SMALL bike camping thread

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by RAZR, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. Snr Moment

    Snr Moment Unafarkler

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    Ten days. Almost 3k miles of 2 lane and forest/fire/mountain roads in Western Montana.

    It's not as bad as you think - it's fluffy.:photog

    I have since reduced the pile and more reductions are on the way. That trip was, shall we say, a learning experience. Hence, my interest and participation in this thread.
  2. Mr. J

    Mr. J Banned

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    that's because you paid for some freeloader off the street to dine
  3. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    Neither will cure it completely, but these 2 things help:

    1) Choice of cookware/stove. If you want compact, take a jetboil. They're more rugged than any other ultralight stove. If you want maximum resiliance, steel Trangias the way to go. They are pretty heavy, take a long time to boil water and are quite bulky, but I've never seen a stove that comes close in crash-proofness.

    2) Put the stove* in a bag on top of the seat, rather than on the sides in panniers. Yes, it can still get hit, but it'll get hit less often (unless you always crash by looping the bike!) :D

    *and other fragile stuff, like tent poles.
  4. team ftb

    team ftb Befuddled Adventurer

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    Thaanks CeriJC:D!! I'm not a fan of the cannister stoves like the Jetboil, especially since the cannisters are next to impossible to find where I live. Funnily enough i have a Trangia stove but I actually like the pot-stand capability of my home built alcohol stove a bit better. Luckily the fragility of the stove is not an issue since I store the stove inside the pot. Its my damn pots that are getting squashed inside my GL and DirtBagz luggage.

    As you stated, storing them on top of the seat has increased the survivability..............................................sadly it has not completely solved the issue since I've still managed to damage them:cry.

    [​IMG]

    ....erm...whats my bike doing down there??
  5. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    Have you considered getting stainless steel pots for use with your alcohol stove instead of aluminium ones? If those are SS ones you managed to mash up in that picture I think you might be beyond help! :D
  6. jitterymonkey

    jitterymonkey Been here awhile

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    [​IMG]

    WOW!, If that was Kawasaki green,I'd have never seen it.:lol3
  7. CacheFinder

    CacheFinder n00b

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    I am an ultra-light backpacker so this is really the thread for me. Been all over asia on Honda Cubs and Dreams. Currently have a 185 Twinstar.

    These days I have a biivy and hammock - about 2 lbs total. Then I bring a warm bag and go

    Food-wise, I hate crappy food so... Alcohol fueled (NEVER petrol) "beer-can-stove" it is.

    Absolutely the most reliable stove out there for any weather. My windscreen is just a modified dryer vent from home-cheapo. It all fits around a few japanese lunch pales (the round cute stainless kind you can cook in not just eat out of!)

    Here's a slightly scientific link to the concept of the burner itself: (but the stove is on a reflective surface, it's just 1/2 the size!)
    http://www.jureystudio.com/pennystove/

    Because the cans break after a few weeks of work, and sometimes you need several burners, I bring several beer-can stoves. One is always a fosters-can version. They only weigh a few grams. I also bring 2 dryer vents - everything stacks like russian dolls so two stoves is hardly more than 1, space or size.

    I live next to the Pacific Crest Trail. Literally this is one of the preferred set-ups for people hiking all the way (in one go) form Mexico to Canada. Once you learn to work this stove, you will never go back - that's my prediction. I have about 6 or 7 various gas and mix stoves: They just sit in the garage.

    I have made many can stoves in the field with just a leatherman, but a dremel is super-clean.


    Not only that, but at a few ounces, plenty of room and space for a sun-shower and the most important item... ESPRESSO!

    Would hardly make it up the driveway without espresso.


    [​IMG]
  8. Buddy_Holly

    Buddy_Holly That'll be the day..

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    I like getting my load as light as possible. I use a tarp over the bike and sleep in a bivy- it allows me to eliminate the need for a tent and doesn't feel confined at all, even in the rain. The tarp lets me keep some gear dry and retain some heat from the bike for when I hit the sack- usually right after getting to a camp spot

    <a href="http://s879.photobucket.com/albums/ab353/bh87301/?action=view&amp;current=CAMP3AM02.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/advrider-photobucket-images/images/b/bh87301_CAMP3AM02.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

    For food I get food where I fuel up. In the US there are a lot of options available. Well, OK, a lot is a stretch. But if spending more time riding means I eat a lower quality of food that is cool with me.

    I will be building one of the penny stoves and give that a try. Normally I don't bring a stove.
  9. CacheFinder

    CacheFinder n00b

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    I would love a tank-mounted drinking water holder - any ideas out there? Water is so damn heavy but I'd like to have an on-board tank of 6 quarts or so...

    Anyone?

    :norton:freaky
  10. Stu

    Stu Buffo Maximus Supporter

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    "Tank mounted" could be on top of your gas tank. For that you might look at either the 2 qt. rectangular Nalgene bottles or 1 gal. version and put it in a tank bag.

    If you mean a tank mounted somewhere on the bike then I would suggest something like the 1 gal. Rotopax. They have ones for water, for kerosene and for gas. I take their 1 gal. gas can and it is as tough as the bike. You can mount it in various locations with modifications.

