Show us your TransAlp modifications!

Discussion in 'Japanese polycylindered adventure bikes' started by modrover, Apr 13, 2004.

  1. Mag Welder

    Mag Welder n00b Supporter

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    I hope you have some very soft rubber and plenty of studs to provide just the right grip..... (I used to ride winter enduro this time of the year, every year in the old years ....)
  2. CDA441

    CDA441 Belgian

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    I'm looking just for the cheapest dual sport tires I can get with the most agressive knobbies on it.
    Mitas C17 and C-02 are my wishes.
  3. Mag Welder

    Mag Welder n00b Supporter

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    Mitas has bought old Swedish manufacturer Trelleborg, legendary for their snow/ice race tires. The MITAS/TRELLEBORG WINTER FRICTION 454 18"/ C-17 21" as their standard enduro combination is called now, is the only race tires used in the woods in Scandinavia for the last decades, providing almost silly levels of grip on snow and/or ice. However, they are not cheap (has never been). This season's rear is about USD300....!
    Mitas.jpg
    choutos likes this.
  4. CDA441

    CDA441 Belgian

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    Yeah, the studded tire may be that expensive, however I'm talking about the non studded tires since it is not only for snow riding, also for mud pits, open fields and loose gravel.
    The Mitas C17 Stoneater costs around €60 (front)
  5. CDA441

    CDA441 Belgian

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    As promised, the Transalp Enduro/MX bike. Fitted the tires myself for the first time since the bike shoppes are friggin annoying since they don't want to put the tires on, even for money.
    It is so much more higher than before but that should probably help with the ground clearance.
    I also adjusted the suspension damping to the softest setting for ruts and all that.
    I'm going to try it out in the weekend.

    [​IMG]
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  6. Clem Kevin

    Clem Kevin Nude With Boots

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    Could you share what plastics you used?
  7. CDA441

    CDA441 Belgian

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    Those are from a crf450 2006
    I have made a custom subframe (detachable) and tank so the plastics could fit the bike
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  8. Honda-50

    Honda-50 Vet Lurker

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    SoCal since the beginning
    Spotted on the YouTube:

  9. 2old2Bbold

    2old2Bbold was 2bold2getold

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    Needs better tires, but obviously a good rider just to keep it upright. :clap
  10. captain jc

    captain jc wahoo Supporter

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    erkeley Honda/ yamaha and wait
    This is what I've been gearing up to do. could you share some pics and tell us how you went about it? Thanks, Grant
  11. CDA441

    CDA441 Belgian

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    https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRVhna6Wuj8WeokVcgDJl0Hntqrqe71aB

    I even have a playlist :)

    Here's the transali off road:
    [​IMG]

    It really feels weird with the bigass tire on front, it feels heavy to steer and is very "nervous" when riding slow, like the bars want to fall left or right.
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  12. Clem Kevin

    Clem Kevin Nude With Boots

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    Get some better forks on that sucker!
  13. CDA441

    CDA441 Belgian

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    I'm not going to put any more money in that sucker :jack
    The bike itself was 500€ but I almost spent tenfold to rebuild and modify it :lol2

    It already has upgraded hyperpro progressive springs and oil (and also a new hyperpro rear shock)
  14. Fiftyfatponies

    Fiftyfatponies Been here awhile

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    Cool! I'm trying to do something similar. Did you use pod filters on the carbs and if so how did you sort the jetting?
  15. CDA441

    CDA441 Belgian

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    Pod Filters from Aliexpress, I still need to put some filter socks over it to reduce the dust accumulation in the carbs.
    Jetting wasn't really that of a problem, it just rides too rich now but still pulls without any problem.
    Still needs a little bit of adjusting but for now everything runs good :)

    Just did some urban trails (farm tractor roads) man the front wheel just does not wash out anytime. It's a Heidenau K69 and a Maxxis C6006 Dual Sport Trail.
    I find that on loose ground like wet grass and mud these 2 tires are solid.

    EDIT after 1 day:
    This is how it kinda went:
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  16. CDA441

    CDA441 Belgian

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    Went down in fresh ploughed and muddy farmland and got er dirty

    Also got a video of all the offroading I did


    [​IMG]
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  17. seltSam87

    seltSam87 Adventurer

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    IMG_20210124_164815.jpg IMG_20210124_164820.jpg IMG_20210124_164827.jpg my transalp has grown a little over the years
  18. andy74rc

    andy74rc There's always a way out.

