So we've all heard/seen the 650 xchallenge...let's see your XCOUNTRY!

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by Olas, Dec 3, 2007.

  1. cgguy09

    cgguy09 Scientiæ Cedit Mare

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    + one for the fuel pump. You'll see that as an easy-fail part on a number of threads.
  2. BikerBobber

    BikerBobber Trying to get lost

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    Doubt it's the fuel pump. Not seen many issues with it actually...
    Easy to check. With bike in neutral, turn the key and listen for the pump to cycle on.
    Have you checked all your fuses?

    Bob

    Sent from my mobile
  3. cgguy09

    cgguy09 Scientiæ Cedit Mare

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    eh, worth checking. When I was buying the G650x I saw it noted in a few post. But like Bob said, easy enough to check
  4. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

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    By request-

    BMW G650X swingarm service

    original post 8708



    Okay, coming fresh off the steering head bearing replacement, I tackled the rear swingarm. I may have some experience that will help others doing the same job.

    I had fully expected to find my bearings dry and rusty since there have been accounts of these being not adequately greased at the factory. In fact, with about 24,000 miles on the XCountry, the bearings were very good, soaked with grease and needed no attention.

    Since, I had already purchased all the needed seals, I proceeded to remove and replace all the seals as well as clean out the old grease and re-lube the needle bearings.


    1. Begin by removing the rear wheel and everything attached to the swingarm - cables, wires, chain and sprocket guards etc.

    After doing this, support the rear of the swingarm with something to hold it up.

    Using an Allen bit and extension remove the bolt and nut that holds the lower shock absorber eye on the swing arm. You do not need to remove the shock.

    2. Then, with a hex Allen bit, unscrew the rider's left side swingarm pin from the frame. Note there is a plastic washer or spacer under its head. This pin screws through a flanged inner race and tightens together when this pin is torqued down.

    [​IMG]


    3. Remove the three small screws from the flange of the pin on the right side. Although this pin has a hex recess, it is not screwed into anything but rather presses into the internal race of the needle bearings. There is no tightening torque on this side.

    [​IMG]

    The shoulder of this pin can become corroded/crudded-up and stuck to the frame member bore through which it is inserted before going into the enclosed needle bearing cup on the right side of the swingarm.

    After removing the three small screws, you can turn the pin with a hex drive and hopefully it will break loose and part from the frame a little. It probably will not just come off.

    I then took a sharpened screwdriver are carefully worked it into the crack between the flange and the frame. This moved the flanged pin out enough for me to insert a larger screwdriver. Working the pin with an Allen and gently twisting the screwdriver easily got the pin free from the bike.

    Even better, there is an 8MM threaded hole in the bottom of the hex hole into which you can thread a bolt etc and use a slide hammer etc to simply jerk the pin out if it is tight. Mine was not so tight.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    (remove the outer 3 screws first!)
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    4. Once the two pins are out, you can work the swingarm free.

    [​IMG]

    I was amazed at how light it is, less than 10 pounds total.

    [​IMG]

    My needles looked good with plenty of grease still present.

    [​IMG]


    5. Remove the 2 seals from left side swingarm ear by prying them out with a screwdriver.

    [​IMG]

    This is the plastic washer/spacer and the old outside seal from the left ear. Note the recess into which the plastic washer/spacer fits on the swingarm casting.

    [​IMG]


    6. The right side bearing is in a blind cup since it does not have a through-pin that tightens up on it. Remove the seal from the right side bearing cup.

    [​IMG]

    7. This is everything set out in order of assembly.

    From the picture left to right-

    a. The right side flanged pin with sealing o-ring on it.

    b. The right side inner race that goes into the needle bearing cup and then receives the flanged pin.

    c. The right side seal that seals the right side bearing cup.

    d. The flanged inner bearing race for the left side. Note the black plastic washer/spacer goes under the head of this flange not outside it. I have it sitting on the outside in this pic but it goes under the head of that flange.

    e. The green inside needle bearing seal.

    f. The green outside needle bearing seal.

    g. The outside flanged pin with the black plastic washer/spacer under its head.