    Stu
  11. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    tank mounted

    step one, buy a cheap magnetic tray
    [​IMG]

    step two, remove magnet from said tray
    [​IMG]

    step three, glue magnet to either neopreme coozy or your travel mug of choice.
    [​IMG]

    step four, enjoy your tank mounted liquid dispenser.
    [​IMG]

    Or just get a camelbak pakteen and strap it wherever you want.
  12. TooTight

    TooTight Adventurer

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    My favorite mode is hammock + tarp + sleeping bag + mosquito net.

    I did two cross US trips this way, plus a trans-Canadian trip.

    Beside the fact that it packs down super-small, it's very versatile. Unlike a tent, you don't need flat ground (a HUGE plus). Unlike sleeping on the ground, it doesn't matter if the ground is wet, hard, etc. It's also bulletproof in a rain storm. Also super quick to set up. These factors make it easy to camp where you never thought possible, like:

    - behind grocery stores
    - golf courses (fore!!)
    - median of interstates
    - between the fire station and city hall, etc.

    Of course, the trick with a hammock is to sleep in it diagonally. I can easily sleep on my side.

    This is the basic set-up, picture taken on a non-motorcycle trip (hence the dog).

    [​IMG]

    Set up under a tractor trailer:

    [​IMG]

    Using some random structure as a shelter, and my tarp as a privacy shield.

    [​IMG]
  13. HaChayalBoded

    HaChayalBoded Brooklyn Bored

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    I can see those ending well.
  14. TRZ Charlie

    TRZ Charlie That's MR. Asshole

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    Yup, that'd be my luck. I'd go to sleep in Arkansas and wake up in NJ....
  15. Northwoods Yeti

    Northwoods Yeti Almost house broken

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    :thumbThat right there is the way to go.

    Went from WI to Cali and back in July of 2005. Northern route out HWY 94 then dropped into Yellowstone then out to the OR coast down HWY 1 to San Fran then back through Yosemite NV,UT,CO,NE,IA. The hottest it got was in Montana at 105, nasty! I would have keeled over if it weren't for the Platypus drinking bag I had stuffed in the left tank pannier and many quarts of gatoraid at gas stops. It could have easily been stuffed in a tank bag. It had a little clip on the end of the house that I could just unclip and drink while on the move. Even had the hose routed up to the handle bars for some stretches.
  16. RAZR

    RAZR u may run the risks my friend but I do the cutting

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    i like the hammock idea, BUT i live in So Cal and most of what i'm riding is the desert....... no trees , very little "structure".
    a friend down here just bought a hammock bag set up and we'll see how his luck is this next year.

    i want to look into the stoves above. i'm still leaning towards MSR petrol stove. since the bike will always have petrol.

    i would maybe be into the tarp/mosquito net set up, but i HATE bugs and they LOVE me. i'm the guy in the morning with all the bites all over my face and my buddies are clean..... laughing at me.:lol3

    i'll probably get the Thermarest "short" (body only) pad. i now have the full length and that adds to packing.



    keep all the ideas coming! especially from the veterans of camping off the bike. :thumb
  17. airborndad

    airborndad Long timer

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    SWEET CHEEKS
    Such a simple and great Idea it's a heavy duty cloth thingy that hold's Two 2-litre soda bottles filled water (or Whatever)
    you put it over your seat so one bottle is on each side and it turns your skinny uncomfortable seat into a wider more tolerable seat check them out @ http://cycle-analyst.com/sweetcheeks.htm
    probably the best $ spent on the bike so far :thumb <!-- / message --><!-- sig -->
    __________________
  18. davsato

    davsato Been here awhile

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    i got one of those drinks tubes that has the universal thread and adaptors that go on any standard soda bottle, nalgene, water bottle etc. i put it on a 2ltr polythene collapsible water bottle and put it in the tankbag, job done. only using water it stays sterile, both have some sort of coating inside.

    2litres is what, about 3.5pints? 1ltr water=1kg, 2.2lb. not sure how big a quart is, is that 2 pints? so 6 quarts will be a big and heavy lump
  19. Ceri JC

    Ceri JC UK GSer

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    I am looking at getting a tiny-packing tent for shorter, more offroad oriented trips. I posted this in my bivvy thread (no response), but thought the audience in this thread might be more interested.

    Has anyone got any experience of the Vaude Power Lizard UL?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drslnUarLr8

    Looks like a more spacious, yet smaller packing version of the Hilleberg Akto or Terra Nova Laser type tents. 35cm x 10cm pack size and only a fraction over 1KG.
  20. TRZ Charlie

    TRZ Charlie That's MR. Asshole

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    That's a nice tent but consider that it has 8 (?) stakes. Here in NW Arkansas (read: rocky as hell) you would be hard pressed to run stakes in the way the guy in the video did. You would also want titanium stakes instead of the wire ones. And you would need a hammer or a near by rock to pound them in.

    I'm lazy so I really don't want to stake out a tent unless the weather warrants. I think the MSR Hubba is a better choice, almost as light and no stakes required unless you feel the need.

    Light is good but what's an extra pound on a bike if it packs small? I think that weighing the features and benefits of each tent you like is the best method of selection otherwise asking for advice on tents is sort of like asking "what's the best oil for my bike". Just sayin...

    For me, ease of pitching (no stakes), the maximum head room in the tent, ability to stand up to the rain and wind and the ability of using the tent for three season usage are the important features. Your needs may vary.