent radiator shrouds
    I have been using DRZ shrouds intending to do something better but did not move forward as I tend to cover them with tank panniers
    [​IMG]

    I’d like to work with someone to come up with something better for those of us who have non stock fairings on their Transalps
    Mostly seen Alu road signs cut down and gently folded to make a part.

    I’m seeking other ideas preferably in plastic

    Thanks for looking
    nomiles likes this.
  11. Skyliner

    Skyliner Adventurer Super Supporter Supporter

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    nomiles likes this.
  12. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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  13. Skyliner

    Skyliner Adventurer Super Supporter Supporter

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    Since you guys are all showing off your bikes I thought I should show you mine. 89 USA, 03 RD07 Swingarm and Caliper, 08 CRF450X Forks with custom wound springs, 2 sets of wheels for dirt (21/18) or street (19/17), 06 VT750 motor with High Compression Pistons and WebCams Camshafts, 91 NT650 heads and 90 NT650 36.5mm Carburetors Plus much more.

    20190803_121923.jpg KIMG0034.jpg
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  14. Skyliner

    Skyliner Adventurer Super Supporter Supporter

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    No, I'm having trouble getting the Throttle bodies to fit next to each other. I may need to come up with some intake
    extensions to move them farther apart. I have also seen where someone used the stock carburetors, removed the vacuum slide and machined an adapter to fit the injector in place or the slide. But then I need to find a pair of carbs with the throttle position sensor.

    That all is on a back burner right now while I'm working on a 802cc version of my 750 motor.
    nomiles and 2old2Bbold like this.
  15. Dirtpatch

    Dirtpatch Getmesome

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    east coast
    I’m traveling without my manual. 1989 transalp. What’s the proper amount of chain slack for adjusting the chain. Can someone send me that diagram that shows the adjustment..

    Also what is a good link to buy replacement fork rubber boots that are easy to replace
  16. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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  17. Santa

    Santa Focused on the Future

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    Thanks Skyliner and 2O2Bb for the leads on the shrouds.

    Really nice bike there Skyliner.
  18. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Skyliner.....

    Hands down, your have the “Most Modified Engine” award in any TA ......EVER

    Nice work.

    G,

    Those radiator guards would look great on your bike. I think the pointy bit would work well with the angle of the Britannia.
  19. Dirtpatch

    Dirtpatch Getmesome

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    Location:
    east coast
    I was traveling in Texas and noticed at the higher speeds this state has versus the Northeast my mileage dropped significantly. In the northeast at speeds of 55-60 the bike gets 47 mpg. Now that I’m doing 75 and the rpm is 6000 I dropped to 30 mpg. I was in Big bend national park where the speed was 55 and I measured my mileage and it was still 47 mpg. For some of these long stretches between gas stations in remote areas I wonder if I should go to a different front sprocket..

    I like the capability of the first gear speed for some technical work but if I’m mostly going on a road trip out west what size would be a good sprocket in the front to swap out without doing anything with chain length.

    I’m currently running stock gearing. Anyone that has done this let me know.
  20. Skyliner

    Skyliner Adventurer Super Supporter Supporter

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    Changing the gearing won't help your gas mileage much. It takes so much Horsepower to push your bike through the air and it takes so much fuel to make that Horsepower. There is an RPM range where your bike runs most efficient. If you can get that RPM then it will do better mileage wise, but don't expect any miracles.

    Upping the Countershaft sprocket to a 16t will make the bike more comfortable to ride on the Freeway and dropping it to a 14t will make more fun in the dirt.

    My 750 motor uses a larger Countershaft than the 600 motor and I have a 13t and a 17t for it. I tend to change my gearing a lot depending on what I'm going to do. I even have a 39t rear sprocket and when I know I'm going to be on the freeway for days at a time I put on the 17t/39t combo which is really nice at the end of the day. But even with that I don't notice much Mileage gain.