So you ride a pushie hey - The Aus Bicycling Thread

Discussion in 'Australia' started by clarky, Dec 27, 2009.

  1. Marcbar

    Marcbar Been here awhile

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    Unless you plan to start racing you won't need to get the really good stuff.
    There are quite a few guys in my club now riding Meridas and are all very happy with them.
    One of the guys is an x Vic Junior Champ and he loves the Merida.
    The 903 has everything you need on it.
    My son rides a Cervello and with race wheels we're talking $8500. but he is a very competitive racer and needs the top end stuff to be there at the finish.
    #61
  2. lentil

    lentil King of the Dad Joke and Senior Status Legume Super Moderator

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    Thanks yeah I think thats the way I will go or there is a giant bike that has reasonable value for money as well!!

    Will let you know how I go!
    #62
  3. Lupine128

    Lupine128 That's MR Band Aid!

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    i'm a mechanic at one of the CBD stores.
    we deal mostly in giant an scott.
    few little things to consider when you go to drop your cash.

    number one, pick a shop that will spend the time to fit you to the bike properly.
    we get a couple of people a day who come in with bikes that don't fit. they were sold what was in store, not what was right.

    number two, get a bike that suits what you do for most of your riding. just like a moto, if you do 99% of your riding as commuting/road touring and 1% as off road, you don't buy a dirt bike. have a look at good quality flat bar road bikes for commuting, but a good entry level road bike will commute very well.

    number three, get a good groupset, not a great one. unless you are planning on competeing on a regular basis, don't worry about 105 or ultegra groupsets. they are 10 sp and will wear a lot quicker than a good Tiagra groupo which is 9. 9 speed runs a thicker chain, with a bigger gap between each sprocket. it's less prone to losing tune due to minor bumps or cable stretch.

    number four, go back and see number one. if it doesn't fit right, then no matter how good a deal you get it will be worthless to you.

    a bit on bikes themselves. this might sound a bit like a sales pitch, but after 20 odd years servicing and selling bikes, everything i say ends up sounding like that.
    we stock giant because we get the best value for money with them.
    as a company they manufacture the alloy frames for 27 other brands including all of trek, specialised, gt, mongoose, christ knows who else. means that as far as warrenty goes, they are pretty much the only one offering a life time warranty on frames that isn't going through a third party. also means that they tend to run complete groupsets not a mishmash.
    if the cranks and hubs aren't shimano, and the bike is costing you less than $2K new, you are gettin cheap parts. prime suspects are FSA and Bontrager for cranks, and bontrager and formula for hubs and wheels. bontrager wheels are crap, and i have to deal with at least 2 people a week who are finding that out.
    make sure you are getting shimano chain/cassette as well. try and avoid SRAM/Shimano combo's. sometimes they work well, but generally they are a little ragged. all shimano, or all SRAM. but under $1500, it'll be shimano.

    if you are looking at alloy frame, carbon forks and post, full tiagra groupset, shimano R500 wheelset, under $1500, buy a giant defy 1.
    lifetime warranty on frame and fork and without doubt the best value entry roadie we've carried and we were a dealer for merida and other brands for about 5 years.
    anyway, end of sales rant.
    have alook round, find something that YOU like, and feel free to PM or email me with any questions about anything. if you don't know, ask.
    hope this helps.

    oh, and the PM/email thing goes for anyone on here who needs a hand with pushy stuff.
    #63
  4. lentil

    lentil King of the Dad Joke and Senior Status Legume Super Moderator

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    Thanks Mate I just went to the Motorbike/pushbike shop here in town they know me well My DR has funded their last three staff Christmas parties and Senior management Holidays

    so they are happy to spend some time with me setting up the bike

    they just offered me a defy 1 for 1250 I may end up going that way !

    Now the farkling begins my list so far:

    Bike
    Helmet
    Shoes
    toolbox
    Speedo with cadence
    Drink Bottle & cage

    Knicks
    Shirt
    Gloves


    Pump for at home

    Light
    #64
  5. Lupine128

    Lupine128 That's MR Band Aid!

