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Ski Areas mandated Closed by GOV????????????

Discussion in 'The Rockies – It's all downhill from here...' started by 1Gopokes1, Mar 15, 2020.

  1. 1Gopokes1

    1Gopokes1 Been here awhile Supporter

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    Durango CO back in CO Bama sucked
    WTF

    This is spring break the $$$$$ maker season.
    people that are skiing are outside in the sunshine, mostly covered from Head to toe. Breathing fresh air

    how stupid
    #1
  2. y4m4

    y4m4 Calvin

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    I'm a bit surprised the ski resorts were some of the first to affected.

    I only have 8 days on my Loveland season pass :(:
    #2
  3. RideFreak

    RideFreak Torque Junky

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    Spring break students are busy packing up their dorm rooms, their colleges are closing.

    A week from now I doubt you'll be able to sit in a restaurant and eat and that's just the start. Staying home is a great idea right now.
    #3
    Andrew, Wookee, Dan Diego and 8 others like this.
  4. Boricua

    Boricua Long timer

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    Skiing is not the issue. Its the packed bathrooms and the bars after. Add the 10 people to a 2 bedroom condo and you have a good reason to shut everything down.
    #4
    Wookee, dmac1, Dan Diego and 6 others like this.
  5. PluckyPurcell

    PluckyPurcell unabashed n00b

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    It's unfortunate for everyone (visitors, locals, seasonal employees) but it's the right thing to do. The resort towns have a disproportionate number of retirees and elderly living in them full-time. These areas are relatively isolated but see a huge influx of visitors in the winter; Steamboat has a population of ~13,000 people but that almost triples on our busiest weekends. The resort towns are already a seasonal petri dish this time of year with so many people coming and going (over half of whom live outside of Colorado, and of course a decent portion of which are international).

    Many of the outbreaks that have already happened in the state are clustering in the high country; our medical facilities simply cannot accommodate people getting sick (for context - my girlfriend is a nurse here in Steamboat and we already struggled with flu season). We have one small hospital with a limited emergency department and then three urgent care facilities, only one of which is open 24-7. Our friend is an MD and saw 50+ people last week with upper respiratory issues and fever... and yet couldn't get her hands on a single COVID-19 test kit, even for people who were really sick.

    We know it's already here - now it's just a matter of minimizing exposure and transmission, especially since early testing wasn't pursued. The resort is closed, the gym is closed, the library is closed, the schools and daycares are closed, I'm being told to work from home, the grocery stores haven't been restocked with food (or TP)... it all sucks, but I think it's the right call. The truth is that the circumstances weren't dealt with appropriately early on; now, it's likely to be getting worse before it gets better. Trust the pathologists, trust the epidemiologists. I don't blame anyone who's a skeptic of the government and the institutional response (or lack thereof), but we should absolutely be listening to the experts.
    #5
  6. Husky360C

    Husky360C Been here awhile

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    I believe governments are trying to limit the number of people who get sick to a number the health care systems can actually deal with, by taking measures which reduce the number of new infections.

    As the gentleman from Steamboat already mentioned, their health care facilities are already near the limit of what they can deal with.

    If no closures are enacted, the numbers of infected people WILL quickly overwhelm the capability of health care systems, and when tens, or even hundreds of thousands of people are being turned away from hospitals, that's going to make whatever inconveniences are happening now look trivial in comparison.

    Visualize this : there are around 50,000,000 people age 65 and older in the US.

    If 2% of those people die from the coronavirus, that means 1 million people die.

    Since 2% is actually below current death rates for the coronavirus, something like this is within the realm of possibility if no measures are taken to limit the spread of the virus. This is why the government taking actions which are intended to limit the spread of infection.

    Right now it all looks like an "over reaction" on the part of the government, but this is the nature of such situations. If you wait until it's obvious there is a severe problem, it will be far too late and a lot more people will die ( millions more ).
    #6
    Dan Diego, joe a, AbeWhat and 8 others like this.
  7. fred flintstone

    fred flintstone Long timer

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    It's not just the effect on the ski towns and their residents. It's the traveling to get there from all over the world, the mixing together at all those social areas once at the resort town, and then traveling back home. Picking up and or shedding viruses every step along the way. It's a super spreader type of scenario that you want to eliminate.
    #7
    dmac1, Dan Diego, AbeWhat and 2 others like this.
  8. handensco

    handensco Been here awhile Supporter

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    In NM our restaurants are not to be over 50% full. I have to investigate this today. I am not sure how you tell people that they can not come in and have to wait until some people leave. Our drive thru has been busier the last few days more so than normal. Taos is closed but not sure about Red River, Angel fire or Sipapu
    #8
  9. wakewop

    wakewop Hucker

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    Ski areas ordered to shut down, but movie theaters are still open. Odd.
    #9
  10. OTB

    OTB Oh fer Chrissakes

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    It’s people flying in. DIA is usually a zoo this time of year.
    #10
  11. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    I think a more nuanced approach would have been wiser. There’s no major risk in my driving for 50 minutes to a bay, parking at the beach, and having a bit of fun on the slopes then driving home. ABay had a nice response where they limited indoor access, and chairs to related parties, but kept the lifts spinning.
    #11
  12. taosgsr

    taosgsr Been here awhile Supporter

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    How many ventilators does the USA have? We might be finding out soon enough but I sure hope we don’t.
    #12
  13. MountainsandRivers

