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Steering Head bearing Tools???

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by SnoDrtRider, Mar 15, 2020.

  1. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,024
    Location:
    South Jersey... Close to the Pines
    Does anyone have a source for BMW or equivalent head bearing tools? I am contacting my dealer to price them but I am sure there is a readily made tool or tools out on the open market.

    The part #s are 31 3 721 & 31 3 723


    Screenshot (78).png
    #1
  2. ROMAD

    ROMAD Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    Oddometer:
    201
    Location:
    N.TX
    On other bikes I've worked on, those never need much torque at all, usually finger tight. If I find one I can't take off with fingers usually a light tap with a punch is all it takes to get them moving.

    What's the TQ spec on those in the manual?
    #2
  3. Motoriley

    Motoriley Still riding like crap after all these years.

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,044
    Location:
    Deepest darkest burbs of Montreal
    Brass punch.
    #3
  4. sieg

    sieg Wearing out tires......2 at a time, day after day. Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2008
    Oddometer:
    8,418
    Location:
    Southern Illinois USA
    ^ This or this > v
    $T2eC16R,!)kE9s4Z+llIBQ9FllBJ1Q~~60_35.jpg
    #4
  5. PeterW

    PeterW Long timer

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    Nov 11, 2005
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    4,863
    Location:
    Gold Coast
    They are the same as anyone else's steering head bearings. A real punch (or a cut down chopstick !), a plastic faced hammer and a light touch is a good tool for this and doesn't mark up the adjusters. LIGHT Touch :). The reason that's a good solution is that in most cases you have to dismantle the f***ing bike to be able to use the right tools :dirtdog You may be lucky and your bike is the exception and doesn't have masses of crap obstructing access to the adjusters.

    Tighten until you can just feel resistance (via a pinky on the bar ends) tighten a LITTLE more until it feels a bit stiff (~ 1/32 turn more) but still moves, swing it side to side GENTLY a few times to drive excess grease off the bearings. Back it off, then tighten until you can just feel resistance then lock it there. In theory you don't do the slight overtighten but in practice if you don't they'll be loose again 20k's later. That's like you should also use the right tools but unfortunately it doesn't work well in most cases.
    #5
    bobwolff68 and Motoriley like this.
  6. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,024
    Location:
    South Jersey... Close to the Pines
    I have always used a punch or channel locks but I figured I would do it right for a change...
    I looks like due to the locking ring (1) you need to remove the top fork bridge anyway which is not too difficult a task on these bikes.

    Torque specs...

    Screenshot (79).png
    #6
    lexaria likes this.
  7. bmwroadsterca

    bmwroadsterca RadioFlyer

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2007
    Oddometer:
    1,061
    Location:
    Lanark County near Ottawa ON
    Given the low torque I think that the tool is a candidate for 3D printing. I don't have a bike with this nut but I would be willing to work with someone who does to come up with a design.
    #7
  8. Motoriley

    Motoriley Still riding like crap after all these years.

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2003
    Oddometer:
    3,044
    Location:
    Deepest darkest burbs of Montreal
    Socket and angle grinder? Does anyone have a 1 nm torque wrench?
    #8
  9. MCMXCIVRS

    MCMXCIVRS Long timer

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    Nov 13, 2006
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    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Yes. Like this one. Its actually in in/lbs, but 1nm = 8.8 in/lbs

    [​IMG]

    But really you could just run the top nut down to contact with the rubber washer, then tighten until the notches align and you be fine.
    #9
  10. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,024
    Location:
    South Jersey... Close to the Pines
    I have replaced many steering head bearings through 50 years of riding without the proper tools or a torque wrench... I figured I would do it "By the book" for a change...

    BTW this is what a lower race looks like if you don't keep your bearings tight...