    [​IMG]

    8. The bearings are pressed into the swingarm and must be pressed out if they need replacing. Read the service manual about installing new bearings since they must be pressed back in with enough depth to allow for the seals and spacers.

    9. Clean and repack the needles with grease if you are not replacing them. Install new seals. Slip-in the inner races for the bearings being certain to have the plastic washer/spacer UNDER the flange of the inner race for the left side assembly. Also be certain that the plastic washers/spacers fit down into their machined recesses provided in the swingarm casting.

    **********PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO THESE PLASTIC SPACERS ON THE LEFT SIDE. BOTH OF THEM GO UNDER THE HEADS OF THEIR RESPECTIVE FLANGES AND THEY FIT DOWN INTO THE RECESSES IN THE SWINGARM EARS. WORK THE INSIDE WASHER/SPACER INTO ITS RECESS BEFORE INSERTING THE FLANGE INNER RACE INTO THE NEEDLES. THE OUTSIDE IS EASIER TO FIT SINCE YOU CAN SEE IT. *********


    10. Using your swingarm support, work the swingarm back into proper position in the frame, slipping the shock absorber eye back to its slot and aligning the swingarm ears for their respective pins.

    11. The manual says insert the right side pin first but I threaded in the left side a short distance first. I then greased up the right side pin and wiped some anti-seize compound inside the frame bore and inserted the pin into the bearing cup of the swingarm. The manual advised putting thread lock on the three small screws screws of the right side flange.

    12. Install the wheel and chain along with everything that attaches to the swingarm.






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  5. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

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    Also requested-

    From original post 8518

    After 24,000 miles, I have finally replaced my worn steering bearings on my XCountry.

    I’ve read several other accounts of notchy bearings after low mileage. Reasons have been given that allege no or little grease from the factory and/or poor bearing pre-load due to the original set-up or lack of owner maintenance.

    These are tapered roller bearings and the problem is that the rollers can wear into both their inner and outer races and create detent pockets that grab the rollers and try to hold the wheel in the straight-ahead position.<o

    My inner and outer races from the lower bearing that supports most of the bike loading-

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Examining my bearings shows grease from the factory. My lower bearing after removal and its inner race after removing the roller cage-

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Based on this info, I assume my bearings ran loose without proper pre-load and the rollers vibrated around on races creating those scars.


    This is not a step by step guide for doing the replacement but I have, a few tips on removing these bearings.

    The X series bikes are designed different from the GS cousins. They have an all-aluminum triple clamp/steering stem assembly. The stem fits into a clamped receiver in the top bracket and an aluminum stem bolt threads down through the top bracket into the stem. Tightening this bolt pre-loads the bearings. When proper pre-load is obtained, the fork tube and center stem clamps are tightened to hold that pre-load. There are no castle ring nuts or any of that stuff as found on other bikes.

    View of top bracket and center stem bolt. The center stem clamp bolt can also be seen.

    [​IMG]

    Once you have removed the wheel and for tubes, simply loosen the center stem clamp, remove the center stem bolt and drop the stem and lower bracket out. You do not have to remove the handlebars and all the instrument/headlamp assemblies.

    Removing the lower bearing from the aluminum steering stem is the fun part. I used a Dremel tool and cut-off wheel to cut the roller cage and then used a screwdriver to pry it apart.

    [​IMG]

    Once some of the rollers fall out, the cage and remaining rollers fall off and leave only the inner race that must be slipped off its stem boss.

    Follow the factory manual and in spite of anything you see for other bikes (with steel stems), heat the entire lower bracket and stem to 180-200 degrees F. You can use a home oven and the silver bracket paint will not be damaged with this temperature.

    Then, clamp the stem assembly in a protected vise. Having a heat gun or hair dryer to keep heat on the race is also a good idea.

    [​IMG]

    With a suitable tool, you can then drive the inner race off its boss. It will slide under impact without too much trouble. You drive against the little ridge around the race that retains the rollers.

    [​IMG]

    Once off the boss, I cut the race through with my Dremel and wedged-in a chisel to spread the race and allow it to slip over the top boss that’s not as tight of a fit as the bottom.

