South Turkey Mission on a Jawa

Discussion in 'Ride Reports - Epic Rides' started by asphaltmueller, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. § 2(3)AVV

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    This thread could a bit slow going, because I type left handed only - broke my collarbone at the Horizons Unlimited Meeting in Bulgaria, when a cage debatted my right to usage of roadspace in a tight corner.

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    The Mission : go to Hattay on the Syrian Border and partcipate in the Honorary Consuls meeting. This is not a professional event in ths sense that I can claim travel cost. So I chose to use the bike, viewing I have a lot of vacation left. To sweeten the pill for the Boss I would do a routine inspection in our honorary office in Mersin, being on the way.

    Then the Boss meant I should do some training in our new honorary office in Gaziantep, a bit out of the way eastwards...

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    This thread will contain photos of me running around 200ms under the water level of a hydroelectric dam, of Orthodox Christian and the last Armenian Village in Turkey, some Industrie stuff and other things not really connected to riding as such.
    But I would expect it to be interesting to some nevertheless and I hope it's OK with the mods.

    It was the first longer test ride of my new solo bike, the Jawa, for my old bike, the MZ would stay with Hack - see the winter trip in my sigline.

    I so was looking for a solo bike and Mehmet found an original police Jawa on the turkish ebay clone, good shape, good price, deal done.

    That's how she arrived
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    Whilst doing the paperwork, we serviced her and replaced a lot of faulty electrics
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    Birol, my friend and mechanic, in whose workshop we fool around

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    Hodja, the teacher and electrics specialist

    and the way such evenings usually finish in Ankara

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    OK, so on sunday 7th I set of; in the meantime the embassy had been asked to sent someone to Ermenek, northeast of Antalya, to assist in the inspection of a hydroelectric dam project. The Boss just told me that she considered it was on my way. Thanks Mam, WillCo.

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    On this trip I would need a suit, dress shirts, correct shoes... So the small Samsonite from the flea market came on the back seat.
    Programm was 2.300-400 km in 10 days, hereby 6 days of mostly work.

    After leaving Ankara, I took of the highway immideatly and chose the road to Haymana to continue to Cihanbeyli, where a lot of our Immigrants are from, on to Konya, the Capital of the turkish Dervish Sect and on to stay the night in the small town of Karaman.


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    Haymana, a small Spa Town and a typical sight in Anatolia - Highrises in the nowhere

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    sources are maintained for the traveller; often by private persons, as this is considered as a pious deed.

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    Villages are sometimes at a great distance, and some of the gas stations only have diesel and LPG




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    some of the firefighting equipment maybe a bit dated

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    some friendly help when later I find a station with gas

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    resting place for the crew
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    he actually asked me to get away with my cigarette

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    family picnic outside
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    "immigrant workers palaces" near Cihanbeyli

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    another diesel only station

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    keep nature tidy or so

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    on the highway to Konya

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    the Derwish, the symbol of this town

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    it's said to be very conservative, but the sales of booze are the highest per capita in Turkey.

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    turkish prices - roughly 2 € a liter

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    and to finish the first day- the Hotel room in Karaman, as uninteresting a photo as it is.
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    I had rolled around in the town looking for a Hotel, then saw a few young guys, one riding an MZ, and asked them to take me to a Hotel. It was good and cheap, as the Pizza latter and the internetcafe.

    tomorrow to the Hydroelectric Barrage in the mountains of Ermenek
    #1
  2. enduro0125

    enduro0125 Sticks and Stones™..

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    :lurk
    #2
  3. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. § 2(3)AVV

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    stupid internet-connection just cost me the whole installment, lost while uploading

    so, here we go again

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    sight out of the Hotel Window in Karaman
    after a good nights sleep I start the morning with the camping gas burner and the italian Espresso Maker, always on the bike.

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    small park with a fountain, so typically of any turkish town

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    the statue of the famous admiral and Carthographer Piri Reis in the Townsquare.
    in southern Izmir, there is a submarine bearing his name, likely a WWII fleetboat (and also a frigatte) moored, which are open for the public. quite interesting.