    MountainsandRivers loves dirty things! Supporter

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    I'm not happy about the situation but I get it. We only have an emergency clinic in Telluride. We don't really have the resources to handle our own communities population if we get just a few cases, let alone a more expanded population of tourists. I could see day skiing being less impact, but where do you call it once the ball is rolling? Playing it safe is better for now.
    I'm just jealous of my cousin. He has been diving in Roatan for a few months. Air travel is now halted for a while, cruise ships already stopped. I really would like to ride this out on an isolated beach somewhere...but isolated on a mesa in the mountains isn't a bad second choice I guess.
    #13
  14. Boricua

    Boricua Long timer

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    Here you go. Plenty of room to ride and no one to give you a bug. 1367376903.jpg
    #14
  15. Cheddarhead

    Cheddarhead Perenial Noobie!

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    Pewaukee....Lakes, Rivers, Kettles, and Moraines
    Living this experience as we speak.

    Up until yesterday, I was a Full-Time employee at one of the Resorts in Park City....now I am unemployed.

    All of the resorts have closed here.
    All of the Resort Guests are being credited / refunded for their Rentals...and being "encouraged" to vacate the premises immediately.
    > Condo Owners can stay...but all of the Lodges are now "no-service provided...." status.
    > No restaurants, no housekeeping, no rides or concierge services, etc....
    All of the local Restaurants have closed, as well. Some are offering "curb service" but this will end shortly...there isn't enough demand to justify opening the kitchens / preparing food for an unknown quantity of carry-out diners.

    Packing up / heading out in a day or so.
    #15
  16. VxZeroKnots

    VxZeroKnots Long timer

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    6.1k hospitals in the US
    924k Hospital beds in the US
    estimated 62k ventilators @ ~20 ventilators per 150 beds in an average hospital

    Sources:
    https://www.cambridge.org/core/jour...re-hospitals/F1FDBACA53531F2A150D6AD8E96F144D
    https://www.thoracic.org/patients/patient-resources/resources/mechanical-ventilation.pdf
    https://www.npr.org/sections/health...emic-spreads-will-there-be-enough-ventilators
    https://www.aha.org/statistics/fast-facts-us-hospitals

    If you're curious about the infection by county here are the official stats. CO has been rising about 15 infections per day since I started paying attention last week.
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/...G63Oa1ztz4B4r7xG_wsoC9ucd_ei3--Pz7UD50yQD/pub

    As was said earlier, it's not about locals making it to mountains for some turns, it's about keeping crowds from traveling and congregating. It may seem like an overreaction now, but if we don't stay ahead of this the estimate is 1.7m dead nationwide with a near 70% of the country being infected per last weeks numbers. The healthcare system can't support the normal load plus that additional load
    #16
  17. _CJ

    _CJ Rugged Individualist

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    It's the right thing to do. What's not right is to leave people living paycheck to paycheck twisting in the wind. There's discussion of emergency universal basic income to help people through this thing, and I really hope it happens. Unfortunately, they already gave 1.5 trillion to the banks. That's enough money to give every man, woman, and child in this country $1000/mo for five months.

    I've always heard that you can't predict what's going to cause the next economic collapse, and I don't know that anyone saw this coming. If it goes on long enough, we're going to have people losing their homes, going bankrupt, cars getting repo'd, etc.


    .
    #17
  18. VxZeroKnots

    VxZeroKnots Long timer

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    +a-million

    I would be shocked if there isn't more support for an expansion of social programs following this. They won't be free but neither are aircraft carriers and cruise missiles but we don't wait till a war starts to build plenty of those.
    #18
  19. RideFreak

    RideFreak Torque Junky

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    Well said VxZeroKnots,
    This was downplayed here in the US from day one as everyone watched Asia become infected, health experts warning us the entire time. Unfortunately with the current political climate the warnings were perceived as having a political agenda and the refusal to acknowledge the situation was also politically motivated, now the US is waking up to what we've been watching Asia go through. Pretty fuckin sad that there's even a political slant to this in anyway, its clouded the US response and that already coming back to haunt us. Hindsight is 20/20 but had this been approached seriously and without bias from the start we'd be in a much better place right now.
    #19
  20. fred flintstone

    fred flintstone Long timer

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    Well I agree with your general sentiment but the $1.5T was not just given to the banks. It's what's called a repo operation and basically the Fed buys loans (outstanding paper) that banks hold and charges very low rates. It's like they take the paper as collateral for a short term cash loan. Then the banks have to buy them back, often the next day, and pay interest, which right now is very low. It is intended to provide short term liquidity and avoid banking system lock up, which would hurt Joe & Josephine 6-pack quite a bit if it happened. Not having enough money is maybe not as bad as not being able to get ANY of the money you already have. In any case helicopter money, justifiable or not, for ordinary people is the purview of Congress, not the Fed.
    #20
    Wookee likes this.