    [​IMG]

    Use the old split race upside-down as a driving tool to seat the new bearing on the lower boss against the bearing shield cup. This is not difficult.

    [​IMG]

    With the new, greased bearing in place, reinstall the stem assembly to the bike along with the upper greased bearing. You will have two protective shield cups piggybacked on top. Position the upper bracket on the stem and thread in the aluminum center stem bolt and snug it down enough to hold the bearings together for now.

    Install the fork legs and wheel assembly. Tighten the lower clamps on the fork legs but leave the upper bracket fork legs clamps loose for now in order to properly set the bearing pre-load.

    Setting the steering head pre-load:

    The factory manual procedure for setting steering bearing pre-load is to tighten the stem bolt to 20 NM, turn the forks lock to lock a time or two, loosen the stem bolt completely and then torque it back to 5 NM. Then tighten the center stem clamp and fork tube clamps and lastly torque the stem bolt down to 20 NM to secure the stem bolt.

    The time-honored traditional method of steering head bearing adjustment involves tightening the bearings down to put a slight drag on turning the front wheel while elevated and then slackening the stem bolt until the elevated front wheel will just fall from side to side under its own weight once bumped off centerline.

    I tried both methods with the X bike and ended up with a hybrid approach. I am skeptical of simply using a fixed torque number as suggested by the factory manual.

    First, I tightened the stem bolt down to 20 NM and turned the forks lock to lock two or three times to center and seat the bearings. I then loosened the stem bolt and then hand-tightened it with an Allen wrench until my elevated front wheel was hesitant to fall away on its own weight. I then backed the stem bolt out until the wheel would barely just fall away after a nudge from center.

    I then tightened the center stem clamp to 25 NM as well as the 4 upper fork clamp bolts to 25NM and finally went back and tightened the center stem bolt to 20 NM to secure it from backing out.

    After about 500 miles, I will re-set the bearing pre-load and then hopefully be set for many miles.

    ____________

    Steering head bearings are the same sets used on older BMW airheads and other models.

    SKF part number is SKF 320/28 (X or XQ etc) and includes the race, $30-40 each with race from suppliers.
    [​IMG]


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  6. leafman60

    leafman60 Long timer

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    Also from post 8553 XCo thread-


    Another option is to remove the stock preload spacer inside each fork leg. There should be a black plastic spacer under the spring that preloads the stock spring. You can see it in my pics a few posts back.

    You must take the top cap off the rod assembly, remove the spring and the spacer should fall out when you turn the fork upside down. (Be sure to dump the oil out first.) I doubled the length of my spacer to increase the preload and reduce the sag (I'm about 210).

    Trouble is, you need some preload to keep the spring from bouncing around loose in the fork. When you remove the top cap, you'll notice how far the freed spring will pop up and that will give you an idea of minimal necessary preload you need.

    You may be able to replace the stock spacer that I bet is 1 inch with maybe a 1/2 inch piece or maybe just remove it entirely. The spacers are easily made from PVC pipe or fittings.

    If you are getting no sag at all right now and if the spacer is 1-inch, removing it will give you at least 1 inch of sag, probably more. Again, be sure with the spacer removed that you still have to compress the spring a little to get the top cap back on.

    I'm running a little less than 2 inches of laden sag on my XCo front forks and it is working well for me.



    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



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  7. motorrat

    motorrat Been here awhile

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    Thanks!
    Great write-up and very good pics!
    How come the lower triple went dull?
    About greasing up the bearings, I saw the Hyperpro guys doing it by adding a spoonfull of grease to their palm, and putting the the bearing around their opposite pointing finger, loading it with grease by scooping and rotating it.
  8. Dutchgit

    Dutchgit Completely clogless

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    The way they do it at Hyperpro is the way I learned it as well. That way you force the grease into the bearing. Just coating the outside may not be enough.
  9. hankamy

    hankamy n00b

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    Thanks for all the replies. I can hear the pump, the fuses are ok, and the battery is in good shape. This is why I believe the problem is somewhere between the kill button and whereever it leads. Is there a diagram that shows me the kill button and its wiring? Thanks mucho.
  10. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool Super Supporter

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    The wiring diagrams were a separate REPROM disc that you could buy from BMW. These are no longer available.

