SMALL bike camping thread

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by RAZR, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. RAZR

    RAZR u may run the risks my friend but I do the cutting

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    i understand this subject might have been talked to death, BUT i am talking ENDURO riding (off-road) and bikes that are NOT GS1200, KTM ADV, Vstroms, etc.

    bikes that are thumpers..... 500cc and under (yes, my previous KLR i could pack a fridge on the back).

    more so i am talking about bikes with aluminum (weak) subframes, and the NEED to pack light.

    i also wanna know what you eat on the road, what you bring with you for food, how you plan your routes according to food/gas (smaller tanks), and do you primitive camp or find a campsite.

    i plan on doing a few long distance camping trips on my KTM 525 (a big bike to some, small compared to a KTM ADV).

    try not to flood this thread with negative responses. take that shit to Jo Momma.:deal

    now back to the subject
    #21
    NxtGoRnd likes this.
  2. wallache

    wallache Been here awhile

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    Great thread! There is alot to be learned from the backpacking and bicycle touring crowds. The biggest difference, though, is on a motorcycle you will see civilization at least once a day to fuel up. No need to carry 8 meals, 5 liters of water, and a 12 pack of beer. Reducing consumables will cut quite a bit of weight and space off of your camp kit.

    One of my favorite lightweight foods is couscous. Add a pouch of chicken (similar to the tuna pouches) and a squirt of olive oil makes a calorie dense meal that one person would have a hard time finishing.
    #22
  3. Fast1

    Fast1 Twisted Throttle

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    As for food products that minimize the prep, cook and clean up time while still providing tasty nourishment, I prefer the Mountain House product.

    I've tried about every competitors product in this category and some have not even been of quality to feed the ravens.

    http://www.mtnhse.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=M&Category_Code=MHDL

    You need to try these at home and determine what agrees to your pallete prior to your adventure.

    Another plus of this product is that you pour boiling water into the sealable pouch, let it cook and eat from the pouch which minimizes plates, bowls and any washing after eating.

    This is the stove I use.. MSR Pocket Rocket which has its own storage container to prevent damage during non-use. weight 3 oz exluding fuel

    [​IMG]


    I only bring one small cook pot large enought to boil at least 2 cups of water. Titanium cook pot by REI. .9L size

    [​IMG] 4.9 oz

    http://www.rei.com/product/764181?preferredSku=7641810010&cm_mmc=cse_froogle-_-datafeed-_-product-_-7641810010&mr:trackingCode=7C894FFE-FB85-DE11-B7F3-0019B9C043EB&mr:referralID=NA


    I have two down sleeping bags both made by Marmot that have dry-loft outer fabric that resists moisture. The Colour (-5F, 3lbs 3 oz) and Pinnacle (15F, 2lbs, 12 oz ). Both are very compact while transporting due to high down fill content of 800+.

    For ultra light trips I use a North Face Trek Bivy a single wall tent. 2lbs 7oz. This tent is extremely compact when packed. Not sure if they are still available but they may have been replaced by North Face with a new product of similar design. It is a two stake tent that can be set up on very hard ground which again reduces overall weight. Since you do not have to tack in 5 or 6 stakes your tent site selection becomes greater.. with more opportunity to stay in unique spots.

    [​IMG]


    overnight set up..
    Marmot Rain suit, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, tarp, breakfast, flash light, butane lighter and tools in a waterproof stuff stack with tent in black stuff stack on top. About 10lbs including minimalist tools/tube for trailside repair.

    [​IMG]


    This is the water purifyer I carry for mulit-day use.. Katadyn Ceramic Mini Filter.. Filters down to .2 microns. The filter easily cleans with a 3M scrub pad trail side. Filters that screen down to .2 microns will clog quicker in glacier fed or dirty run off water so cleaning ease is mandatory on mulitday trips with several individuals. The Mini filters out carriers of dangerous illnesses such as Giardia, Cholera, Typhoid, amebas, salmonella and others. Weight 8 oz and approx 6"x2"x3".



    [​IMG]


    If I need optics I carry Leuopold compact 9X in military green with inidvidual eye adjustments. These were purchased back in 90's when top end Leuopold binocs had Leica lens. Weight about 10 oz. cost $750+. Fit in a 5"x2.75"X1.75" soft case.


