Small wheel scooters and Motorcycle wheel chocks.

Discussion in 'Battle Scooters' started by klaviator, Nov 27, 2019.

  1. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

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    I have always used my truck to haul my scooters and haven't used wheel chocks. I was wondering if there are any issues using wheel chocks designed for motorcycles with small wheel scooters?
    #1
  2. Racerrrx

    Racerrrx Long timer

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  3. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

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    I have a friend who may be buying a Like 150i with 12" wheels. He has a trailer with a chock similar to this:

    [​IMG]

    I told him that I wasn't sure if that would work for that scooter and he may have to use a piece of wood to either put under the wheel or in the front of the chock to keep the wheel from rolling all the way forward. I have never done it myself so that is why I am asking. I think the chock may hit the forks or even brake disc the way it is.
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  4. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

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  5. Racerrrx

    Racerrrx Long timer

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    Yes

    You can also leave the base plate mounted in your truck/trailer and just attach the other parts with R clips (no tools needed). A bit more trip hazard than say a Pitbull strapless stand, but a ton cheaper.
    #5
  6. CaptnJim

    CaptnJim Scooter Pilot

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    I have been using those same chocks for years on a motorcycle and our scoots. I have them mounted in our cargo trailer, with no issue. I was thinking about a Condor chock, when I looked at these. About 80% less $$, and have given us good service. It has worked fine with the tires and wheels on bikes we've owned, from a V-Strom to the 12" wheels of my Vespa.

    I do pull the stand up part out when we aren't actually towing and the cargo trailer is the portable garage for the scoots. (Easier on the shins.) Before I mounted them (semi-permanently) in the cargo trailer, I did use one in the back of my pickup to haul a motorcycle; worked fine.
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  7. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

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    My friend solved this problem by taking an old chock and bending it down so it won't hit the forks. Easy solution!
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  8. cdwise

    cdwise Long timer Supporter

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    We have the Condor scooter chocks designed for smaller wheels.
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  9. tastroman

    tastroman Long timer

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  10. tastroman

    tastroman Long timer

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    If the chock is adjusted correctly the scooter/bike is held up by the chock. I wouldn't want to walk away from it or anything but it will hold well enough to give you time to tie the bike down.
    #10
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  11. Wentwest

    Wentwest How's that work?

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    I've never used any sort of chock. With motorcycles I just hooked the tie-down to the floor loops, ran the front tire against the front wall of the bed and then hooked up the tie-downs to the Canyon Dancer bar sleeves. I held the bike up with one hand and grab the end of a tie-down, get on the bike standing and hooked up the first tie-down, loose but close to right, climb off and grab the other tie-down while holding on to the bars, get on again, hook it up and pull them both tight. With scooters a block of wood between the front tire and the front wall of the bed protects the Tupperware from getting crushed. Once the fronts are tight 2 more tie-downs at the rear finish the job.
    #11
  12. klaviator

    klaviator Long timer Supporter

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    That's fine for a truck. If you have a trailer with no sides you need a chock.
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  13. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    First off, I use a heavy rubber mat in my trucks, the kind made like a tire and ~ 3/8" thick. Properly strapped my GTS will not move even 1/2" if that over thousands of miles with no chock! I know this cause it barely fits in short beds trucks to begin with and very little clearance either end.
    The dealer in Toronto where I bought this 2018 GTS told me to place the front wheel inside a 10" old scooter tire that he obviously was happy to see leave his place. I went along and used it back to KY.
    I actually made a wheel chock for my scooter from plywood and chunks of wood angled for the wheel stop aspect. It's smallish, lightweight and I've never used it as I found it is not necessary.
    On my trailer I use a HF (the cheap version) bolted to the front wood floor as it facilitates one person ride on and then strap down. I can do the scoot in my truck with my wife helping, up the ramp, strap it down too. never tried strapping the scoot alone but probably once up there I could do it too, without a chock using SS.
    I used a chunk of 2x4 screwed into the floor crossways when I bought my 2010 GTS in OH. Took a cordless driver along to facilitate things, dis the same on some MC's too.
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  14. Dark

    Dark Long timer

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    I use the Condor mounted to plywood with 2x arms to slide in to slots. Easy load unload in the bed of my truck. I use 4 tie downs to secure once the scoot is in the chok. I can ride the scoot up in to the Condor, dismount & secure the tie downs by myself.
    [​IMG]
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  15. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    Few late model pick-up trucks allow a scooter in the bed lengthwise unless the tailgates left down, which in my case is a no/go cause I'm towing an RV.
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  16. Dark

    Dark Long timer

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    That is the reason I hang on to my old Tundra
    [​IMG]
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  17. kantuckid

    kantuckid Long timer

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    I had a few of those too, (4 Tundras in fact, a couple with the old, longer beds) but moved on to newer trucks.
    I was trying to be informational, as it were.
    #17
  18. BUZZARD II

    BUZZARD II Old Geezer

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    I have an older Condor chock. I've used it for Vespas too, with a slight modification. The upright V that holds the front of the tire can be unscrewed and set to a lower level. To this add two pieces 2x4 and screw into the lowered V. Set the bottom roll section to the 17" wheel slot. That's it, it's now set for scooter work.

    I glued the 2x4's together to make removal and reinstall easy.
    #18