Solo Cross Country On A Scooter :-)

Discussion in 'Americas' started by Sbless, Mar 31, 2016.

  1. BirddogVet

    BirddogVet Anticipating... on the road again.

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    Ditto to what most of the above have already stated. In short, "less is more." And save your money. Thrift stores can carry great finds.

    Eddie Otto completed an Iron Butt on a scooter. Great idea, especially if you can keep the weight down.

    Starting from San Fran. makes sun glasses an absolute must. I would head north weather permitting, to avoid the sun. This would allow for a clockwise continental exploration. Once on the Atlantic Coast, you could then "Go West; start early." Recommended reading from 'How to Walk Across America," by Tyler Coulson.

    Route 50 is considered the loneliest road across America with lots to see and explore.
    Looking forward to reading of your adventure.
    #41
  2. Little Bike

    Little Bike Air/Clutz Sue Supporter

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    Somewhere on adv there is a ride report by a newly graduated high school kid who rode his scooter from Thousand Oaks, ca to New York. Great read.
    #42
  3. Trip Hammer

    Trip Hammer It's not the years, it's the mileage Supporter

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  4. Little Bike

    Little Bike Air/Clutz Sue Supporter

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    Good find!

    I would skip the gas stoves and get an Esbit (available at REI, online, military surplus). Dirt cheap, tiny, nothing to go wrong (uses tablets), and fuel planning is guess free (just pack the number of tablets you'll need).

    You might check out the books about prep for hiking the Pacific Crest Trails, lots of great info on packing light and small. Google light weight backpacking.
    #44
  5. Roadscum

    Roadscum Long timer

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    Sarah, it sounds like you've a wonderful adventure ahead of you. May I suggest you plan to visit some of the national parks, especially Yellostone and the Grand Canyon(North rim if possible), they are very very special places. If your schedule permits consider a trip down to Key West Florida. It's a wonderful 128 mile ride from the Florida mainland, island hoping over blue carribean waters down to Key West. The ride over the Seven Mile bridge is spectacular and almost spiritual if done at sunrise or sunset. Florida state campgrounds are located alomg the way at Long Key: (https://www.floridastateparks.org/park/Long-Key) and at Bahia Honda: (https://www.floridastateparks.org/park/Bahia-Honda)

    An electric jacket liner is something you may want to consider, it can get cold at night and in high elevations, and in wet weather. Having the E. liner will allow you to minimize the amount of warm clothing you carry, and when you keep the body core warm the hands and feet will also stay warm.

    On my Vespa 300 I have installed a cigarette lighter socket in the left side knee pad(from Scotterwest) to power a GPS and to double as a USB charger with the appropriate adapter. I also run an SAE connector and a coax connector directly from the battery to exit at the front of the seat. The coax powers the E. jacket liner and the SAE is for a battery charger or USB(with appropriate adapter). Cabling and adapter are available from Powerlet: http://www.powerlet.com/shop-by-product/power-cables/PWRCBL
    If you're on a Vespa Scotterwest is a great resource for new/used Vespa's, service, parts, and accessories. http://www.scooterwest.com/

    I'm on the gulf (west) coast of Florida just below Sarasota, if you get down this way give me a ping.

    How long do you expect to be on the road and when do you plan to begin your wonderful adventure?

    Paul
    #45
  6. RNMedic

    RNMedic Adventurer

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    subbed
    #46
  7. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way... Supporter

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    I used the coleman 442 for years and found it excellent and bombproof. But I've since changed to the MSR pocket rocket stove for motorcycle travel. It is super efficient, fast, compact, light and very efficient. You don't need the advantages of a white gas stove for a trip like this. I also never felt good about putting a gas filled stove in a bag with my clothing or food. The MSR is very fast and very controllable. The fuel canister cannot spill or smell up your other gear. My other stoves never see the light day anymore.

    [[​IMG]
    #47
  8. Zubb

    Zubb he went that-a-way... Supporter

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    And, since space is a premium... I replaced insulation layers with an electric vest and never tour without it. However, you can also wear your rain jacket under your armored jacket. This will add quite a lot of warmth. Of course the best case scenario is an armored touring jacket vs a riding jacket. The Kilimanjaro is designed for ALL conditions and maximum flexibility. It's one of the very best "values" out there. Mine is about 12 years old and has seen every weather condition imaginable. It has been crash tested at 40, 55 and 90 mph including one deer strike. The only reason I've retired it is because it look fairly ratty now, and there is a little bit of stitching starting to pull out from abrasion.

