Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2011
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    5,305
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    Arlington, Texas
    A lot of Transalps will burn more oil at higher RPMs.
    Some motors that don't use any oil at RPMs below 5K will burn oil above 6K.
  2. Dirtpatch

    Dirtpatch Getmesome

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    Feb 7, 2008
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    Location:
    east coast
    Mine doesn’t burn any and it has 35000 on it.
    Dudley likes this.
  3. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Aerodynamic drag, is kinda a subset of fluid dynamics that involves really complex equations.

    But the basic generalities are: Drag increases as the square of speed.......double the speed = 4 times the aero drag. Next, the power to overcome that drag increases as the cube (power of 3) ......double the sped requires 8 times the power.

    Yeah - yeah.....so what.

    Well the what addresses Dirtpatches efficiency (MPG) problem. He says he’s traveling so I’m betting he’s got lots of gear hung off his bike in various ways.

    All of this is increasing his aero drag.

    Gearing won’t help since even though many guys have used a 16T countershaft sprocket on their TAs (which can be had OEM by ordering one from the NT 650 Hawk BTW). This gearing change will likely require even larger throttle openings too hold a high speed and may result in even lower MPG readings.

    The science gives you 2 options.

    Clean up your drag (rearrange bags, etc)

    Or

    Slow down. (Freeways are boring and a crappy way to travel and see the country and meet folks). Ban freeways from your trip, take the backroads. You’ll have more fun.


    Oh...and Dirtpatch.....check your oil, mate. You say your not accustomed to sustained higher speeds so you THINK the bike doesn’t use oil. After a thousand miles at 75 mph, I think you’ll be surprised.

    Don’t let it get too low.
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  4. Son of MotoPolo

    Son of MotoPolo The mountains are calling...

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Somewhere north of SF, and west of CO
    Anyone got a line on chain sliders? OEM stuff seems to be out of production...

    upload_2020-11-11_21-3-18.png
  5. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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  6. CDA441

    CDA441 Belgian

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    Dec 11, 2014
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    Location:
    West-Flanders, Belgium
    Got my chain sliders also from CMSNL
  7. Skyliner

    Skyliner Adventurer Super Supporter Supporter

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    Woodside California
  8. ravelv

    ravelv from Baltic side of river

    Joined:
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    Go for it. Most modern 90/90-21 tires are for 2.15 rim size in fact.
    And no any clearance issues should rise.

  9. Skyliner

    Skyliner Adventurer Super Supporter Supporter

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    That sounds like a great idea. I didn't even know it existed, but it looks as if the KTM 950/990 and Africa Twins use them. I think I'm going to try one on my bike. Buchanan sells a Sun Rim that size and they will drill it for you.
  10. Dirtpatch

    Dirtpatch Getmesome

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    I'm back from my trip and stored the transalp. Thanks for the help on the road with my questions. When I left Texas I drove in a cage back to Anderson South Carolina and interstated it back to Albany NY in two days with a 480 mile and a 420 mile day. At speeds of 75 on my 2015 1200 gsa with the same bags I averaged 39 mpg with my six speed fuel injected bike. It was extremely comfortable on the drive even though I hate doing interstates. (did them due to early darkness in fall)

    I do say that my transalp for being 31 years old is extremely capable, comfortable and a great bike to ride and would take it anywhere. The fact that it is lighter and lower to the ground seat height wise was a plus. I really enjoy it and if it was my only bike I would be happy. Honda made a great bike when they made the transalp.
    mas335, Honda-50 and Dudley like this.
  11. Ate

    Ate n00b

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2020
    Oddometer:
    3
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    XL650V, this is what i've done:
    second-hand K&N filter
    Exhaust from https://huzarexhaust.eu/
    Had 125 jets installed with the cat delete and huzar exhaust. But returned to the stock 132's after installation of the K&N. Runs pretty good now!
    Crasbars from http://barxon.pl/
    Engine / headlight guard from https://www.motomerta.pl/
    A croissaint-shaped main bag+others from http://21brothers.eu/ (A lot of quality stuff comes from Poland with a very reasonable price)
    Footpegs: https://www.outlawracing.nl/drc-ultra-wide-voetsteunen-sx-sxf-98-15-exc-f-98-16-tc-fc-14-15 (After some small modifications)
    15T front/49T rear. Or was this stock already?
    Installed second hand Pro-Oiler to conserve the chain.
    Heated grips
    USB+phone holder above the dashboard.

    Next week progressive fork springs!

