Steering stabilizer

Discussion in 'Parallel Universe' started by Moab, Aug 3, 2010.

  1. jamesdemien

    jamesdemien Been here awhile

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    I realize my pointer spins so grain of salt here but... Raising the bars more and requiring new brake lines or expecting Scotts to send replacement parts so a stupid plastic pointer that you shouldn't be messing with most of the time can spin seems a bit ludicrous.

    Cut the pointer, throw it in the spare parts bin or take an angle grinder and notch your bars.

    I'm 6'2 and was mildly disappointed that I had to raise the bars as much as I did to install the Scotts. The last thing I'd want is for them to be an inch higher so the pointer could spin.

    The bars were in a good spot for control and feel from the factory. (Insert photo of a dude on a HD with ape hangers.) I feel that raising them to much introduces a whole new set of handling issues by changing the rider position and thus center of mass/gravity to far up and back.

    Think about a mountain bike, a road bike and a ducati. The lower bars on these help position the riders COG closer to the steering head for better control.

    If you're standing on the pegs because your ass is sweaty or you have to fart then 12 inches of bar rise would be ideal. For the gnarly stuff, and I'm disclaiming all of this as my personal opinion, I like to be off the seat just enough to quickly change weight around on the bike and flow with and absorb things. I am not standing with my legs straight wishing the bars were higher and easier to reach. I have my chest and head at or over the bars to drive the front wheel in. In my opinion higher bars could move me out of this sweet spot.

    Anyway, the steering stabilizer is cool.
  2. jamesdemien

    jamesdemien Been here awhile

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    I tried to find a photo of a Dakar bike with huge risers to prove myself wrong. I'm sure there is one somewhere but here's one that helps my opinion instead.

    This is rider is not farting or cooling his sweaty ass.


    [​IMG]
  3. Gumbeaux

    Gumbeaux The Chameleon Supporter

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    +1. :deal Jeebus, it is a wonder anyone wants to sell anything to us...:lol3

    Not only is it cool....it is made in the USA and works.
  4. Shawnee Bill

    Shawnee Bill Long timer Supporter

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    Now you're making a couple of wild assumptions there. :lol3:lol3:lol3

    One of the things I like about the Scots is the rise that comes with it, really helps, another couple of mms would be fine. :clap
  5. jamesdemien

    jamesdemien Been here awhile

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    Another couple mms may be fine and bar height is certainly a personal preference.

    I'm not trying to be a douche or start anything with anyone. It my assumption that if one is adding an expensive bit to their bike thats designed to improve performance then one would also care about other slight things that change the handling characteristics.

    BMW could have increased the head angle and the f8 would plow though everything including the hard corner you would prefer to turn through. Adding a steering stabilizer helps counteract the twitchiness that comes with quick steering geometry.

    This is from the Scotts website. It's subtle, but almost apologetic.

    "This is also good for the taller rider who wants his bars a little higher, as it raises the bar location about 20-25mm. In some cases, you might consider a lower bend handlebar bend at the same time, unless you are trying to achieve a higher bar height, along with your stabilizer installation."

    I read that as we're trying to find something positive about the fact that this mount just screwed with your geometry, if you're into that cool, if not you're probably going to have to spend more money on new bars to get it back to perfect.

    Then James Renazco

    "At the price of more rise..."

    Please understand I am not trying to start anything with anyone, I am sort of a shithead and its difficult to convey sarcasm in writing.

    I just think if what we're talking about is seriously compromising handling while installing something that improves handling to ensure a little plastic pointer spins freely we may all be missing the point.
  6. The Griz

    The Griz Long timer Supporter

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    Yeah, I was a bit overzealous with my earlier comment regarding getting a replacement. I agree, it is ridiculous to expect something like that. The Scotts is a superior product. It looks amazing, build quality and finish is second to none, and it performs even better!

    Just and FYI, the knob already has an indicator built into it. Observe the little silver allen screw that threads into the top of the knob (kind of out of focus in this pic, but still visible):

    [​IMG]


    I personally have already found my base valve sweet spot, therefore I will be leaving the pointer on and untrimmed. This gives me three clicks adjustment in both directions from my sweet spot. More than enough.

    Life is good.
  7. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    What is that pointer made of that prohibits cutting off the little bit that interferes with the bar?
  8. dendrophobe

    dendrophobe Motorbike Junky

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    Plastic? :dunno
  9. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks House Ape

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    It's made of Polyethylene Terephthalate (also known as "plastic"), and the only thing that prevents us from cutting the nib is inertia. :lol3
  10. ride2little

    ride2little Riding Like the Wind

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    I buzzed mine down with the bench grinder. It did not take much. I still have the pointer and can spin it all the way around to tweak it just right. Took all of 5 minutes.
  11. itsatdm

    itsatdm Long timer

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    I am embarrassed:razor
  12. jamesdemien

    jamesdemien Been here awhile

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    No problem Griz.



    ...after letting a few people ride my bike I wish that the thing wouldn't spin because they always give it back cranked all the way up.

    As Griz mentioned, once you have the sweet spot +/- a click or two is all you need.
  13. rockinrog

    rockinrog Long timer

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    Hey guys as usual my technical skills leave quite a bit to be desired.
    I am attempting to install my Scotts.
    Step 4 Remove the stock lowerbar mounts by loosening the nuts on the bottom of the triple clamp.....

    So how/what did you guys get in there to loosen them? I can't get my wrench or ratchet in there... not enough clearance between the nuts and the body work.
  14. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks House Ape

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    I used a box wrench. But it was a tight fit.
  15. BMW_BIKER_KEITH

    BMW_BIKER_KEITH Been here awhile

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    Simply HOLD the (hard to get to) lower Nut with a box wrench.
    Then, with a Torx bit on a Ratchet, loosen the Bolt from the top!
  16. rockinrog

    rockinrog Long timer

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    Thanks guys thats what I am attempting to do now... but a 17mm seems to be a touch too big and a 15 is a touch too small and I am not sure a 16mm even exist....lol... ok one more try then I'm calling it quits for the night.
  17. ba_

    ba_ Long timer

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    I think it is the 16mm. I remember because that isn't a size I normally keep in my tool kit for the bike. I had to dig in another bag to find that size.
  18. rockinrog

    rockinrog Long timer

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    Thanks guys that part was rather easy once I got things started.(used a 17 to hold the nut)

    Now putting the sub mount on... the way the bolts sit down inside the sub mount it looks like getting a socket or wrench down on the bottom nut is the only way of getting them tightened back up.

    16mm must be a rare size. I bet we have 100 sockets in the tool box and so far not a 16 to be found and my wrenches skip from 15 to 17 also.

    Edit: I am starting to think that Scotts being an American company they may not have used metric.
  19. rockinrog

    rockinrog Long timer

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    Ok so an 11/16 fit them pretty much perfect.

    Now the question I have is.... it said to tighten the nuts until you have 2-3 threads showing but not to let the top bushing come in contact with the triple tree.
    Going by feel I have 1 thread maybe a little more showing but the bushing is almost touching the tripple tree.... So should I tighten them down till I have at least 2 threads showing no matter what I am seeing up top??...I would sure hate it if the bars came off while I was riding.
  20. WoodWorks

    WoodWorks House Ape

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    I'd stop right there. IIRC the nut has a little recess, so 2-3 showing may match the "feel" of one. In any case, you want to have some bushing showing.