Solo from CT to Tuk and Deadhorse in 2020

Discussion in 'Americas' started by CavReconSGT, Nov 23, 2019.

  1. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    TKC80s don't have particularly robust carcasses. I've never had an issue with one, but if you're looking for a durable tire in those conditions on a loaded up bike that far away from everything, there are better options in my opinion.
    #21
  2. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil. Supporter

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    There might be but I can't run the MotoZ on my bike. I was thinking of them as an alternative to the K-60's but would still probably switch to the TKC-80's up there but haven't been able to try them because of size issues. What are the tires you think are a better option? That is why I have this thread. I am looking for other opinions and first hand experience.

    KR
    #22
  3. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    Ah, I see you've got the 17" rear so the MotoZ are out. If I were in your shoes, I'd go for a set of Mitas E07s. I've not used them myself, but based on everything I read it's the tire I'd choose for that trip. They were actually my first choice for my AK trip, but they stopped making them in the rear size for my bike, so I went with the GPSs. I'd expect them to get similar kind of mileage.

    You said TKC80s wear out in about 3000 miles (I've had the same experience). Well, Whitehorse to Tuk, to Deadhorse, and back to Fairbanks is about 3,000 miles... you see the issue, I'm sure... There are a number of ways you can play with the logistics to make that work more in your favor (like putting them on yourself in Dawson), but the last thing I want to be worrying about on a trip is tire logistics unless I absolutely have to. Using a TKC80 rear anywhere in the middle like that commits you to 2 tire changes to worry about. You've got lots of time so maybe it doesn't bother you, but I'd rather be having a drink at the Westminster Hotel than spooning on a tire.

    You're in a slightly different situation than I was - I knew my trip was going to be around 10kmi, I had very limited time to do it, and I'd heard enough reports of the GPSs (ditto E07s) lasting about that long that I made no plans to change it, but knew that if I needed to I would just do it in Calgary or someplace in the US on my way back home. Between your start point, the amount of time you have, and your plan to go for Tuk and Deadhorse means your trip will be more miles than mine, and I think it'd be wise to anticipate having to change at least the rear. I don't know what's on your bike now (or rather, what will be when you depart), but I think the ideal situation would be ride it as is to Whitehorse, have a set of E07s put on there, and then not worry about tires for the rest of your trip.

    I would HIGHLY recommend when you get up there to let the weather dictate your route (it sounds like you're planning on this already). Doing that can mean knowing where/when your stops are can be hard to judge. Anyway, my point is I had planned to do Tuk first, but the weather sucked so I headed to AK from Dawson City first. If I had put on a TKC80 or similar in Whitehorse on my way up, it would have been whooped long before I got back to Dawson. My GPS had almost 6,000 miles on it before I headed up the Dempster, and it was just fine.
    #23
  4. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil. Supporter

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    Interesting. So you would ride the E07's up to Deadhorse? I will look more at the E-07 instead of the K-60's. I have looked before but have never used them and I was going with the devil I know rather than the one I don't.

    I was thinking that exactly. Riding the K60's to Whitehorse and changing to the TKC-80s. Riding to Tuk and then Deadhorse and then probably switching back to something like the K-60's for the trip back. I'm not sure how much tire I will have left by the time I get to Whitehorse so that will partially depend on what I do in Fairbanks when I get back from Deadhorse. I may drag the K-60's from Whitehorse to Fairbanks if there is enough meat on them. If not I'll probably pick up a new pair in Fairbanks.

    KR
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  5. 95Monster

    95Monster Long timer

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    I rode on EO7+ from Lake George, NY to Calgary. Mounted another set in Calgary (Blackfoot Motorsports) and rode the Dempster & Dalton. Mounted fresh EO7s in Fairbanks (Outpost Alaska) for the ride south. I found K60's to be awful but liked the EO7's a lot. My new favorite is the Dunlop Trailsmart Mission. I have over 6000 miles on my rear and my throttle hand is pretty heavy. Bike is a R1200GS. Time of year was mid to late June.

    U.S. 2 could be the most boring road in the Americas;)
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  6. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    I've not ridden to Deadhorse, so I can't speak from experience, but based on everything I've read the condition of the Dalton is generally better than the Demspter, weather aside. In other words, any tire that will do the Dempster will do the Dalton, and I'd not hesitate to roll an E07 up the Dempster. Hell, if it's dry the whole way up you could do the Dempster on a regular street tire.
    #26
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  7. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    Up until Atigun pass Dalton is 50% paved what makes it easier and harder that there are a) more different surface types to deal with b) trucks.