    [​IMG]


    For a camp light I use the Black Diamond Spot headlamp. 50grams w/o batteries

    http://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/en-us/shop/mountain/lighting/spot-2009


    For navigation I use a Zumo 550 and if lengthly uncharted terrain will be encountered I bring along a small handheld, Garmin Summit.


    More later....
    #23
  4. Dilligaf0220

    Dilligaf0220 Miserablist

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    How about hobo or twig stoves? Takes a little longer to heat up than a Jetboil but as a canoe camper that has found too many of those fuel bottles in the campfire pit I have an inbred hatred of all canister stoves. You can make your own hobo stove out of any medium-large steel can or go whole hog for the collapsible stainless steel production jobbies.

    <object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/sesECu07Pxs?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/sesECu07Pxs?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
    #24
  5. enigmatic

    enigmatic Adventurer

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    [​IMG]

    Multi-day dual sport camp kit includes tarp, sleeping bag, matches, tools, tubes and rain gear.
    #25
  6. RAZR

    RAZR u may run the risks my friend but I do the cutting

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    GREAT ideas so far guys :thumb


    i'm going to keep post #1 updated with what i find and what others bring to the table.

    i want this thread to be similar to the "toolkit thread" where it will be ongoing.:deal


    here's another inmates camping prep.

    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=566863
    #26
  7. Stu

    Stu Buffo Maximus Supporter

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    Great thread, especially since I plan on taking my 525 EXC to Alaska next summer and have to pack light for that. I modified the Dirt Bagz rack from an '03 to work on my '07 (Pgs. 12 thru 14 on the 525 As An Adventure Bike thread). So far I am planning on a ultra light tent, sleeping bag, light mattress and freeze dried food heated with the jet boil. I will probably add the Coyote bag on top of the Dirt Bagz Ranger bags. That will be all I can take and still clear the seat with my leg. The 525 is a tall bike. And I have mine set up to run crazy fast. I will also take my DSLR and a few lenses in my Wolfman tank bag.

    Stu
    #27
  8. RAZR

    RAZR u may run the risks my friend but I do the cutting

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    what is the load/weight capacity on the 525 EXC?

    i am going to buy the Coyote Giant Loop (i already have the MoJavi for day trips).
    #28
  9. Pete O Static

    Pete O Static Adventure Seeker

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    I don't ride a smaller enduro, I ride an f800GS but I am a fanatical minimalist and hope I can offer you some good ideas. I can pack for an indefinite trip with just a set of wolfman dry saddlebags and the small double ended duffel. These would easily fit on your ride.

    http://www.wolfmanluggage.com/Saddle/teton_saddle_bags.html
    http://www.wolfmanluggage.com/Expedition/expd_double_end_duffel.html

    The double ended duffel looks big in the picture but the beauty of it is that it is totally adjustable to what you got in it.

    First off, the shelter I carry is super light, small, freestanding ( with cross pole ) and has a vestibule. Weighs in at about 2lbs.

    http://www.tarptent.com/moment.html

    Add to that an air mattress to sleep on, a self inflating pillow and a first aid kit. These are what go into the duffel because they are the lightest and the duffel sits on the tail of the bike where I do not want weight. ( With the first aid kit located here in the double ended duffel, it is accessible no matter which side the bike has fallen on. )

    For cooking, once again, minimalist and I like stuff that does double duty. I carry a surplus military cookset and mess kit. I have something like the BCB Crusader but I sourced the parts from a local supplier for about half the cost. Various fuels are easily found everywhere and you can even use twigs in a pinch. Along my travels, I have always been able to find various sources of fuel for the stove whenever I hit a town and re-provision.

    http://thekittchensink.blogspot.com/2010/10/review-3-bcb-crusader-cook-system.html

    This takes up about 25% of one bag. Along with that, I pack a mess tin kit. Again surplus. This doubles as a plate, frying pan and sauce pan. Between the two is my sleeping bag which is cinched down in a compression sack. This has now filled 50% of one of the wolfman bags or about 9 liters of space. Along the inside of the bag, standing on end is one of these: It is called a campsaw plus. Stores in a small tube and within minutes, assembles to a great camp saw which allows you to get enough firewood for an all night fire. Once that is done, it converts into a pot holder and with the optional grill, you can actually BBQ on the fire you just made with it. I have the grill in this bag also.

    http://www.modernoutpost.com/gear/details/ui_campsaw.php

    I even carry a chair! Because it is nice to sit by the fire. It lies on top of the sleeping bag and mess kit / stove.


    http://www.alitedesigns.com/monarch-camp-chair-5



    So now we have shelter, heat and a means to cook and we are only half way there as far as available space goes.

