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South Dakota to South America, and wherever else

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by SturgisChick, Jun 24, 2014.

  1. crazycruiser

    crazycruiser Adventurer

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Oddometer:
    57
    Location:
    San Fran Bay Area
    Best of luck on your journey. When will you be in Ushuaia, you think?

    I am heading down there soon www.crazyridesouth.com. Maybe we'll run in to each other.

    Axel
    #41
  2. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    Heading west out of Belize we stop at the western border with Guatemala. First we have to check out with the Belize Immigration and Aduana.
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    We buy a little of the Guatemalan money before we cross the border, which is what we usually try to do. That way we have enough money to pay our entry fees, fumigation fees, get a bottle of water if it's a hot day, etc.
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    head on to the fumigation booth next, because apparently the parasites 20 feet down the road are completely different and we need to get rid of whatever awful stuff we may have picked up in Belize, lol. We, thankfully, are advised to ride around the spray booth (looks like a giant carwash) so we don't get our bodies covered n toxic spray and instead a guy does it with a hand sprayer.
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    We head to the Guatemalan Immigration and Aduana offices next to get ourselves and the bikes checked into the country. We wait in a couple of lines, but all in all they move pretty fast. I think this entire border (both sides) took just over an hour to get through.
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    On the way to Tikal National Park we stop on the shores of Lago Peten Itza for a big lunch.
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    I'm feeling really guilty afterwards though when I see a starving dog. I go off to buy some bread and give it something to eat and when i come back he is gone. It's something you have to get used to south of the USA border, lots of injured, homeless and starving dogs. And as a dog lover, it's a tough one for me.
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    We carry on to Tikal and set up our tent and camp for a couple of nights. On the way in we see lots of signs notifying us we need to watch out for the local wildlife. You get an entrance ticket that is time stamped, and when you get all the way into the park a ranger checks your time to make sure you weren't speeding. Something worth knowing if you're ever headed here.
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    We opt to take a sunset tour of the ruins and then have part of tomorrow in them as well after a sunrise tour. Incredible and worth it, but back to back sunset/sunrise tours makes for a short night.
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    The ruins at Tikal are absolutely stunning. Temple 4 was shown in one of the Star Wars movie so that's why it looked so familiar! We see a few new critters here too, including a cousin of the raccoon.
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    After we leave the park, we ride back out to the lake and into the small island town of Flores. We take a boat ride on the lake and it's fantastic.
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    Then we head south along the east side of the country to Rio Dulce. It's on the coast and lots of sailboats are anchored here for the winter...or permanently. It's probably nicer than I thought it was, but the heat and humidity didn't match with our cheap (no Air Con) budget, so we had to move on in search of a higher altitude. We headed west of Rio Dulce on the north side of Lago de Izabal. Not far out the road got a bit rough. Lots of potholes in the road, dust and traffic and some hills and twists, which aren't as easy to manage on gravel/dirt.
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    We spent the night in a small lodge south of Coban which was fantastic. I knew when i saw the room had a wool blanket on the bed that we had finally gotten up and out of the heat. We carry on west the next day, heading for Chichicastenango via the northern route. And it's fantastic.
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    We ride through Chichicastenango on market day. And I'm bummed since we don't have time to check it out, and it's supposed to be one of the best in the country, before it gets dark. We are heading for Panajachel tonight and have a lot of miles left to go and these roads are the steepest and twistiest/curviest I've ever ridden, so we are averaging something like 25 mph. We get to Panajachel and find a place to stash the bikes for a while we take the lanchas (small water taxi boats) across the lake to a small village without streets to stay with our friend (and fellow ADVRider member) from Canada.
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    I'm looking forward to seeing her again. She's the woman who welcomed us into her home for a few months while I recovered from my broken leg. Lago Atitlan is surrounded with great small towns and villages, and a beautiful Mayan culture. It's incredible and we enjoy the local life.
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    After a couple of weeks off the bike, and with our friend, we hit the road again. Next stop, Antigua. And it's beautiful too with it's old colonial buildings and cobblestoned streets, although they aren't the best for riding on dry, much less in the rain.
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    IThere are volcanoes everywhere! And we can see another 2 or 3 from this lovely city. We stay a few days and catch up with a friend we met who is headed south too and he introduces us to a couple riding 2-up on a Beemer. And somewhere down the road we will all meet again...ie. The Stahlratte. Next stop El Salvador.
    #42
  3. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    Congratulations! We hope to be there sometime after the new year...will check out your website, and please feel free to keep in touch in case we get the chance to meet up somewhere. Wishing you safe and happy travels!