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    the Turkish Railway still proudly displays the red star

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    direction Taurus mountains

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    I'm having my first " gas station tea" with this friendly folks

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    my bike carries an old style small license tag with the provincial code "19", which causes a lot of questions.
    Lately the registration of motorvehicles has been completly computerized in Turkey, and now everything takes much, much longer. But you need not change your old plate anymore, it even costs extra.
    So I proudly wear the "19" for Corum, which is anatolian HillBilly at it's deepest
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    ascending the Taurus

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    Acriculture in the valley below

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    a major landslide causes a deviation over 28kms rough dirtroad


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    the long descents are not optimal for a 2 stroke and the notouriously weak Jawa breaks - though mine has a front disc and this piece of modern equipment does actually help

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    coffee break

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    small, distant villages

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    ascending the Taurus to Ermenek

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    the relentless power of the 24 hp 2 stroke twin pushes the Jawa upward

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    having arrived in the only hotel in Ermenek, we meet a russian cousin, an IZH

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    bazar-soft-luggage

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    the other members of the delegation had not yet arrived and I'm having a quiet afternoon in the hotel
    #3
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  4. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. § 2(3)AVV

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    This photo shows Ermenek Town in the Distance, upper midle, and in the middle the new village for families dislocated by the new lake

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    this installment is a bit difficult for me, as that's work, and I don't really know how much I can write and how much I can leave out without looking like a tourist on thr taxpayers money. It's also not a typical aspect of our work - it was the second time in ten years I did something like that.

    new lake at a distance, unfortunately very hazy
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    The Hydroelectric powerstation in Ermenek, which is nearly ready, was built by a consortium of companies, with a turkish leader and a lot of Austrian participation, especially concerning the technical equiment, where Austria is still about Nr. one.
    The Austrian taxpayer helped to get cheap financing, and so the Parliament ordered to check if the rules had been kept, also in all matters concerning ecology and concerning the people in the valley, especially those displaced by the waters.

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    the town itself is a small mountain town without much economie and does hope now to attract tourism with the lake. Especially sailing sports should flourish thanks to prevailing wind conditions.

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    We met the mayor and the head of county administration and discussed some grievance points of the relocated villagers. Those were mainly with the county and not with the federal agency responsible for the dam.

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    we also had a look at the dam

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    the dam is built in a very narrow gorge but 210 ms high. We were put into a gondola and lowered to the base with a cable crane

    the gondola has a plexiglass-floor


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    under the dams foundations and below 200ms of water

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    the drainage water being seen in the photo is considered way below limit

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    don't hich a free ride ?

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    it's a turkish construction side, so there has to be Tea; connection of the Samowar to the mains is a bit rustic, though

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    turbine house (the part over ground)
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    got to make a break
    #4
  5. enduro0125

    enduro0125 Sticks and Stones™..

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    Dam!!

    :clap
    #5
  6. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. § 2(3)AVV

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    nice full-fairing MZ belonging to one of the workers

    as there was some time left, the representative of the turkish consortium leader invited us to a boat trip to see the installations from the waterside

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    looks like a pleasure cruiser, but is a rather clapped out workhorse - more on that soon

    intake for the turbines

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    overflow to the right; in a few weeks the reservoir will be full

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    then the stearing of the boat gave up, to which one of the company representatives just shrugged and meant, that the week before they had had a leak.

    After some tries from the pilot which didn't help, I went aft and found that our minibus-driver had got a grasp on the situation and was doing the right thing

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    we disconnected the hydraulics and I steered her home with my foot

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    the traditional sector of the economy does accept the new installations

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    in the evening we participated in the handing over of the Ski-Club installations to the town council.

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    Yep, Ski club. Some Austrians and some town folks and forest rangers must have had too much Raki one night 3 or 4 Years ago, when this idea was born, but it got built on the companies expense and is actually active, with a 300m lift and 50+ sets of equipment to borrow.