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    That's a pretty good price. List is $1499, so $250 off isn't bad at all.
    Cadence is cool and all, but really more useful when on serious training. A good wireless computer with average speed, max speed, trip, odo and clock will sort the casual punter for ages. And shiny shiny computers with cadence and heartrate and elevation and whatall make great Christmas/Hannuka gifts.
    All the rest is good. Your arse will thank you forever for getting good quality knicks. Remember, just the knicks, no underwear. If you are self conscious, throw some shorts on to cover the shame.
    A good track pump is invaluable. Your tyres need around 100-120psi in them and will go well below 80 in just a couple o days. And a good track pump you'll use all the time on the moto as well.
    Bottle cages and bidons and the rest you'll collect over time.
    Shoes will start around $140. The defy 1 comes with shimano 540 pedals and cleats so a decent set of shoes is all you need at that end. Try shimano r076 or similar. Practise gettin out of your pedals away from prying eyes and pointing fingers. You are going to fall over at least once because you forget you're clipped in, you don't want to do it infront of 200 catholic schoolgirls. Once you get used to them you'll never even think about you pedals and clipping in. Make sure the shop backs the pedals off for you, and fits yellow tip cleats or it'll be even funnier for the schoolgirls.
    Other than that, spend what you can on a good helmet.
    All helmets have to pass Australian standards but as you spend more you better venting and inmoulding. Just like your moto, your head is supposedly important. Look after it.
    Speaking of which, make sure it goes back for it's first service. Take your warranty book. Keep everything so if anything does go wrong, giant have the easiest time doing a warranty. The reps here are great and actually gomou of their way to help us with warranties.
    That's it. Now just rise the thing.
    #65
  6. cautiousbob

    cautiousbob struggling along

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    hey lupine,

    i have read with interest your recent comments. i have big fat plastic flat pedals (on my mountain bike) which i find very comfortable, and i like the idea of being able to put my feet out whenever. my friends are starting to give me a hard time about them and all swear by cleats. i am considering investing in some.

    do you have any recommendations for pedals that can accommodate cleats and also regular shoes. i ride on the weekends a lot with my wife and kids (ages 3,6 & 8) and i like the ability of wearing thongs on a casual sunday cruise around town.

    we bought my wife a new mtb last week. she got a merida matts 600. we live near heaps of trails so she wanted something to take into the woods a bit and also ride around town. we bought it from one of the big bike shops in chermside and they were very helpful with everything. we also bought the young bloke a 'netti my bike' which is one of those plywood bikes with no pedals. highly recommended by me, the little fella hasn't let go of it for a week...
    #66
  7. theMISSIONARY

    theMISSIONARY hunting and riding!!

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    Here is what you want from Shimano

    http://bike.shimano.com/publish/content/global_cycle/en/us/index/products/pedals/mountain.html

    I use an older model that has an Aluminium cage with a single sided cleat so they can be used with "Normal" shoe's or "proper" shoe's only down side's are they are not totally flat on the cleat side and they tend to flop to the heavy(cleat)side so it can be a pain to clip in(newer models seem to all be double sided)......don't really like cleats but i give them a run now and then
    #67
  8. Lupine128

    Lupine128 That's MR Band Aid!

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    Shimano make couple of good pedals one is the 324 and the other is the 530. Both are a SPD cleat on one side and a platform or cage on the other. The 530 is a great pedal with a wide, deeply dished plaform side that isn't to sharp.
    The down side of single sided pedals is that the compromise between the flat and cleat means you are always going to be hunting the cleat side.
    That can get really annoying.
    I've been riding clipped for so long that I can't ride without any more.
    I was a messenger for 22 years off and on, the last 6 in Brisbane, and can honestly say I don't actually remember the last time i thought of clipping in or out of my pedals.
    If you take the time and make the effort to switch to clip in pedals you'll find you produce much more power, off road you'll have a lot more control and it will make you quicker.
    MTB pedals are a LOT easier to get in and out of than road pedals, and the shoes don't make you look like some mutant duck when you walk. When I was working I used to be able to wear my shimano shoes for 10 hours a day, ride 80+K's a day and run about 10 in them, and a pair would last me around 12 months. That would equate to around 15 years of punter use. Good value for money.
    #68
  9. Lupine128

    Lupine128 That's MR Band Aid!