    Michelle
    #43
  4. adventurebound9517

    adventurebound9517 Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,021
    Location:
    Lake Havasu City, AZ.
    Sturgis Chick
    I'm enjoying following along on this epic adventure of yours. I didn't see what you are riding posted but it looks like a Yamaha, if so which model. Safe travels.
    Phillip
    #44
  5. UKbri

    UKbri Just a Rider

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Oddometer:
    249
    Location:
    East Sussex. UK
    I'll butt in as SC is asleep. I'm the 'other half'. SC is on a 2011 Kawasaki KLR650 and I'm on a 2009 Yamaha XT660Z Tenere.
    #45
  6. adventurebound9517

    adventurebound9517 Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,021
    Location:
    Lake Havasu City, AZ.

    Thanks. I thought you were on the KLR. We don't see many or any XT660Z's here in the states.
    Phillip
    #46
  7. UKbri

    UKbri Just a Rider

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Oddometer:
    249
    Location:
    East Sussex. UK
    Mine has been there since early 2010 when I rode up from Ushuaia. It's done 49 states and 77,000 miles.
    #47
  8. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    After a while I figured out that when anyone says "watch out for...." fill-in-the-blank for their neighboring country that it is just how it works. For some reason, everyone seems to speak badly of and distrust their neighbors. Americans are wary of Mexicans, and Mexicans weren't speaking too highly of Guatemala, and so on...but everyone seemed to be leery of El Salvador, and everyone was afraid of Honduras. That latter one I sort of agree with, but that's for the next post.

    As we leave Guatemala, we rode from Antigua down to Esquintla and then Guazacapan to be close to the border and cross over in the morning at La Hachadura. There was a line of semis stopped in the road ahead of us. we decided to follow the other smaller local bikes around them to the left, dodging any oncoming traffic in the process. And I'm glad we did since the line of trucks was a mile or two long.
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    We pulled up at the Immigration office to check out of Guatemala and then walked around to the back side to the Aduana to check out bikes out. The customs officer had to come out and verify the VIN number on the bikes matched our papers, and then on we go through No Man's Land, which was a bridge over a small river, and on to the El Salvador side.
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    We made it to the Immigration window before a bus load of people showed up and formed a huge line, thankfully, and then headed to the Aduana to get the bikes processed. We worked with a helper on this border, and in hindsight we probably didn't need to, but I'm pretty sure his help was enough to get us ahead of that bus, so he was worth the $5 we paid him.
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    Welcome to El Salvador!
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    The roads were good and wide enough to handle all the extra traffic with horse and ox carts and wagons. We headed toward La Libertad on a coastal road that our friends Billy and Trish suggested when we chatted back in Mazatlan.
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    Apparently there are enough surfers walking along this road you need to watch out for them. But I think they were all in the water when I was there, and I don't blame them.
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    As we rode through the 4 or 5 tunnels along the route, Brian was in the lead, as usual. I'm slow and prefer to take in the view when I can safely instead of racing along...which means I'm slow. Two guys from San Salvador were on a long lunch break and came blowing past me. Being the nice El Salvadorans they were, they waved and blew horns as they passed. They caught up with Brian further up the road and stopped to chat with him as he waited for me to catch up. And they invited us to a place up the road for a beer. Turns out, they bought us lunch and we chatted about travels, bikes, our countries for a while. It was incredible. So much for what you hear in other countries. Each experience and place is different each time you go.
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    The view from the restaurant was spectacular.
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    We stayed at a small place on the beach not far from La Libertad and we had company at our breakfast table in the morning.
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    Then we continued east along the coast for most of the day. Farmers dry their crops on the shoulders of the roads in the sun and then bag them up each night.
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    Cattle graze even on the medians and islands at roundabouts all along the highways.
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    We turned north then and headed through small towns to the Pan Am Highway and then headed back west through San Salvador and stayed in Santa Ana.
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    We rode up to Cerro Verde National Park, home to several volcanoes. And the view and ride were incredible.
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    We zigged and zagged all around El Salvador and spent several days wandering between an archaeological dig, the volcanoes and lakes, the mountains and cities.