    In the next bag, I pack clothing, toiletries and microfiber towel and a silnylon tarp which is kept in a dry sack. Clothing is done in layers and all synthetic. I carry 3 pairs of synthetic underwear, 3 pairs of synthetic socks, three synthetic shirts, 2 sweaters of varying warmth which can be layered together and a pair of synthetic pants which have zip off legs and convert to shorts. That all goes into a compression stuff sac and packs down to about the size of a grapefruit. Because everything is synthetic, it dies quickly so when I am in a lake or taking a shower, I am also washing out clothing with camp soap. It is dry by morning. Oh yeah and a pair of flip flops. I keep some space in the top of this bag for my riding outerwear. I have a Klim traverse and don't always wear the jacket, so I keep space in the top to stuff it when I don't need it.

    As for food, I learned to drink tea without the milk and sugar. I am a huge coffee fan and camping coffee does not do it for me. I now actually quite like clear tea. Packets of oatmeal are real easy for breakfast. I try to eat fresh as much as possible by getting a banana or some apples when I pass through a town. I can also buy fresh in town and cook on the campsaw BBQ. I avoid fast food at all costs. For the other times when I am really away, I carry some of that boil in a bag curry or beef stroganoff.

    Now for the fuel part and this will probably be the biggest challenge on a small enduro unless you have an extended range tank. I personally hate "tankering" fuel around in either small bottles or rotopax containers which require expensive and sometimes complicated mounting hardware. Again, trying my best to keep it simple, I carry a foldable bladder which I only use if I know I will need it. As soon as I have burned 2 gals out of my tank, the bladder gets emptied and folded back up.

    http://www.justgastanks.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=365&products_id=1155

    I have a tool tube down low on the crashbars, so I do not carry tools in the bags. With this setup, the bike is lean and clean, doesn't look like a pack mule and I can literally cross the country.

    I hope that gives you some ideas.

    Cheers
    #29
  10. farrington300

    farrington300 No wait....What?

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    Tent = alps mountaineering zephyr II, 100 bucks and packs to 6x18. It feels like pretty good quality
    <?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><o:p> </o:p>
    Sleeping Pad = exped syn mat 9 dlx, 120 bucks and packs very small. I bought the 9 because it is thicker, and the dlx because it is wider and longer, and the syn because the down was too much money. I am a side sleeper with a bum neck, so the sleeping pad is really important to me. This thing is worth the money and size. Blow up pillow completes the set.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Sleeping bag = Highpeak comfort pak 20. 60 bucks, it packs too big, but I wanted a bag that was not mummy (square bottom), was not down, had a hood and could be zipped together (for when the lady comes along). This met the requirements. If I was going to pack smaller, I would buy a new bag for sure.<o:p></o:p>
    <o:p> </o:p>
    pot and pan = Snopeak trek-900 aluminum, 20 bucks for a pot and pan. works good for water and small meals. I can cook some pretty good stuff in this setup
    <o:p> </o:p>
    guyot squishy bowl and cup, packs small and cleans up easy. I also have a bunch of small containers from REI that hold salt, pepper, oil, eggs, etc.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Tringia alcohol stove, 20 bucks off ebay with a wind stopping stand. its not the hottest or fastest, but it will burn regular denatured alcohol, which can be bought from any store an earth. I carry fuel in 8oz plastic bottles from REI. Figure about 2-4oz per day.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Other = small tripod chair, towel, lantern,
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Packing = Aerostitch soft bags, plus a 40L sealine zip duffel.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    tent straps to KLR rack, sleeping bag and a few other odds and ends in one side, everything else plus other odds and ends goes in the other side. cloths and toiletries computer, ipad, etc. goes in duffel bag. Yes I camp off my KLR, which has a ton o space, but if I bought a new sleeping bag that packed small and a giant loop bag system, I could easily camp off my XR.
    <o:p> </o:p>
    Food... I could go on for ever. A few favorites are can of chili and instant rice (vegi chili is good too) and eggs with dried potatoes. Can tuna, oat meal, mixed nuts, all make a good meal. Really the food thing comes down to what you feel like carrying. I find my self stopping for lunch and keeping half for dinner. Then all I need to carry is beer and after dinner snacks, which can be purchased at the last gas stop of the day. I will cook a dinner now and then. Mostly I use the cooking stuff for breakfast. <o:p></o:p>

