Sleeping Bags

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by ckinneavy, Jun 9, 2011.

  1. ckinneavy

    ckinneavy Adventurer

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    I am sure this is a loaded question but it time for a new sleeping bag. And I was hoping for some recommendations I think I want a rectangle or semi rectangle bag because I have fairly broad shoulders. As far as temperature rating goes it can get pretty chilly in the northeast and I do like to camp early in the spring and late in the fall. Any help would be great
    #1
  2. Bigger Al

    Bigger Al Still a stupid tire guy Supporter

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    #2
  3. Gale B.T.

    Gale B.T. Long timer

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    +++ 1 on what Bigger Al say on the Big Agnes, also, here is one that I have and recommend after many many nights in the higher mountains.


    http://www.wiggys.com/

    gale
    #3
  4. sonoran

    sonoran bigly Supporter

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    Check out Kelty Coromell down bags. I have the 0* bag in a long, it's really spacious, warm and packs down small.
    #4
  5. Gillies

    Gillies Long timer

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    Zero degree or better rating. Lord knows how many 15-20 degree bags I've frozen in over the years. You can always unzip when too hot, but a cold night in a weak bag is plain miserable.
    #5
  6. muddbutt

    muddbutt Pork Chop Expert

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    Get the warmest, lightest, most packable bag + a silk liner. It is hard to stay warm when it is cool out. And if it is warm, you don't need a bag. use the silk liner. When warmer, you can sleep on top of it and just use a silk bag. Ultra Light Montbell super spiral hugger. Very comfortable, great zipper, hugs your body without binding.
    #6
  7. bush pilot

    bush pilot Long timer

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    ++1 On the Wiggy's gear. Wiggy's performs exceptionally well in adverse conditions.
    Picture yourself a cold rainy night, soaking wet, all your gear soaking wet, you are freezing cold borderline hypothermic; then you crawl into the soaking wet Wiggy bag, by morning you will be dry and toasty warm. A Wiggy's bag will not only save your life but keep you reasonably comfortable in the process.
    There is a reason the USAF has a Wiggy's bag tucked under the seat of thier fighter jets.
    #7
  8. JR356

    JR356 Long timer

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  9. SoCalJeff

    SoCalJeff In the wind

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  10. rickypanecatyl

    rickypanecatyl SE Asia adventure tours

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    I'm sure you already know the basics but I'll put a refresher here to confuse you with all the options :lol3:

    Goosedown is warmer and packs smaller than any of the synthetic fills BUT can be harder to take care of, loses most all its insulating ability if it becomes wet and is more expensive.

    A given volume of goosedown insulates about the same. A given weight of goose down of course weighs the same and packs down to about the same size.

    "400fp" is cheap goosedown (similar to the best synthetic). It means 1 gram of it can be "fluffed out" to 400 cubic centimeters in size.

    "800fp" is excellent goosedown - the same weight will fill 800 cubic centimeters.

    Most people find rectangular bags the comfiest, then semi-rectangulars and last of all mummy bags. I personally have a hard time with mummy bags. However even if they were made of the same material, to get the same tempature rating rectangular bags weigh about 2X as much (of course depending on the dimensions).

    Big Agnes are basically semi rectangulars which many of us find to be a good compromise. Also the Agnes bag assumes everyone uses a mat and so basically have no insulation on the bottom allowing it to pack tighter/be lighter. I like that concept as well as the "dual side" concept - where with one side up its rated 15 and the other side up its rated at 40.

    Also if you are not aware of it there is a new, completely different rating system out there for tempts and last time I looked at bags it seemed many were in transition. The same bag under the old system might be rated at 0f and the new system at 20F. I look at is as the older system was rated for survival and the new system for comfort.

    Another thing I look at is how comfy the inner lining is next to the skin (mudd butt mentioned silk liners which are great). Another detail I care about in that I'm a light sleeper and sleep in bags all the time is how noisy is the outer shell when you move around in the night. Just sayin cuz there's some bags out there that make quite a bit noise when you move...

    Feathered friends in Seattle Washington makes custom bags. If I was looking for one bag that can do everything down to 0F, I would have 3 parts. The base being a large, semi rectangular synthetic bag comfort rated down to about 40F. Then a silk liner, and very importantly a 800 fill goosedown blanket 2/3 the size of the sleeping bag with attachment points on it and the bag that allow it to drape over the zipper. I'd keep the goosedown blanket in a small drysack.
    #10
  11. Callahan

    Callahan Long timer

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  12. BlueKhan

    BlueKhan n00b

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    For about $100 Mountain Hardware has a synthetic bag called the flip...rated 25 degrees/ 40 degrees depending on which side is up. It ways less than 3lbs...plenty of room and compresses well. I tend to sleep hot but have used this bag at 10k+ feet of elevation in early spring. I wore a wool hat and socks in the bag and threw a insulated sweater on when the temps dipped down into the teens.
    #12
  13. forrestlaw

    forrestlaw Been here awhile

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    +1 on big agnes. Their shape should be more comfortable than most mummy bags. Just make sure you get their insulated air core mattress since you like to camp early/late in the season (they also make an uninsulated one that is fine for summer)
    #13
  14. kfsinc

    kfsinc Chaingolian Observer Supporter

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    I just purchased the Big Agnes Hog Park in a long from Amazon. I've not slept in it, but I'm very impressed. Note that Big Agnes bags require a pad -- the one I have (and all of them, I think) only has a sleave on the bottom for a pad, no insulation. This looks like agreat feature 'cause you'll never roll off the pad. It also has a pocket for a pillow. I'm bringing my very light weight summer bag as a liner on the trip to Alaska and expect to be very compfy :clap
    #14
  15. Wuwei

    Wuwei Long timer

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    Maybe I'm warm blooded, but I find anything warmer than a summer-weight bag is way too warm in the summer, when I do most of my camping. Plus, if there is a cold snap I can put on a fleece jacket, some sweat pants, some wool socks, and maybe even a fleece beeny and be toasty down to freezing in a summer bag. Even if I'm camping in the winter I prefer to go with a bit lighter bag and layer up if I need to. Hence, I find the cheapy Coleman or even WalMart bags work well. I bought a couple of bags for $5 at Walmart that I have been using for a couple of years. Sure, they won't last long, but at $5 I can buy a new one every couple of years.
    #15
  16. Joe3

    Joe3 Been here awhile

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    I second this opinion. I carry a 20 degree bag and a fleece liner. Cold weather I use both. Medium weather just the bag. Warm weather just the liner. Works well for a wide range of conditions and doesn't take up more room than a thicker sleeping bag when packing.
    #16
  17. sledneck

    sledneck Been here awhile

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  18. JTucker

    JTucker Long timer

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    I have a Go-lite ultra 3 season 20 degree quilt. Very nicely made and warm. packs tiny as well.
    #18
  19. Parrothead

    Parrothead Cu Dubh

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    I swear by'em. Some don't like the mummy design, and you have to learn to turn the bag when you turn... Not turn inside it as with a conventional bag. Light, highly compressible, can be vacuum-packed (re Air Force reference above), seem to never lose their loft. I have the 2 bag system, use it year 'round, been comfy from +60° (unzipped) to -10°F (wearing polypro longjohns).
    #19
  20. bmwktmbill

    bmwktmbill Traveler

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