    On our way out we headed for the border with Honduras at La Palma, up in the mountains.
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    I'd heard it was a cute little village known for its painted murals and walls.
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    We stayed at a great little hostel and used the "suicide shower". I had heard about them before coming south and saw and used my first in Guatemala. Should have shared it sooner.
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    It's a flash heater that heats the water as it is running through the shower head. But the wiring is a little scary and I never like the idea of mixing electricity with water, especially that close...apparently that's why it's earned it's nickname.

    Next stop, Honduras.
    #48
  9. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    My apologies for the repetitive way the border crossing shakes out. I'm posting pics of most of the borders in case anyone else needs any info. or needs an idea of what places look like if they're headed that way. If it's at all boring, I promise you it was way more boring in person to stand in all those lines.

    We ride out of La Palm early in the morning heading just a few miles, less than 5, up the road to the border with Honduras. This isn't a very busy border, especially not for tourists so we don't have to wait in line for too long. First, you know the drill....out of El Salvador with Migracion and the Aduana.
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    Then we check in at the small little Migracion office on the Honduras side. The country, just 100 feet in from the border, already looks dirtier, more impoverished and less organized than El Salvador.
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    We complete the necessary form and get processed through Migracion and then head about 300 meters up the road (yes, I'm American but I'm starting to use the metric system, weird...) to the peaches and cream building of the Aduana. Let the party begin (sense the sarcasm) as we struggle through language barriers and a new Customs agent going through training.
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    We process the bikes in but now have to pay the required entry fees for the bikes, and that has to be done back down at the bank next to the Migracion office.
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    We also need some copies made about halfway between the offices. So Brian stays with bikes and I walk, in all my gear and the heat, and go get these things done. The armed guard at the bank wants an explanation before he will even let me into the bank. Everyone here is carrying a shotgun, wow. But it all goes well and i hike back to the Aduana and we finish our paperwork and are off.
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    We ride toward Copan Ruinas, another small border town (border with Guatemala) that is further north of where we crossed in. The ruins themselves are supposed to be among the best in Central America and even though they are out of the way for us at the moment, we think it's worth a couple of extra days to make sure we don't miss it. The town itself is cute and a little touristy with lots of cute places to eat and grab a beer and take a day off.
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    Billy and Trish, friends we met in Mazatlan, have said to watch for Macaws that are perched all around the entrance to the ruins....and I can't walk there fast enough. This a sort of sanctuary for injured and ill birds. Loads of feeders get a lot of traffic and the birds perch high up in trees when they aren't bellied up to the trough, usually in pairs, and they squawk all over the valley.
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    We enter the ruins at the large Plaza de las Estrellas which is filled with giant carved stone statues. They are incredible.
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    The place is enormous and there is just no way for my camera to do it justice. The grand staircase leading up to a temple is covered with a canvas shade to protect the detail of the carving of the face of each step and then statues from eroding in the incredibly heavy spring rains and heat.
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    Trees have grown up and through many of the temples and buildings, making it look like a movie set.
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    Copan was worth every mile.

    But after completing Copan we have the entire country to cross now and not really much on our "wish list" for sites to see. I'd love to get to the beaches and islands at Utila or Roatan, but that's a pain with the bikes so we head south through the middle of the country across the state of Comayagua. We're enjoying the green rolling hills and valleys the next day and are thinking about where we want to go for the night. We turn onto a narrow local road and it leads across a fun little water crossing and up through a beautiful valley. There isn't much traffic and it's peaceful. We hope it leads back to the main highway and in the direction of the city we are going to for the night.
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    We make the choice to ride through San Jose de Comayagua and when we get there late on a Friday afternoon, the town is quiet. Kids and a few people stop to stare as we ride through, so I'm guessing they don't get much traffic through here. We ride to the other end of the town and it isn't looking like it leads where we want it to, so we turn around and plan to ride back the 10 or so miles to the highway where we know our way.
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    After we turn and are headed back on the main street of this one-street town, Brian is leading and I am watching a tuk tuk come toward us. Brian looks to the right at a couple of kids playing in the dirt and near some construction materials. I look up ahead and to the left and see 3 men standing near the police station and I watch while one pulls a handgun out and shoots it in the direction of the building. I hear the shot and then watch him re-holster his gun and turn around facing us coming up the road. This same guy points at Brian and directs him to pull over. To say I'm afraid for my life is an understatement. I left my bike in gear and was running through scenarios of how to get away or what to do and how to ride 10 miles of dirt and gravel back to the highway....all in a split second. I watched Brian lift his visor and the man say something to him. And in my girliest high-pitched voice as i rolled to a stop I lifted my visor so the guy could see me and said "Hola, Buenas tardes", hoping that in any way it might matter to this man that one of us was a woman. I could smell the gunpowder and thought I might throw up.