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    Mr. J. L. from Austria handing over the documents to the mayor


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    well, we had a nice barbeque and the delegation went to bed early.
    As I had mentioned, I don't want to write to much about what we, respectively the real inspectors did there, but the project was good on track with only minor points to adress. One of the embassies tasks here is to make clear that we are here always and we keep an eye on it

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    so the next morning I went off to Mersin, first over nice mountain roads, then the really sucking coastal road

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    a lot of old Jeeps around here; they do have serious winters in those mountains

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    sister bike

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    camping Mosque

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    lovely riding through the cannyons of the Taurus mountains to the coast; unfortunately under some time constraints, otherwise I would have taken the road due south to Cape Anamur, which is said to be more spectacular still

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    that's a still from the Video camera I had mounted over the fairing; does actually work; now I got to learn to use You Tube or such

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    the coastal road is like a permanent inner city rush-hour with concrete as nearly only sight - it's better to take the Interstate

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    at one gas station I ran into RTW-Dougs Turkey support Vehicle

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    I found I had basically no photos of Mersin; it's a dynamic, modern harbour town, the leading harbour of the anatolian "Tiger" cities and of northern Irak.
    They have an extremly nice miles long park along the shore, and a new maritme museum, that wasn't opened yet when I knocked.
    It ain't touristy a bit.

    I stayed in some drab, but cheap and good enough business traveler Hotel in the center and walked around a bit in the evening.
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    sight out of the hotel room
    the red/black flags are to celebrate the accession of the local football (soccer) team to the first league

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    these chinese electro mofas can be seen a lot in the (usually absolutely flat) coastal areas
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    Jobwise the tasks were fullfilled quickly, especially as the honorary office does not handle money and so I didn't have to check any book-keeping.

    I spent a very nice evening with the Honorary Consul, a real old school gentleman, who remembered the Mersin of 40.000 Inhabitants of his youth compared to the million + city of today

    Next morning I hit the Interstate to Gazi Antep

    finally some sort of map :

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    I would like to have some feedback if including the non-riding parts in the report is of interest
    I also would like to excuse myself for sometimes lacking photos - my camera died a slow death on that trip, the motor for the autofocus went and I had to discart a lot of pics for not being sharp

    tomorrow a bit on Gazi Antep and a dam on the Euphrat river and the ride to Hattay
    #6
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  7. toshi

    toshi n00b

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    hahaha :) @asphaltmueller tea is a traditional drink in turkey ;)
    #7
  8. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. § 2(3)AVV

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    edited :

    if you mean the "gas station tea" looks like I should have added "first of the day" for clarity

    or do you find the samowar under the dam foundation as funny as me ?


    otherwise :see us serving turkish tea at a european winter meeting :

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    p.s : where are you from ?
    #8
  9. 621andy

    621andy Been here awhile

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    Turkey, Myanmar, or sometimes at home in Germany!
    Great stuff:D
    #9
  10. Navel

    Navel Omphaloskeptical

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    [...stupid internet-connection just cost me the whole installment, lost while uploading]

    That must suck! Thanks for the time and patience to post again, I am enjoying this a lot.
    I rode this summer the Coastal Road from Istanbul to Antakya (-Hatay), and came back through the inner part of the country(Kapadokia...), (but alas not on a bike:(:, hence no ride report). Being my first time in Turkey I liked it very much and was amazed at the kindness of the people, from Antakya we also visited Aleppo (Haleb) in Syria, which is jawdropping, specially the christian quarter of the town, but I am not sure this would be the best timing to visit Syria.

    Thanks again for the report and keep it coming please.
    #10
  11. Tripletreat

    Tripletreat Been here awhile

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    Thanks for posting your report. Your travels are in a part of the world I'm never likely to see otherwise -- and Jawas? Well, not many of those in my neighborhood either! :clap
    #11
  12. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. § 2(3)AVV

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    Thursday morning, after some Espresso in the Hotel room, I took a Taxi to the bike, which was safely parked outside the honorary consulate, and started my boring interstate ride to Gazi Antep. Weather forecast had been rather bad, and indeed in Ankara it was raining heavily all week. But Fazil Bey, the Consul had told me to keep my cool; the weather here on the coast did seldom conform to the state TVs predictions. And right he was.

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    suburbs of Adana; luckily to be passed on the interstate (with toll)

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    further east; on a tyre and a prayer ?