    IMG_20160227_151011596_HDR.jpg
    #10
    flei likes this.
  11. shuswap1

    shuswap1 Long timer

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2014
    Oddometer:
    1,413
    Location:
    British Columbia, Canada
    Replaced the wife's 2013 F700 lower steering stem bearing/race recently. Top bearing/race was fine, greased and reinstalled. The race wasn't all that bad but the (original) bearing was toast, rough, even though it was found well immersed in grease. It wasn't loose, so not sure why it became quite notchy at the 25K Km mark. FWIW I changed the fork oil while in there and that was probably a waste of time. Certainly didn't look anything like some of the truly contaminated oil I've drained from other bikes with less miles.
    #11
  12. heatmizr

    heatmizr n00b-tastic

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2012
    Oddometer:
    838
    Location:
    CLT, NC
    IF that was the original fork oil, I don't think it was a waste. If nothing else, it's good for another 25k!

    SnoDrtRider - was this on either of your newer 750/850's ? I opted to skip the first annual dealer service, and was wondering how imperative it was for me to check the steering head bearings now with ~5,500 miles...
    I have been hearing a single clunk up front only on really hard hits off road, can't imagine that it's the steering bearings (yet) but haven't found anything else it could be either.
    #12
  13. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,024
    Location:
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    No that was on my 650 GS single. a few years ago...
    I gotta say I put new tires on both bikes Labor Day and took both bikes out to scuff in the tires and make sure everything was OK on my wifes bike which I never ride. I thought the clunk on my bike was less or gone and then Saturday we rode 100 miles and I can say the clunk is definitely not as bad...
    I only removed one caliper and the axle... retorquing them when I reinstalled the front wheel.
    #13
  14. DakotaP

    DakotaP Adventurer

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2020
    Oddometer:
    13
    Location:
    Lafayette, LA
    To answer the original question of the part numbers. I searched everywhere for this and had no luck. I got in touch with one of the dealers nearest me and this is what he came up with. Quite pricey for a couple sockets essentially.

    Attached Files:

    #14
  15. AntonLargiader

    AntonLargiader Long timer

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    Totally reasonable for BMW tools.
    #15
  16. AntonLargiader

    AntonLargiader Long timer

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    And let me say now that this steering head design with the two thin locknuts and rubber washer is total POS bullshit. A frontal impact that doesn't even bend the fork tubes will strip the threads on the stem because all of the load is borne by the lower locknut. Seven or eight fine aluminum threads holding an aluminum stem with a loose fit. I have a crashed R nine T in the shop with this damage, I was told about it by another shop who had found the same thing, and a used stem that I bought off eBay had the same damage. The only replacement part you can buy is the lower triple and stem, which is a bargain at $540 for the 850GS, relative to the $7xx price for the R Nine T and S1000 which share the crappy design.

    And all in the name of looking pretty, so that the nut on top lines up with the one on the bottom.
    #16
  17. jrm927

    jrm927 Adventurer Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2019
    Oddometer:
    21
    Location:
    Madison, AL
    Another, possibly more convenient source for the correct tools, though equally expensive is Bike Bandit. Shipping was estimated at 1-2 weeks at this time but now it appears that I'm waiting on the boat... Oh well, I'm not in any hurry. :hmmmmm

    The part numbers are as follows:
    PIN WRENCH - 2735992 (BMW P/N 83302152902) - $50.25
    ADAPTER RING - 4135598 (BMW P/N 83302287420) - $73.95
    #17
  18. AntonLargiader

    AntonLargiader Long timer

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    Why didn't you just get them from your dealer, for the same price?
    #18
  19. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,024
    Location:
    South Jersey... Close to the Pines
    Got this from the UK for $50 shipped the the USA ...
    Haven't used it yet but looks nicely made. PXL_20201114_015123816.jpg
    #19
  20. SnoDrtRider

    SnoDrtRider I've been lost here before...

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2006
    Oddometer:
    7,024
    Location:
    South Jersey... Close to the Pines
    WOW My keyboard is disgusting!
    #20