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    Hello Sam. I'm about to rally mod mine. Would you be so kind to detail you suspension mods?
  19. seltSam87

    seltSam87 Adventurer

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    Hello Andy,

    of course. So what I did exactly on the suspension ist change fork and rear shock, handlebar and add a fork stabilizer.

    Fork
    Comes from 1996 Honda XR600R. So its already has the cartridge System with 17mm diameter front axle. Before 1993 it was a simple damper rod. The diameter changed in 1991 but I'm not sure about that. I completely rebuilt the fork and mounted linear öhlins springs for Yamaha XT660Z Tenere with 6 N/mm and 10W fork oil. The XR fork legs are 90mm longer than Transalp 1994 fork legs. Please note that older transalp model forks might be a bit longer I think that changed in 1988. The XR fork with the Öhlins springs work very well. The springs are not too stiff and I measured the exact values for preload fitting to my weight. You can adjust spring preload by adding spacaers with required length. Really happy with it.

    Transalp front wheel doesn't fit beacuase axle diamter is 15mm and also the brake disc comes to cloose to the fork. You need a XR front wheel, pay attention to beariung diameter. I git me a used one and put in new spokes. Of course Transalp front brake doesn't fit any more. Transalp caliper and brake disc don't fit on XR fork and wheel. So stick to XR calpiter. I tried XR disc and it worksbut it will get you into serious trouble if you have to brake hard or go downhill. Even for offroad its too weak so using XR dis is no option. I bought an adapter plate for stock xr caliper and mounted a 320mm brake disc. Both was made for a XR supermoto conversion. Works well. There are other calipters available but imho my setup is fine espcially cosnidering that you don't want to lock up your front wheel everytime you hit the brakes offroad. You also have to take care about pistion sizes. Older Alps have a 13mm pump piston which might be a bit too much for XR caliper piston. Older XR use 25 mm caliper piston later models 27mm. Its really important to mount matching parts here beacause. A 13 mm pump pistion for instance reduces required lever travel which might be too much for offroad. I want more lever travel for better controlability. SO my alp has enough praking performance in every situation now. I noticed a little bit of fork flex when braking hard so I mounted a fork stabilizer. I also mounted a 28mm Magura handlebar. Works perfectly now.

    You have to find a solution for fuse box and ignition lock. I mounted the fuse box hidden next to the navigation tower. The heavy ignition lock i threw threw away.
    Ignition now runs through a switch with a 40 amp relay

    Shock
    In the rear I started with a longer shock from YSS which actually worked well. The shock body itself was lenghtened and additionally there was a +/- 5mm adjuster at the shock fork. I was fine with a total lenght of 390mm. Stock length transalp is 375, older models 360mm. Also the linkage changed around 1988. Transalp 1994 linkage ratio is 2,5. After installing the shock and some testrides I was happy but also annoyed about the low suspension travel in the rear (about 200 mm). In addition, the fork looked a bit fragile at the bottom because of the adjuster. probably dangerous off-road.So I asked around and figuered out a solution togehter with the suspension guys from wilbers. They built a longer shock (390mm) with more stroke (93 instead of stock 1994 transalp 73 mm). shok is made for offroading with proper heavy duty fork and spring mount. I wanted a fork as short as possible for for highest stability. So fork and spring mount are custom made to prevent colission with linkage. This gives my alp 50mm more suspension travel in the rear. So its 285mm front and 250 mm in the rear. The shock is also adjustable in preload, high and low speed compression and rebound. It was really a lot to calculate especially because of the pro link system and its behaviour with different shock lenghts and pistion stroke. You also have to make sure that wheel and the swing arm have enough space because my shock now allows the swingarm to go more high because the additional stroke is greater than the 15 mm extension of the shock itself. Also recommended chain tension is now obsolote. You will have to measure out with no shock mounted where the chain is most tight and then gibe +/-5 mm. My chain slack on side stand is now 55 to 65 mm.

    All very expensive and a lot of work. But my Alps Suspension wroks perfectly now.

    Hope that helped you so far. In Germany, every conversion must be approved by the authorities. For those buys I wrote an even more detailed report with pictures. If you need more information, I can try to translate it into english.

    Regards
    Sam

    edit: My alp is from 1994
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  20. Son of MotoPolo

    Son of MotoPolo The mountains are calling...

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    "In Germany, every conversion must be approved by the authorities."

    WHAT?? You can't tinker on your machines w/o getting approval first? Or is it just for highway vehicles? I guess that would make some sense.