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    actually in town you find quite often that supermarkets or pharmacies are located in the basement of a Mosque - the rent helps for the upkeep. But the tyre shop has some level of awesome, so it's on a interstate parking lot.

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    there are quite some mountains and Tunnels before Gazi Antep
    remark the wind generators on the ridge

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    In Gazi Antep it was work only and I saw hardly anything but the industrial zone, and there basically only one of the factories of our new honorary consul (Yes, one of - his family has got a few and employs 3.500,-- workers. He himself made his post graduate in San Diego)
    Here in the printing installation for plastic foil; beside me Murat, who grew up in Germany and so speaks the language and showed me around and will take care of routine consular matters.
    They do have theyr own gas-powered power station, with 4 20 V- Caterpillar generators and 2 even bigger finnish generators. The beat of those Caterpillars is felt physically like maybe a dozen marching drums


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    Honorary consul (Wikipedia) Some consuls are not career officials of the represented state at all; some are locally-engaged staff with the nationality of the sending country,[2] and in smaller cities, or in cities that are very distant from full-time diplomatic missions, a foreign government which feels that some form of representation is nevertheless desirable may appoint a person who has not hitherto been part of their diplomatic service to fulfill this role. Such a consul may well combine the job with his or her own (often commercial) private activities, and in some instances may not even be a citizen of the sending country. Such consular appointments are usually given the title of honorary consul. Graham Greene used this position as the title of his 1973 novel The Honorary Consul. Notwithstanding their other roles, Honorary Consular Officers (in the widest use of the term) also have responsibility for the welfare of citizens of the appointing country within their bailiwick.[citation needed] Thus, particularly within a port town, an Honorary Consul may be called out (at any time, day or night) to attend to the well-being of a citizen of the appointing country who has been arrested.

    This Wiki-text is not very good, but I prefer it to anything I might cook up; the "honorary" comes from honour, not a honorar


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    Typical Solar water heaters; you can see them in the dozens on all sort of buildings -every appartment has it's own, including plumbing.

    Olive trees; Gazi Antep ("the brave" Antep - because the city folks faught the French, who wanted to take over the area after WW I, hard) is also the capital of Pistachio tree. And one of the fast growing " Anatolian Tiger" Cities.

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    some more resting place mosque
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    But this night I would spent again at a Hydro Electric Powerstation; a Consortium with major austrian participation had build a powerstation on the Euphrat river 50 km east of Gaziantep, just below the giant Atatürk Dam. Now the consortium could exploit the barrage for 16 years, after that it wold fall to the Turkish state.This station was run by Austrians, and I went there to get to know those folks for whom I'm a sort of austrian county secretary sitting in Ankara.



    Sorry, no photos from the dinner or the guest rooms, but it was good. Here we have breakfeast

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    I was in a hurry to get back to Gazi Antep to finish the training programme and to continue on for Hattay (Antakya), where I was to arrive that same day, but of couse we wanted to have a look at the dam.

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    pump station for agricultural irrigation

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    main engine Hall; you see the heads of the turbine shafts; 6 turbines, each 100 + KW; once they had a symphonic orchestra perform here


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    that's an oilpump - and it's for one turbine, not all 6

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    turbine shaft with oil ducts


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    the fall ducts which bring the water to the turbines have a diameter of 8 m each

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    some of the Austrians had gone home for the marriage of a colleague - the rest but one standby duty would leave for that marriage in the afternoon. Those guys were very nice and it was a relaxing stay in their fine camp- and I had learned again a bit more about hydroelectric powerstations.

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    on the way back to Gazi Antep

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    I spent some hours more explaining laws, rights and duties and were to look for informations when needed in Gaziantep, than at about 3 p.m. I hit the road to Antakya.
    Funny was when I had a smokebreak outside and an old gentleman doing likewise asked me, that he had heard I was travelling by motorcycle. I showed him the JAWA in the parking and he meant; " oh, now with this one you will really get to know the country" Gave me his card, " international relations manager"
    We had waited long enough for the thunderstorms to arrive, and when I went into one on the interstate - sun left and right - and I didn't stop immidiately I was soaked within 3 minutes.