    The man turned to look at me and didn't say a word. He looked drunk or high to me and like he was looking for a fight. I had heard Brian reply to him and found out later that what Brian said, without understanding much Spanish, was "Turisto de Inglaterra". The man stood still for a moment and looked slowly back and forth between us. The slowly he raised his right hand and waved us on. Brian put his visor down and started to pull away. I was convinced this was a trap and this wasn't over but was happy to at least be moving, even if it wasn't for long.

    Brian led us down the street and around the corner and I followed. All the while I was looking in my left mirror and watching behind me waiting for the guy to shoot me in the back. I can be a crazy mix of oblivious and paranoid, but this was genuinely a scary situation. We hit the edge of town and kept going. And about 1/4 mile out of town I saw a white pickup truck start to follow us down this gravel road. Oh, I see, I think to myself. This guy is gonna follow us out of town and take us out on the back roads instead of right in town. Brian was riding at a steady pace and a decent speed but I was panicked, so I rode his ass the entire way. I just wanted to see an oncoming car or people so that maybe it would interrupt whatever might be going on.

    We crossed the water again and Brian kept his sensible and steady pace. My heartbeat never slowed down the entire time. And finally, after what seemed like ages, I didn't see the white pickup keeping up with us anymore. And a few minutes later we were back in the small village next to the highway. Brian pulled over and got his map out and I said I wanted to just keep going and get some miles behind us, but he had no idea why. WTF?! He had been looking at the kids when I was looking at the police officer (PS - did I forget to mention that? This guy was a uniformed officer standing in front of the police station.) and he thought as he passed that they had set off a big firework with a loud bang. He didn't have any idea what had just happened until I told him what I'd seen. No wonder he was riding like normal while I was doing my best dirt biker imitation.

    Now don't get me wrong, I know bad things can happen anywhere at any time, even in a rural area in the United States. I had heard lots of warnings about every country south of the USA border, and I never ignore them, but I really try hard to give everyone the benefit of the doubt. I had definitely heard a lot more bad about Honduras than many of the other countries.

    I'm not a fan of fear mongering, or third-party stories....and I don't want to take away from the beautiful parts and people of Honduras. I would go back there again, definitely. But I also want to be realistic and share my own personal experience with others in the event it can make them safer. So there it is....that's my experience in Honduras.

    We took a few minutes to regroup and get ready to ride the highway, with all its crazy traffic, and get to the next town we felt comfortable staying in which would be an hour away. And we made it just fine. There were two great guys at the hotel we stayed at who offered us parking under the hotel canopy and stopped to chat as they ride too. That's how it is, isn't it, every where you go....some good and some bad.

    The next day we kept moving south. I was having a hard time trying to find anything I wanted to do in this country, other than get out of it. I know that's not necessarily a fair judgment of it, but that's how I felt. So we rode over the mountains to Tegucigalpa and rode on a new bypass road overlooking the giant sprawling city below.
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    We kept moving all day, and over the next set of hills and south all the way to Choluteca where we stopped and stayed.
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    The next day we crossed into Nicaragua.
    #49
  10. adventurebound9517

    adventurebound9517 Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,021
    Location:
    Lake Havasu City, AZ.
    You say it was hard to communicate at the borders, do you or Brian speak Spanish or do you have an app on your phone for that?
    Phillip
    #50
  11. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    I speak enough Spanish to travel ok with, and can have basic conversations, etc. But there are more technical words sometimes in the forms and directions we get from officials in person that exceed my conversational Spanish. We have an offline dictionary app that i use to look up words called Languages, and we also have Word Lens that is an app you use to hold up to printed things and it will translate, but I have to be honest its not my favorite. I practiced Spanish before the trip with Duo Lingo and loved that app.