    There is a crappy copy floating out on the web on a german website that might help. Google shoukd be able to find it.

    Unplug the switch and meter it out to see if you have a bad switch.
  11. Sh4ft

    Sh4ft Beater

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    I have the PDF copies, PM me for a link

    EDIT. Here are the manuals:
    Here are links to the RepROM and wiring diagrams applications. They are hosted on Google Drive and are zipped - use the download link at the top of the screen (downward facing arrow) to download.

    Both applications are for Windows only but I was able to run the wiring diagram application via Wine on Linux, the RepROM application did not run under Wine.

    Before I ran either executable, I checked the entire directory structure of both apps for malware with both ClamAV and Microsoft System Endpoint Protection, you should check using your anti-malware software as well.

    2007 BMW (all models) Wiring Diagrams application ISO, 3.1MB
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B02RRW-FoHivY1Y3MnNobUcyOXc
    Unzip and burn .iso file to a CD/DVD or use something like daemontools to mount locally, run SLP.exe
    Windows 8 and above can mount the .iso natively, unzip and right-click on file

    2007 BMW (all models) Wiring Diagrams application local folder version, 3.1MB
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B02RRW-FoHivQlR0QzBOQzlRMjg
    Unzip (will create a folder called SLP-CD 2.2) and run SLP.exe

    2007 G650X Repair Manual - RepROM, 187MB
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B02RRW-FoHivQUhqUUNIY3F2YUE
    Unzip and burn .iso file to a CD/DVD or use something like daemontools to mount locally, run RepROM.exe
    Windows 8 and above can mount the .iso natively, unzip and right-click on file

    md5sums:
    b640156e435bfddbf14e2400818066c1 BMW_2007G650X_Repair_Manual.iso.zip
    9e2ae34ca400a1ed7f19e6eacae3ea47 BMW_Motorrad_1993-2008_Wiring_Diagram.iso.zip
    df098d4563bc1ea133f27c118d74f5ce BMW_Motorrad_1993-2008_Wiring_Diagram.zip
  12. hankamy

    hankamy n00b

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    Received, Sh4ft. Thanks. From the looks of it, I may have bitten off more than I can chew. The manual for open heart surgery may be easier to understand.
  13. Bli55

    Bli55 -

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    Is the leaking gone then?

    On my X-Challenge I swapped out the water pump seals (even double lipped non-OEM ones!) and shaft, but I still got the occasional drop out of the weep hole...
    There is no way it could account for loss of coolant from the overflow reservoir!! Is anyone else having to top it off regularly?
  14. Zeus99

    Zeus99 Been here awhile

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    What's the normal voltage?
    Mine is always showing around 13.5 V.

    I'm thinking about putting on some heated grips and a couple of fog lights.
    But I remember reading somewhere that the bike has a very low electricity output and that it could be an issue.

    Any thoughts on that?
  15. Zeus99

    Zeus99 Been here awhile

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    Bli55 yes, the leaking is all gone.
    It seems to me that the bike is finally quirks free :D
    Are you sure your leak is on the gasket? My skid plate had a pretty obvious wet area from the leaking pump.


    On a completely different note.......
    Does anybody have a good site, youtube channel or something with good tips/tutorial for a beginner off road rider?
  16. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool Super Supporter

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    13.5V is fine. It will depend on the battery, but between 13V and 14V is normal.

    Heated grips and a couple of fog lights will be fine for the electrical capacity of the bike.

    For beginning off road riding, check out Jimmy Lewis on youtube:

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

    <iframe width="560" height="315" src="" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
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  17. tbarstow

    tbarstow Two-wheelin' Fool Super Supporter

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    Some of the X bikes suffered from a warped inner clutch housing, #1 in the fiche here. If you have the warped clutch housing, you will always have a water pump leak.
  18. Zeus99

    Zeus99 Been here awhile

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    Oh yeah!
    Thanks tbarstow! :)
  19. Dutchgit

    Dutchgit Completely clogless

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  20. cgguy09

    cgguy09 Scientiæ Cedit Mare

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    Good vids!