    If your doing it right, this should be a constant learning process.
    #30
  11. kitesurfer

    kitesurfer Long timer

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    "try not to flood this thread with negative responses. take that shit to Jo Momma"

    sorry, but that comes across as RUDE!
    #31
  12. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    I am a long way from some sort of freak who bags his dirty toiletpaper and takes it home. I happily burn most things if I have a fire*, but I can guarantee, after a fire, there will be no sign that I was there. I have never been able to fathom how someone who enjoys the outdoors can leave the fuel canisters in the remains of their campfire. They weigh next to nothing, they take up very little space, they're not dirty, you had enough space to carry them out with you. Would it kill these people to take them home with them?

    *even tin cans, to clean them in a water-conserving manner, before hammering them flat in the morning with a rock and taking them back with me.
    #32
  13. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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    im a big bike camper, (anyway you want to look at it, 6'2", 220lb, 550lb 1000cc bike) and in europe its difficult to camp where you cant find a shop, so i dont actually pack much food apart from a few sauces and spices. dont need to lug a table or have a huge range bolted to the back of the bike, i use a trangia stove on the ground.

    and there is absolutely no excuse to leave trash about, put it in a shopping bag, tie it to the bike somewhere and dump it when you pass a bin.
    #33
  14. VStromTom

    VStromTom Long timer

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    Well thought out set up Peteostatic. You have pricey stuff but many of us buy something hoping it will work for our needs knowing we should have spent a little extra to begin with 'cause we gonna sooner or later anyway. Good job.
    #34
  15. Pete O Static

    Pete O Static Adventure Seeker

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    Thanks Tom. For me, it was even more pricey because I did go the cheaper route several times before I ultimately ended up with what I have now. A lot of it is trial and error and what works for you. I love these threads for that. It is great seeing what ideas people have come up with and what works for them.
    #35
  16. Dazed Productions

    Dazed Productions Been here awhile

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    I am in a similar situation to you. I am about to get a 525 and am planning some long camping trips in the summer. I have done 30 day solo camping trips out of a backpack so am due to be taking similar gear. My tent was a Ultimate Hobo but it died after about 25 years of service :( Getting a hilleberg Nallo2 to replace it. If you want a tent to last 25 years, Hilleberg make pretty damn good tents! The nallo 2 is a 2 person so I didn't go for the lightest available but its a similar weight to my old one.

    For stoves, I have a sigg firejet (petrol/coleman fuel stove). It requires a bit of TLC if you don't want it to fireball on you but it works once you get use to its quirks. Might change it to a primus omnifuel.

    Sleeping bags, I have a 3+ season rab down bag and a lightweight mountain gear 1 season synthetic bag. I am thinking I might want something in between for what I have planned as the rab is a lot larger!

    I have ordered a promoto billet rack (currently wondering where that has got to?!), I plan on putting a Pelican case ontop as a top box. I plan on using ortlieb paniers as Ortlieb stuff is seriously solid and waterproof. I am expecting to take the bike and the bags to my friendly local welder and getting him to make me some supports for the panniers.

    Also on my list, bigger tank and the HT oil cooler.
    #36
  17. RAZR

    RAZR u may run the risks my friend but I do the cutting

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    before going to all the trouble paying someone to weld you support for saddle bags (i have the Ortlieb Dry Saddlebags) (i used those on my KLR650).
    look at http://www.giantloopmoto.com/

    i have the MoJavi http://www.giantloopmoto.com/products/mojavitm-saddlebag and i plan on buying the Coyote http://www.giantloopmoto.com/products/coyote-saddlebag soon.
    i am also planning on buying the Wolfman number plate bag http://www.wolfmanluggage.com/Enduro/enduro_carryall.html and using my tankbag http://www.wolfmanluggage.com/Tank/explorer_lite.html
    so i think i'm covered when it comes to luggage.... now i need to put it all to use.
    my camp gear is not complete yet.
    i have the REI Dome2. not small, but comfy to store my gear out of the weather. i will probably look for something smaller (packed) and has a vestibule.
    i have a Big Agnes sleeping bag http://www.rei.com/product/763873 and a Thermarest pad http://www.rei.com/product/797486 that slides into the bag.
    i have a air pillow. http://www.rei.com/product/766035
    titanium cook ware from REI http://www.rei.com/product/764178 is what i use to cook with. no need for the set. one is plenty.
    i have the Fozzils plate/bowls http://www.rei.com/product/784601
    i need a new burner because the last one DID NOT pack down small enough and when it was packed down, it would poke through EVERYTHING.
    the MSR SuperFly.
    i am looking at the Snow Peak http://www.rei.com/product/768603
    or the MSR PocketRocket.