    Running Mitas E-07 front and rear. Next set will be E-07 rear and TKC-80 front.
    Thinking about making the wheels fit for tubeless tires by covering the spoke nuts with Marine sealant. Anyone here that has done that?

    Attached Files:

  12. tag3

    tag3 Doofus

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    Location:
    Inland from the coast of Santa Cruz and Trona.
    After a few years and many miles, almost 50k, from Canada border to Mexico border and the Mississippi River. I have sold my Tranny and bought this. IMG_20201123_124720.jpg Have a good ride!
  13. Son of MotoPolo

    Son of MotoPolo The mountains are calling...

    Joined:
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    Somewhere north of SF, and west of CO
    Congrats! Count me among the jealous. I think the T700 is the only bike in production that ticks all the boxes that the TA does.

    I sat on one in the showroom, felt nimble despite the heft. How does it ride on the trails? Does it feel lighter than its ~450lb weight? I've stripped my TA down to about 400lbs wet and I don't know if I could stomach adding another 50 back. Granted, the T700 comes equipped with a few more horses to carry those extra pounds.
  14. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    Nice T7...how do you like it.....aside from the big grin..

    Ate:

    I really do not like K&N filters. At least for the dry dusty western US. They might be OK for road use or maybe a wetter European environment but out here they leak tiny particles past the filter. Best bet is oiled foam from UNI or the standard paper. Generally if the filter size stays the same, the only way you get more air through the filter is by making the small passages larger and reducing the filters action and purpose.

    Tubeless rims are NOT just a function of sealed spoke holes (or spokes that do not penetrate the rim like BMW et al. Tubeless rims have rim edge specifically designed to work with the tire bead on tubeless tires and make an airtight seal at the bead.

    Whether your particular non-tubeless rims will work effectively in this way or not is a gamble.

    The benefits to tubeless are: the ability to run lower pressures without risk of twisting the valve stem off of an inner tube - and - ease of puncture repair.

    But, if your tire bead separates from a rim not designed to be “tubeless” the loss of air and control will be almost instant. Even a large puncture with a tube will still give you a second or two to react before the rim/tirebead separates and things get sideways.....
    nomiles and Son of MotoPolo like this.
  15. tag3

    tag3 Doofus

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    Location:
    Inland from the coast of Santa Cruz and Trona.
    I like it a lot. Only 1100ish miles so far and almost half that was dirt in Death Valley and roads around the house. It's been through a river already.
    I have treated it like my Tranny, big dirtybike. Main reason I looked into it were the no electrogizmo b.s..
    Yes fuel injected, yes switchable ABS....but that's it.
    Do I mention I like it? I do.
  16. Ate

    Ate n00b

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    Good point about the K&N filter. I've installed it 5000km ago, I'm going to check it if it has dryed up. The summers in Europe are getting dryer, but there generally isn't that much dust . It's a shame the whole tank has to be removed for a filter change, I'm always struggeling with the breather and spill tubes at the bottom of the tank.

    I didn't consider the rim edge as a factor between tube/tubeless, but that sounds logical. Maybe it works, maybe it won't. This year I've screwed up three inner tubes by changing them manually, maybe I should just work om my tire changing technique haha.
    I've got the idea from this FortNine video, at the one minute mark he is sealing the spoke nuts. His rim edge doesn't look different from a Honda TA one, but there is a second 'ridge'. Not sure if the TA has that one too.
  17. Ladder106

    Ladder106 It's a short cut, really

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    He always does good videos. Don’t always agree with his ideas but you can’t fault the effort.
  18. Clem Kevin

    Clem Kevin Nude With Boots

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    Anyone need an OEM shock? Bought it before I got my Cogent shock for $100 shipped. I'll do $90 shipped to whoever wants it. Wasn't leaking, could use a fresh polish though.
  19. Fiftyfatponies

    Fiftyfatponies Been here awhile

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    Sweden
    I don't have any experience in tubeless motorcycle tyres but for mountainbikes this is standard nowadays. Altough the rims and tyres are called "tubeless ready". You then use a tape that seals the spokes and you also fill some sealant fluid into the tire that dries and glues the tire at the lip but stays fluid inside the tire. I plan to try that version when / if i get a small endurobike again. Don't think i personally would dare to try it in a heavy bike at higher speeds to be honest.
  20. Dudley

    Dudley Long timer Supporter

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    Chaska, Minnesota, Palm Desert, California
    I just checked my oil after repeated days sustained riding between 5500 and 6000 RPMs and my '89 doesn't use oil. It never has...Knock on wood!
    Dudley
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