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    I turned off the Interstate to follow smaller roads to Antakia; some times rain broke out

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    those two guys served me tea and let me heat up in their gas station office, even if I was only looking for shelter, the tank still quite full.
    But just 300 m down the road when I had left the sky opened the valve again

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    but in the latter afternoon the clouds had passed and I had a nice and uneventfull ride into Hattay.

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    though in Town I managed to get lost completly and in the end needed to hire a taxi to follow to the Hotel where all the participants of the conference were booked.
    I though do have a feeling that I had completly misspronounced the name of Hotel " Soap"

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    soon to come : making pipes for wells and oilpipelines, christian villages on the Syrian border and the beautifull city of Antakya
    #12
  13. nanno

    nanno Been here awhile

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    Nice RR, Andi! Waiting for more to come! :evil
    #13
  14. eurorider1

    eurorider1 Adventurer

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    Excellent ride report, Turkey is a country I would love to ride through. Thanks for the pics :clap
    #14
  15. perterra

    perterra -. --- .--. .

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    This is a great ride along, thanks.
    #15
  16. egret

    egret noob

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    Thank you for another wonderful report Asphaltmueller ! :clap:clap:clap There is something magic about those MZs and Jawas . By the way , how does Jawa handle versus MZ ? Can't wait to read your next installment .:deal
    -zie egret .
    #16
  17. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. § 2(3)AVV

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    Thank you, egret !

    I have an illoustrious visitor at my house ( RTW Doug, doing his Visa run, for which I'm trying to help, being in an Embassy), so no real time to write on the report now.

    the MZ as a one cylinder has more grunt from below, with the Jawa, there's just no power below 2300 r/pm.
    But above that the Jawa has some more pull. Strange enough the Jawa is also more economical when ridden not to hard.

    in the handling department, the Jawa is a bit longer and maybe more stable, while the MZ is maybe handling a bit better in the twisties. They handle both well in my judgement (other bikes recently : Honda Dominator, and a longer ride on a borrowed Pegaso lately)

    My Jawa is not optimally geared, the engine would have the power to run 120 km/h or more on the flat easily, but the gearing makes the r/pms to high. I want to change the front sprocket for a bigger one, as the enclosed rear sprocket doesn't really have options for change. Should work, but maybe for problems with first on very steeep hills. Wll be a trial and error thing
    #17
  18. lefteris

    lefteris fat daddy

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    Great ride so far!

    I am very interested in that part of the world. I have been in the neighborhood in the past, but I definitely want to ride the area east from Gaziantep. The orthodox Syrians and the Armenians, living together with Turks and Kurds have created through the centuries unique places to visit and explore.

    I'm waiting eagerly for the next part of your trip!

    Lefteris
    #18
  19. egret

    egret noob

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    Asphaltmueller ,
    Thank you very much for your MZ/JAWA insight ! I like them both and untill I will be able to afford 2 bikes , I'll secretly dream about them .:ricky
    -zie egret .
    #19
  20. asphaltmueller

    asphaltmueller nomad acc. § 2(3)AVV

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    edith : I'm still typing left hand only and looks like I stumbled over some keys.
    I neither wanted the puke-smiley nor did I want to send the Installment as it is. But to much work for me to nuke it.
    mes excuses



    it's a quiet saturday, and high time to continue the report

    That was 14th may and after a nice breakfeast in the Hotel "Soap" ( an olive soap manufacture from appr. 1860, now turned into a hotel, a bit more luxurious than I would normally choose), we rode in a minibus to the "HatBoru" Factory, where the conference was held.

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    Parliamentary votes approaching - that's the building of the moreless fascist MHP - Party

    arriving in the industrial zone

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    After the official part of the conference we took a look at the factory; hard hat time again

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    here PVC-tubes for wells are made; those can be used for up to a 100m depth, steel ones up to 300m

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    the Company was founded bya turkish family having moved back from Austria. The now Honorary Consul had bought a small tube-making outfit with 8 employees - now they have 350.

    the mountains in the distance already belong to Syria

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    #20