    as far as my bike is concerned....

    i have the HT oil cooler (larger oil capacity).
    the Acerbis 6.6 gas tank.
    Guts seat (softer than stock).
    #37
    Im3Wheeln likes this.
  18. Snr Moment

    Snr Moment Unafarkler

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    Enjoying this thread immensely. As I put my rig on its weight loss program, a few things come to light as far as cooking gear, clothing and accessories that add enjoyment to my trips.

    First off, I mostly ride in the Northern Rockies where it's hot during the day and cold at night and early morning. Not uncommon to see 30's/40's to near 100* day time temps. Extra clothing is always an issue, but I deal with that with a combination of wool and tech fabric. My rain gear - Olympia Tourmaster - doubles as an extra outer layer over my seasonal riding gear - Firstgear mesh pants/Rev-it ES jacket with removable liner.

    Problematically, the rain gear takes up a lot of room. It's quality stuff and 100% waterproof, so it's mandatory for me to bring along. Won't take the chance with cheap gear in cold weather because it will fall apart (try it at 31* in West Yellowstone some July morning).

    Sleeping at night requires at least a +20*f bag and I also take a Thermo-Reactor bag liner along. Bag is a Northface Cat's Meow, not down, so it's bigger than I want, but it also spends time on whitewater rafting trips where getting things wet is an issue. Pad is an Insulamat mummy shape and packs down fairly small as compared to a standard Thermarest. No pillow - just use some extra clothes. A word of caution - the Alaska Butt Pad is not recommended as a pillow after a years worth of riding.

    I also fish a lot. The custom fly rod case I made out of plumbing PVC pipe is almost bullet proof, but it weighs a ton. Will be exploring other options as I sit here buried under two feet of snow and ice. I also don't really need to bring the whole fly vest and 200 flies along, so I'll be working on that concept too. All thoughts are welcome.

    Cooking gear is an old MSR white gas stove that has served me well for more than 20 years. The fuel bottles are the problem. Currently suffering from Jetboil envy after riding this summer with people who had them. Am also a coffee junkie, so, with the Jetboil and press kit, I can unload the MSR, fuel bottles and coffee press.

    Lodging is not an issue as I replaced the fiberglass poles on my Eureka Apex with aluminum ones 15 years ago when I was doing a lot of back packing in the mountains. It packs a little bigger than I like, but it's pretty light.

    I've had the Ortlieb's on my bike and liked them a lot. Settled on the hard cases because I can lock them. They also help a lot with leverage to return the bike to an upright position when it is napping. I also carry my extra fuel and a netbook in them (another story).

    Looking forward to more en-lightening info.
    #38
  19. Coopdway

    Coopdway Curiouser Supporter

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    I take pretty much the same stuff if I go for the weekend or a week, big bike or small.

    Helix for a long weekend
    [​IMG]

    TW200 for a week
    [​IMG]

    Duc for 2 weeks
    [​IMG]
    #39
  20. Stu

    Stu Buffo Maximus Supporter

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    You can set up the rear shock to carry nearly anything you can load on the 525. There has been discussion about the strength of the sub frame. I put the Enduro Engineering small rack on the rear. It adds strength to the sub frame. The bike has been upside down sliding on the rack after hitting the ground pretty hard. No issues. I have the same rack on my '09 300 XC-W to use as a grab handle to pull it out of mud bogs. Again, it has scars from numerous rocks and the rack and sub frame (essentially the same as on the 525) are no longer pretty but they are intact. Worry about something important, like carrying beer, but not the strength, weight capacity and durability of the sub frame.

    The Coyote looks like a great bag, BTW.

    On long trips just short shift and keep the revs down. The motor will survive quite nicely. The HT-Racing cooler is, to my mind, a necessary addition to cut down on oil changes, reduce oil heat and to run available 5W-40 synthetic oils.

    Stu
    #40