    Besides dust whiteout there are blind corners, several where they have take the whole road and they cannot stop. Best strategy to go there on Friday there will be very few of them on weekend.

    With regards to surface unlike Dempster where they only have calcium chloride on few newer sections (most noticeably north of Arctic circle to/with downhill to NWT) on Dalton calcium chloride is everywhere and it's like soap when it gets wet.
    #27
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  8. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil. Supporter

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    Thanks for the information. Love your handle by the way.

    KR
    #28
  9. cyclopathic

    cyclopathic Long timer

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    Except people PMing me trying to sell pot
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  10. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil. Supporter

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    :lol3
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  11. 'Bob'

    'Bob' Been here awhile Supporter

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    Just thought I'd throw up a couple pics FYI. Here's the K60 after about 6000 miles and a headlight/oil cooler guard I tabbed up as I
    lost the OEM one on a FSR:
    IMG_2185.JPG IMG_2186.JPG

    I found I needed both a 60/40 tire and glass/oil cooler protection as the road construction in Northern BC and Yukon goes on for miles. This means highway speeds are resumed on loose crushed stone after you get past the construction crews. For this reason alone I wouldn't go north of Hwy 7 on the Alcan on street tires if you plan to maintain highway speeds in the loose stone.

    Also, if you've never been, the way they surface roads due to frost up there is to lay down sequential layers of tar and crushed stone and let the traffic wear it in. Then they brush off any loose stuff and paint the lines. This means the shoulders can be iffy as they never get packed in, and the troughs in the road are the opposite of what we have down South... there are low points where water builds up BETWEEN the automobile tires (i.e., under vehicles) as that stuff is softer, not as worn in by traffic, and gets brushed off.
    Same with the centre line, that don't get as worn in so gets brushed deeper and is lower than the harder packed vehicle tire tracks too. Not a big deal, but you won't want to spend much time on the centre line in the wet and stay off the white shoulder lines in corners as well.

    Regarding the Dempster, especially the NWT part... long haul truckers told us the NWT does not have a good road maintenance budget, so they grade the loose stone that was spun off onto the shoulders back onto the road to 'resurface' it. This reclaimed stone has all the binding material worn/washed out of it so the recycling process is endless as it gets spun off the road quickly when the binder is degraded.

    What does this mean for riders? Well, we noticed that the road from Inuvik to Tuk followed the lay of the land which meant lots of dips and turns. (It would be a world class motorcycle road if it was ever paved, but we're told it never will be.) Most vehicles fear the outside corners due to the above mentioned loose stone so most of them hug the inside corners as less vehicle movement. This means they they take the left hand corners on the wrong side of the road as most of the loose stone is spun off to the right side of the left handers, and the left side of the right hand turns.

    This traffic pattern means you will likely encounter a vehicle on 'your' side of the road as you take a right hand corner as it's usually nice and smooth on the 'inside', and it also means you will end up in several inches of loose gravel if you try to stay on your 'own' side of the road in left hand corners.

    What to do? Well, luckily the traffic is not that heavy yet so you can usually read the dust plumes for oncoming traffic and decide if you can take that left hander on the wrong side of the road before an oncoming vehicle gets there, and conversely if you can anticipate meeting a vehicle on 'your' side of the road as you enter a right hand corner. You really really don't want to be caught out in the deep loose stone on a corner and neither does an oncoming vehicle.

    Most of the locals are really tuned into this traffic pattern and can do it fairly safely. Locals usually slow down for oncoming traffic anyway to save their windshields and they'll usually give you a little wave if you slow down a bit too.

    Unfortunately tourists and folks in rented vehicles don't know or don't care and don't slow down for oncoming traffic so watch for them on the straights and in the corners. While you'll find these conditions everywhere on the Dempster, they are most notable between Inuvik and Tuk and the etiquette there was to slow down and give a polite wave if the oncoming vehicle did the same.

    As usual YMMV.
    #31
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  12. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil. Supporter

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    The K-60's I had, had never gotten to that mileage before I had to get rid of them so I didn't actually know how long they would go. I am starting to lean more towards the E-07. I have seen some reviews as well as some of what people on this thread have said that make me think this is a tire I'd like to try.

    I have protection on my headlights and radiator and have since I started riding my bike. I find that protection as well as my skid plate and crash bars to be very useful to say the least. I also have added a camel tank that increases my gas capacity though on some of my trips I needed even more fuel. I'll probably only carrying a small .8 gallon tank of extra fuel on the back of my pannier.

    upload_2019-11-26_0-21-24.png

    KR
    #32
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  13. rickj

    rickj Been here awhile Supporter

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    I rode with Heideanu K60s for my 2015 trip based on the reviews of the tire at that time. I'd categorize them as "decent" tires, but not great as they were skiddish on wet asphalt and they were also not that great off-road, as the solid center patch on them makes for poor traction. The front tire was also the loudest tires I had ever ridden!