    The language and accents change a lot from country to country and region to region. In Mexico and other parts of Central America STOP signs say "ALTO" and then the further south we got they changed to "PARE". Verbs change too, and when a verb for throwing trash out use to be "tirar" in Mexico and now it's "botar" and so on....just lots of local interpretations and while I have a pretty big vocabulary i run into a lot of new stuff after every border and words just sound different. G's are silent in some cases in parts of Latin America, but not treated the same in other places.

    Anyway, hope this helps.
    Michelle
    #51
  12. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    We make for the border as usual at a pretty early time. It usually takes 2-3 hours to get across a border including both countries paperwork and the lines. We ride south from Choluteca to Guasaule and get in line to check out of Honduras.
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    There were a lot of kids at both sides of this border crossing, wanting to work for any small amount of money you would give them. about a half dozen boys were hanging around and offering to watch our bikes in return for some money. While we are pretty self-contained and locked up well, I didn't think it could hurt too much to pay them 50 cents or something. I'd rather have them "working" than getting into trouble or stealing or whatever. So we paid these two boys a dollar each to watch our two bikes. We went in and checked out at the Aduana and then again with Migracion.
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    Then we rode past the small guard shack and off toward Nicaragua where we had to stop and get the bikes fumigated. And an entirely new group of kids gathered while we waited there in hopes of small jobs.
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    At first we said we didn't need any help and thanked them, but these two boys kept following us and helping us even though we didn't need it. The heavy set kid knew his way around really well and kept calling me senorita and being so polite I couldn't refuse him.
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    They hung out with us in case we needed anything while we bought insurance at the front door to the Aduana/Migracion office (all in one building).
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    We process in the bikes first and then ourselves just down the hall.
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    Brian spent the time waiting in lines teaching the boys this trick he showed my nephew a couple of years ago where it looks like part of his finger detaches. These boys made me laugh so much as they had never seen it before and were trying so hard to figure it out. Finally Brian showed them the and kept coaching them how to do it so they could show other people.
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    Welcome to Nicaragua.
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    We pulled over a few miles from the border to take our pacsafes off so they don't wear holes in our waterproof bags. An ox cart rolls past while we sit in the shade for a quick water break. It's hot and sunny here and the cart driver wears a hoodie to keep out of the sun.
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    The land is open and flat here, and almost all farming land. We can see some dormant volcanoes/hills to our left along the highway as we ride toward Leon.
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    Brian has been in contact with Juergen at Bike-Nicaragua.com and we will be staying with him and his lovely wife, Elli, for a few days while we site see. She teaches Spanish if we're interested and the room includes breakfast each day. Juergen helps Brian with some maintenance work on the bikes too. So it's the perfect place for us to stay.
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    Juergen rents out bikes for people who want to fly in, and he guides too if you're interested. And he and Elli and a friend of theirs take us to the beach the afternoon we arrive. Fresh fried fish and cold beers on the beach after riding into a new country...what a perfect day.
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    A funny and cute tough-girl, Shannon, flies in from Vancouver while we are there and takes a few days of Spanish lessons before taking off for a couple of weeks riding around this beautiful country all on her own...ah to be young again.