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    A few of you already know I work at bike and cycle obsession in the city.
    It's the one with the strom parked on the footpath out front.
    I'm there from 08:30-18:00 mon-fri.
    If any of you need a hand with cycling stuff drop on by and say hi.
    You'll get a welcome ranging from long lost brother to fuck off cnut depending on the day I'm having and my muppet tolerance at the time, but chances are I'll at least say hi.
    Just be aware I've been described as somewhat like House, but without the social graces, so you take your chances :)
    #69
  10. petelford

    petelford foreveryoung

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    PM Sent
    #70
  11. The Mass

    The Mass Timbuktu or Bust... Both!

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    I do the commute nowadays into the city (Perth) about 20km each way.
    The bike I am riding I bought for a grand in 1989 with 105 componentry.
    Just like the grandfather's axe, four wheelsets and on the second set of components (shimano 600) with just over a hundred thousand kliks and still going strong. So twenty years on it looks like a piece of crap with a steel frame (actually it is) especially with brighrt pink forks from my 90's triathlon bike - BUT no one in the city is going to steal it :wink:
    I run a 6 volt SLA battery (in the winter) powering two Halogen lights. I have found that cage drivers recognise LED lights as a bicycle and take no notice, but the with the Halogens - they give way everytime :thumb
    Obviously, with the steel frame and SLA battery I am not too concerned with the weight side of things (it is all training) because the afternoon (every afternoon in Perth) wind makes it a hard slog for every bike regardless of weight. :baldy
    #71
  12. kapitaal

    kapitaal Lost

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    Here's a few shots of me riding the highand fling last year. I only did the half which was 60km but have signed up for the Capital Punishment 100km in May...it's gunna hurt big time...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    #72
  13. kapitaal

    kapitaal Lost

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    #73
  14. Phunkshun

    Phunkshun ...Uh....yeah....right???

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    MTB is more my style but i still ride them on the road, one of the bikes is a Giant AC more DH/Freeride, setup soft and i have a DMR Trailstair that is a single speed with Marzocchi JnrT on it fun and loose with only a rear break:clap
    #74
  15. Dr AT

    Dr AT Long timer

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    Ok, so we've hijacked a few threads, perhaps it's time to talk about the ultimate training tool - mountain bikes?

    I'll start with about the only usefull thing I've learned https://www.bikeexchange.com.au

    If you don't want / need the latest graphics then searching for last years model can save you a fortune - especially at the pointy end of the market.

    So, time for you guys to teach.

    Where's the best alpine resort for lazy people to get a gravity hit?

    Any good venues for taking kids ? ( Intermediate level , my 12 yo has a specialised fsr but the younger two just have hard tails)

    So, ebikes....is pedal assist ok at mtb tracks? ( aka how do I keep up with my 12 yo)
    #75
  16. DOT

    DOT Ready Aye Ready Supporter

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    :lurk
    #76
  17. AUSSIEADV

    AUSSIEADV 2wo left foots

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    It's imperative to do what we can to keep fit the older we get. My work was keeping me pretty fit but this year it has dropped off so maybe a mountain bike is the ticket to maintain some fitness. There is a mountain bike park in Beechworth which I haven't seen as yet and some great riding out in the bush.

    A budget but decent bike would be the ticket so if anyone has links to good value bikes can they post some links?
    #77
  18. MacMan

    MacMan Been here awhile

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    I'm cycling again after a long layoff. I have a mate who's been up to Mt Beauty lately to race in the gravity enduro scene. I'll ask him and post back.
    #78
    AUSSIEADV likes this.
  19. MacMan

    MacMan Been here awhile

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    Follow up:

    "Buller is the go for sure. Reasonably tame so long as you stay away from the downhill trails. The chairlift there only services the downhill trails. By nature, the alp resorts require a fair bit of pedaling. The Buller village is central. There's a pump track in the middle of the village - good for kids. They also have shuttles from the bottom to top." See: bike.mtbuller.com.au
    #79
  20. winna

    winna Rallye bikes rule

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    Great idea mate, we (Poppy, Micmen and Digga) have just started riding mountain bikes for fitness and ease of use compared to gearing up for a motorbike ride.
    I have found the best source for tracks is the app 'Trailforks', it has every track in Australia, with colors for levels of difficulty, absolutely brilliant.
    Poppy and I ride Nerang Forestry, we haven't even scratched the surface with all the tracks there, let alone all the others within a short drive.
    Another app is 'Track My Ride", great for watching your fitness improve over a short time too.
    #80
    BygDaddee and GelandeRoadie like this.