Sometimes you just need a partner

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by MisterNo, Sep 11, 2018.

  1. MisterNo

    MisterNo Adventurer

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    I ride alone. I bought an InReach so I could communicate my situation in case I get into trouble. It is a life saver but it doesn't make up for not having a partner.

    I was out on a trail I have ridden frequently. However this time it was after a rain the previous night. I had to climb up a fairly steep wash. The rain had made the sand soft and created some big ruts. As I climbed up I hit an off camber portion to avoid the ruts and my rear tire slid down into one. Once I was in the rut I lost momentum and had to stop. When I tried to drive out the rear wheel dug in up to the axle. I fought to get the bike out but each time I got it out of the rut and tried to get going it dug in again due to the softened sand. It was a hot muggy day so it didn't take long for me to get fatigued from trying to get the bike out of the hole. I started to feel light headed and decided I needed to get help. As I hiked up to the top I felt totally exhausted. Once I got to the top I walked out to the nearby road and sat on a rock, waiting for help. There was no shade so I sat there in the sun. I knew I was experiencing heat stroke. After about 1/2 hour I got help. 2 guys pushed while I powered the bike. We got it out easily. If I were not near a road I would likely have had to call for rescue.

    This made me realize that having a satellite beacon does not replace having a partner. If I had a partner I would not have had an issue. In this case I could have turned around and got out, but I could have been in a situation where I could not easily go back.
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  2. redneckK20

    redneckK20 Been here awhile

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    What kind of bike are you on? Off-roading solo on a big bike is always sketchy, I avoid anything difficult if I'm alone.

    Might be worth investing in one of those small portable winches.
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  3. MisterNo

    MisterNo Adventurer

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    drz400. I also avoid risky situations as much as possible. I've ridden this trail several times in the past. Sometimes, like this one, you get into trouble in cases that normally are not a problem. I used to have a klr650. The weight got me into trouble a few times so I got rid of it.
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  4. jay547

    jay547 Long timer

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    I carry a 25' rope but haven't had to use it yet. Hopefully never will.
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  5. MisterNo

    MisterNo Adventurer

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    No way a rope would have made a difference. I could never drag that bike up the hill. A winch system maybe but extra weight to carry. Don't know what they weigh. Will look into it.
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  6. redneckK20

    redneckK20 Been here awhile

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    Good ole Chris Birch has a trick where he ties a rope to a spoke inside of the rear brake rotor on the rear wheel, started the bike, popped it in 1st and very gently slipped the clutch to wind the rope around the hub, creating a super ghetto but somewhat workable winch.
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  7. dddd

    dddd Long timer

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    the old warn17 use to be 8 lbs. but can't even buy it anymore, last I checked.

    lots of guy including me opt for a zdrag pulley prussik system (3:1 mech adv, or more if you setup further pulleys) but there isn't a pretty video showing you a single guy working it out in 5 minutes or succeeding beautifully... it's long, messy, exhausting, but better than nothing.

    your report sound like what I dread the most at every ride. came close about 4 times now. it's called adventure for a reason, but sometimes I think it's for a reason other than taking stupid avoidable risks... But somehow, I feel alive in those moments... Would you rather watch movies and eat chips inside on that sunny day? It didn't kill you, so bet you are stronger (well, smarter I hope).
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  8. Addapost

    Addapost Adventurer

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    Could you have pushed, pulled, hell- flipped the bike back down to the bottom? The few times I've done a sketchy climb up something like that I always figured if I get stuck I'll use gravity to help throw the bike back to the bottom, either for another try up or another way out. Just wondering.
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  9. MisterNo

    MisterNo Adventurer

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    I thought about going down and trying again but after wrestling with it I was gassed and knew it was going to make me even worse. I decided it was best to just get help since I was near a road. If I were more remote that would have been the next choice. If I failed I would likely not have the strength to go back the way I came. That was my biggest fear. Once the heat stroke starts it is hard to get relief.

    Again, sometimes you just need a partner.
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  10. craigincali

    craigincali Just hanging around

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    I NEVER off road solo. Not smart IMO.
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  11. MisterNo

    MisterNo Adventurer

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    Wish I had that option.
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  12. VanXR

    VanXR nOOb/NooB/noob/NOob/NOOB/

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    Been there and done that. Parked my bike in the bushes and started walking. It was about 10 miles back to my truck. Made it about 5 miles and just by chance 2 riders came along. Rode double back to my bike and they towed me to my truck. Last time I rode alone. I was 19 or 20 at the time and in excellent shape. I'm 53 now.
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  13. dddd

    dddd Long timer

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    No but it's manly, liberating, quiet. You can start end at any time, improvise, and meet a challenge.
    The good answer is that "SOMETIMES", one just needs a partner, not all the times.
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  14. Snowbird

    Snowbird Cereal Killer

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    While I agree with the OP's point, truth is any time a person is alone he/she can get into a situation where another person could make a difference. For example, while riding pavement low siding in a curve and sliding off the edge where it makes the rider difficult to find.

    I think I'd make a habit to carry drinking water, though in the heat.
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  15. MisterNo

    MisterNo Adventurer

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    I had water. It did not stop the heat stroke. Only way to stop it is to cool down. Once I got moving on the road I recovered.

    I think the point of this experience is a satellite beacon can bring rescue or save your life but a partner can keep you out of trouble.
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  16. Kommando

    Kommando Long timer

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    ...or a winch/come-along.
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  17. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Long timer

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    You can get some small 2-3 sheave pulley blocks and a hundred feet of paracord, making your own adjustable tie-able unit that wads up small. I actually used to have one some years ago. It was pretty useful every once in a great while. Wish I knew where I lost it.
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  18. CaptCapsize

    CaptCapsize Been here awhile

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    I ride alone and remote frequently. Not smart, I know, but I like the freedom of the experience. I too use and InReach. I am not a very skilled rider, so I know my skill limitations. I have no fear of turning tail and going back the way I came when the going gets tough.

    One of my favorite quotes is from W.C Fields, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again. Then quit, no use being a damn fool about it." :lol3

    I have only once had to call for the wife to rescue me. That time I was riding with a friend. I just had my second flat and nether my tube or the spare were able to be patched. I rode about 3 miles on the flat tire, before my wife came to my rescue. She had driven about 2 hours to get to me with the truck. Not a single complaint from her about retrieving me. I am a lucky man!
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  19. MisterNo

    MisterNo Adventurer

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    Having a partner doesn't necessarily help if you get injured or break down. That is where the satellite beacon has the advantage. Without it the partner has to ride out to get help. With it you can call for help right away and coordinate the rescue. There are pros and cons to both.
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  20. PistonPants

    PistonPants Crankcase Scavenger

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    Self-rescue is always the best rescue. I ride solo all the time. The alternative is to not ride. I carry an InReach these days. Have yet to call in help, but good to have.

    This winter I got hella stuck, repeatedly on my new snowmobile. I worked half an hour to get unstuck only to go 40ft and auger in again. And again. Daylight fading, I heard another sled approach. I was rescued by a 15 yr old girl on an old ass Yamaha Enticer. Humbling to say the least.

    Piston
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