    We wander around Leon and check out the central plaza and the beautiful cathedral there while local boys play soccer.
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    There's a lot of murals and graffiti on the walls of the city, and some is anti-American. I'm sure we have earned some of it, sadly.
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    Juergen takes us out on a black sand road to the middle of nowhere one afternoon to hike up a small and still active volcano, Cerro Negro. We each carry a cold beer (although it doesn't stay very cold) up to the top for sunset.
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    It's just under two hours for the hike, up and down, and it's stunning. We can see a long line of volcanoes that must form and pop up on the land as the tectonic plates slide over the hot spot under neath.
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    We sit on the west side of the summit down in a low spot to avoid the wind and enjoy those beers.
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    Then comes the fun part. A lot of tours come up here to "surf" down the volcano which sounds incredible. But we didn't bring boards today, so Juergen assures us that running down the steep slope is just as good...and he's right. My grin was coated in black volcano dust when we got to the bottom. Wow! Too much fun.
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    I'm loving Nicaragua.
    #52
  13. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    After a week in Leon getting rested, recharged, and hanging out with a friend of mine who flew down (with new JT Sprockets and chains!) in Leon, it's time to move on. We ride south adn through Managua but decide not to hang out. We keep riding south toward Granada but make a stop at Masaya Volcano and ride up to the edge of teh volcanoe to look in.
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    The view of the flat land as we ride down from the volcano is beautiful.
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    We make it to Granada in time for dinner and a stroll around the town. It's a lovely town filled with colonial architecture.
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    There's a chocolate museum in town, and the three of us (Brian and I and our new riding companion Shannon from Vancouver) all wanna go check it out. So the next morning we stop by for breakfast and chocolate bars for the road..,cinnamon, chipotle, 70% cacao, white chocolate...it's a fantasy land.
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    We keep heading south and go to catch the ferry to Isla Ometepe. We read the ferry schedule wrong, as it was a little confusing. There are ferries that run and they say they can take motorcycles, but they mean the local tiny bikes and they put them on the boat with a lift. We need the roll on-roll off ferry and it's just left. So we wait and have a bite of lunch in the shade.
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    Once the ferry gets in we have to move pretty quickly. We bought tickets for us and the bikes (separate) and then pay the port taxes for us and for the bikes (again separate) and then the gates open about 30 minutes before departure and there's a mad rush to get in place to load. We ride on first and have to do a u-turn on the wet metal deck and park along one side. The crew ties the bikes up to the rails lifting up off their kickstands which didn't make sense to me but it all worked out.
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    The ferry takes about an hour and a half and we enjoy the view from the top deck during the crossing. We can see the two volcanoes and the low saddle of land between them that form the island.
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    We land at the ferry terminal and ride off and get our bearings. We are headed for a small hostel on the other volcanoe and have about an hour of riding ahead of us. It's already getting close to 4pm so we get moving. The road crosses the airport runway.
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    The road isn't paved, it's all locking blocks that look like asphalt. And when we get to the other volcano it turns to dirt for the last few miles.
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    We spend a great couple of days at the hostel and the view of the mist over the other part of the island is gorgeous.
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    It's a cute little rural community out here. Lots of chickens wandering around, like all over Latin America...horses too and pigs.
    [​IMG]
    After a couple of days we make an early morning run for the ferry and get stuck in a traffic jam of cattle.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    But eventually it cleared out and we made the ferry on time. And on the other side we ride for San Juan del Sur, a cool surf town, for some beach time and beer.
    [​IMG]
    We're working under a deadline now, tryin gto make it to the next scheduled sailing of the Stahlratte bound for Columbia out of Panama, so we need to keep moving. We leave Shannon in a hammock and hit the road heading for the border with Costa Rica. Along the highway and all along the southern edge of Lake Ometepe there are wind farms...and you know what that means...wind. Yummy.
    [​IMG]
    #53
  14. LumpyOne

    LumpyOne Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2009
    Oddometer:
    355
    Location:
    WestSconnie
    Nice update and great pictures. Thanks for bringing us along! Safe travels.

    TIm
    #54
  15. acidman1968

    acidman1968 Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2012
    Oddometer:
    198
    Location:
    Utah, Great Basin / Intermountain West
    Enjoying the read during a quiet night shift, SC! Thanks for sharing the adventure to some of us who are bound down with work!

    Ride safely!

    So are you riding down through Chile and crossing the Andes into Argentina, or staying on the Argentina side the whole way? Just asking because I lived in Chile between 1987 and 1989. I loved that country, and dream of someday returning and riding from the north to the south...
    #55
  16. adventurebound9517

    adventurebound9517 Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2011
    Oddometer:
    1,021
    Location:
    Lake Havasu City, AZ.
    So you have been absent from this forum for a week or more, should we send out search & rescue? :ear
    #56
  17. statsman

    statsman Long timer

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,396
    Location:
    Toronto ON
    I see you have recovered from your mishap and trust you have resumed your journey.
    #57
  18. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    Yep, thanks. Been back on the road and riding south since the end of September last year so almost ten months now and am in Colombia. Wishing you happy riding!
    #58
  19. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    Thanks so much. Wishing you happy riding!
    #59
  20. SturgisChick

    SturgisChick Born and Raised

    Joined:
    May 26, 2012
    Oddometer:
    309
    Location:
    Black Hills, South Dakota
    Ha! Not yet, but thanks. Been working on a coffee farm with no internet....so maybe if you could send a good wifi link for me that would be great. :evil
    #60