    For my 2018 trip I went with the Mitas E-07s and I would rate them as excellent. Far better on-road and off-road performance than the K60s, and they also had impressive longevity.

    I think we covered about 7200 miles on the Alaska trip on new E-07s and maybe 600 miles before the trip. My rear tire was pretty worn when I got back, but I had been running lower pressure on the Dempster and Denali highways, and it was pretty cut up from the sharp rocks. I could probably have ridden another 1000 or more miles, but I bought another E-07 for the rear and kept the front on even though I ride mostly on-road from home.

    In April of this year we did a ride from Southern to Northern California and covered about 1900 miles. We rode pretty aggressive in the mountains, including highway 36 from Red Bluff to Fortuna (supposedly 1811 curves in 140 miles). I was able to hang with the other two riders who were running street tires (Anakee 3s / Pilot Road 4s) with complete confidence. The Mitas required a bit more effort through the curves than the street tires, but never broke loose. Amazing! A few months ago I changed out the E-07s to some Anakee Adventures as I don't need the E-07's off-road capabilities around here. The front E-07 had around 11,200 miles on when I changed it out and it still had at least 1000 miles left on it!

    If I ride Alaska again, or a possible ride to the Idaho BDR, I will absolutely be putting on a set of E-07s!

    I hope this feedback helps.

    Rick
    #33
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  14. Bigbob1

    Bigbob1 Rain Rider Supporter

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    As to tires in Whitehorse as noted Yukon Honda or contact Rick at Yukon Yamaha. Set up a tire change in advance and I think either place can get just about any tire you need.

    Rather than mailing meds to yourself. What I do is contact my phamacy and let them know your going on an extended vacation and will be out of the country. They can contact your insurance carrier and get you the meds to finish the trip. The other option I use is my phamacy is part of a nation chain and I can get meds while I am traveling just about anywhere, they all use the same system to access my info.
    #34
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  15. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    It was my experience that the locals would absolutely FLY in the NWT. I'm talking 4 wheel drifts through the turns in F250 pick up trucks.

    In other words, be prepared for anything!
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  16. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil. Supporter

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    Outstanding. Thanks for the write up. I am definitely re-thinking this and may just use E-07s for my entire trip based upon your and others descriptions of the tires and surfaces.

    I had the same experiences with the K-60's also. Thought they were a decent tire but thought they acted squirrelly on wet asphalt and did nothing really well but lasted forever. I had one friend, a very experienced rider, lose it on a wet corner in a very slow speed turn on K-60's.

    KR
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  17. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil. Supporter

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    My insurance company requires me to use CVS. I will check with them. I have had stuff transferred to NH sometimes. I don't know if they do Canada but I will check. Fortunately I don't have any schedule meds so hopefully that makes it easier.

    Thanks,
    KR
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  18. AllSeasonRider

    AllSeasonRider Wandering, maybe a little lost...

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    What's your range with the camel tank? I bet you'd have enough to not need to carry extra fuel on top of it. Longest stretch I think you'll run into is Dawson City to Eagle Plains, which is 250-ish miles from memory.
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  19. knight

    knight Long timer

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    I recently installed another K 60 on my bike ,it's the sixth one on my NC750X
    I like them
    They have carried me to Ushuaia ,back up to Tuk and down the Baja twice
    I get about 20K klm or 12K-13K miles out of them on a fully loaded bike
    The first one I put on was in Vancouver BC ,it took me the long way to southern Peru , plugged twice enroute

    The only traction issue that I have had with a K60 was the time I had no traction at all, on a wet polished floor in a underground parking lot
    in Mexico city , the tire didn't hook up when I let out the clutch , it just spun ,lol

    My set up and I can be hard on tires
    The stock Dunlop that came with the bike lasted 10 days and 2400 miles before the cord was showing
    The last street tire I put on down here in La Paz, for a quick ride back to Canada ,was totally shot after only 4 & 1/2 days and about the same amount of miles
    #39
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  20. CavReconSGT

    CavReconSGT Just the right amount of evil. Supporter

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    With the Camel tank I get around 270 Miles. You're probably right but I will probably still carry a .8 gallon tank that sits on the side rear of the pannier so that provides another 30 miles or so of range. That would make me feel very comfortable.

    KR
    #40