    Kudo's to you for living an adventurer's lifestyle. Take a million pics, and share a few with us daily if you can!
    #48
  9. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    The Aprilia has larger diameter wheels than most. A real plus in my book. They handle better.
    Don't buy an inexpensive (cheap) Chinese manufactured scooter unless it has a stellar reputation. For the same money you could buy a Yamaha TW200 or something similar.
    #49
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  10. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    We've perfected our upper clothing to:
    Fully vented jacket with liner
    Heated jacket
    Rain suit, or jacket/pants

    For lower we use exclusively leather riding pants with armor (not knee sliders)

    Feet get SIDI boots, rain proof.

    Head gets a FLIP or Modular helmet. It's a compromise on protection but friendly to others.

    Gloves you probably need two kinds. Lightweight touring with good knuckles and something warmer and rain proof.

    All well tested, (google 'hit a cow in baja')

    We've tried every stove there is. MSR Pocket Rocket is our favorite. Actually I like Propane stoves better but the canisters are too big.
    #50
  11. Little Bike

    Little Bike Air/Clutz Sue Supporter

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    I have a gifted used Kilimanjaro that I probably won't use - need to check the size. Send me a pm if you're interested.
    #51
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  12. boatpuller

    boatpuller Long timer

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    Best of luck on your adventure. It sounds marvelous.
    One trick I'm going to try on my upcoming AK trip is to bring a tarp to put over the tent. Keeps tent dry for easy morning breakdowns, provides dry place to erect the tent in evening rain, and can provide shelter for outside the tent. Kelty makes a very popular one.
    #52
  13. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    I have a Kelty shelter. The challenge is erecting it. You need at least two poles or something to tie it to. I still haven't gotten it down pat. I think it's a pain but the Mrs likes it. It is nice if you can tie it over a picnic table for sunshade or rain cover. We used it as a rain cover in Dawson City and it was awesome....we made a few friends! Somewhere to sit outside yet be dry.
    #53
  14. gbmaz

    gbmaz Power Newb Supporter

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    #54
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  15. Sbless

    Sbless Adventurer

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    I have officially put in my notice at work!!!

    I have my plane ticket purchased to San Francisco for the 22nd of next month. I suppose this will thread will peter out here before long, as I will start up a new one under the trip report section. Once I do so I will put a link in here if anyone wants to follow along :-)

    Thank you to all who have been posting all of these amazing tips, tricks and words and encouragement :clap
    I am forever grateful:-)
    #55
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  16. Downs

    Downs KK6RBI

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    Please do. Or admin might be able to move this thread to the trip section :)
    #56
  17. Sbless

    Sbless Adventurer

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    Okay folks! I have a new question. :D

    I have all the way to Grand Junction, CO figured out(ISH), and now I am trying to plan how quickly I want to head south (thinking of trying to get to New Orleans, and debating on including Denver, CO area into my route...). Anyone have any 'don't miss this road' roads to tour on in Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico or Texas?

    Any tips would be amazing! :happay

    (15 days left on the Island until I am back on the mainland!!!)

    All the good vibes and smiles,
    -Sarah
    #57
  18. XXMe

    XXMe Not my picture

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    All I can say is the Greater Denver area is extremely busy/crowded!

    There are times that you can't get into Denver from the mountains and other times you can't get into the mountains from Denver!

    Hopefully a local will be along to explain it.... I just try to avoid it if I can!

    Edited to add that there's a lot to see in Southern CO and Northerrn NM before having to tolerate the Great Flatness. But that's just my opinion...
    #58
  19. Sbless

    Sbless Adventurer

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    I totally hear you, I lived in CO for 5 years, and going to Denver was always a pain! BUT, all of the wonderful towns on the outskirts make it worth it :-)

    That's my debate, if I just head south from Grand Junction, I can get right into some awesome roads... So we will see!

    -Sarah
    #59
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  20. TUCKERS

    TUCKERS the famous james

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    You could take 50 out of GC. Stay on that or take 550 (Million Dollar Highway) then 160.
    Kansas, h'mm not many winding roads there.
    New Mexico...stay on 550 out of Durango.
    Red Rock Canyon State Park in OK is ok, but a big detour for such a short nice road.
    TEXAS, it's a ways down to Hill Country or Big Bend.
    Did you find a Piaggio BV200?....nice scooter...16" wheels. Hard bag options.
    Invest in the MAPQUEST Atlas book. Scenic roads are marked, and if you get the Large Scale/ Large Print version it's easy to read. It's a big book at 11"X15" but it's all you'll ever need.
    For a half decent FREE mapbook go to any KOA Campgroud and get their book, it's small, quite useful and FREE.
    #60
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