Stewart/Cassiar Hwy B.C. 37

Discussion in 'Canada' started by pnwroamer, Dec 20, 2004.

  1. pnwroamer

    pnwroamer Adventurer

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    New poster here, forgive me if this is in archives or another thread.

    Am looking to do a loop fr. Seattle to Skagway, then ferry down to Prince Rupert and "road it" back to Seattle. Have heard/ read conflicting info. on whether or not Hwy. 37 B.C. is "entirely" paved at this point (from Yellowhead to Al-Can Hwys.). Insights/tips would be appreciated. Will be doing this on an FJR1300 (but may end up on a V-strom 1000 by then) Looking to go last week of June 05.

    ...thanks in advance to respondees!
    #1
  2. Beemermcr

    Beemermcr Big, Dumb, Happy!

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    Others can say how much, but can be a handful in the rain.
    Great area to ride! Other route back is fully paved.
    Paul
    #2
  3. markjenn

    markjenn Long timer

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    I've only ridden 37 as far N as the turnoff to Stewart/Hyder - it's completely paved up to this point. N of this, I recall that it was about 50-50 paved/gravel up to the Alcan, at least a few years ago.

    I'd be hesitant about doing this on a FJR. It would probably make it, but if it rains in those deep woods, it could be awfully snotty. And it rains a lot up there. If you could be assured of a dry road, I'd feel better about doing it.

    Perfect for a big single or GS though.

    - Mark
    #3
  4. Scalzitti

    Scalzitti Adventure Driven

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    I did the Cassier Highway in June 2003 on my 2001 BMW R1200C. For the most part the road was in very good conditon. I'd say only about 25 to 30 miles of ass puckering sections spread out over a hundred miles are so. It had been drizzling for a few days, so it was a little slick in spots, but not bad. Definitely not greasy. I almost got scarred away by all of the negative things I had heard about the road, but it was some of the most challenging and hence most rewarding riding that I did that summer. In my mind and for my very basic skill level, the loose deep dirt on the Top Of The World Highway outside of Chicken was tougher for me. Go there, have fun and take pictures. I have a few that I'll post if I can find them. Posting ride reports somehow always manages to fall off off my to do list, but I'll keep on trying.
    On my 03 trip I continued on to the Fraser Canyon Highway and then the Crows Nest Highway. Both are terrific motorcycle road with wonderful scenery. Put those on your list also. I'll be back riding all 3 highways this summer!
    #4
  5. pnwroamer

    pnwroamer Adventurer

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    Thanks for "heads ups".

    Browsed in 2003 ed. Mileposts at B&N and they say 80% paved/ 20% unpaved with more improvements to be done in summer '04 (this past summer). Next edition of Mileposts not slated to be out for a couple months so I'll assume there are still some "improved"-unpaved sections.

    The Feejer may have to be replaced by a "Big Trailie" as I'm ready to venture beyond pavements end. Love the bike, just contemplating a move on to something different....., good for 500+ mile days, and suitable for sedate dirt/gravel F.S. type roads and easy to moderately negotiated two track.

    thanks again!
    #5
  6. Mully

    Mully Kineticist

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    It's not challenging at all for a GS/KLR/KTM, but you might find it's pretty bumpy for an FJR. The only place it can be challenging is if you get into a road repair section: they basically rip up the macadam, start with a layer of heavy rock, put a middle layer of gravel over it, and finish up with a layer of fine stuff which is rolled and sprayed with 'chipseal'. If you get there before its rolled, it can be a beyotch. :eek1

    The terrain, scenery, and atmosphere are not to be missed if you think you're up to it........ :D

    mully
    #6
  7. marty hill

    marty hill The Energizer Bunny

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    Hey pnw,

    I'm planning the same route a couple of weeks before you. Have fun.
    #7
  8. MANXMAN

    MANXMAN Overlander

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    I passed more touring bikes (RT's, Goldwings, Harleys, ect.) than I did GS's or KLR's on my way up the Cassiar. It wasn't totally paved when I rode it, I would say about 20% was gravel or under construction. Although it can be interesting in the rain on those chewed-up sections, any bike can do it.

    There is some great scenery and lots of bear and moose to take pictures of. You could go up the Alaska Highway if you would like to avoid the gravel sections, but it doesn't offer the same sense of solitude as the Cassiar.

    Manxman
    #8
  9. pnwroamer

    pnwroamer Adventurer

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    #9
  10. Taxguy

    Taxguy Adventurer

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    I'll be on that road in May going to the Hyderseek event in Hyder.

    Has anyone done the road into Telegraph Creek, I'm told its a beautiful spot but as I am on a sportbike I am hesitant to try it.
    #10
  11. Davey R.

    Davey R. Adventurer

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    In 96 the Cassier was pretty undeveloped and my 95 BMW K1100 LTA was more than able to accomodate the road. It did so well it decided to take me up to Prudoe Bay and back
    #11
  12. northrider

    northrider Traveler

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    I rode up the Cassiar last summer on a KLR. The other posts are about right. There is no appreciable gravel between Kitwanga and the Stewart turnoff. Although you never know where they will decide to rip things up next Summer. I did not go out to Stewart/Hyder so I'm not sure what you will find on that streach. I did hit significant rain when going on the dirt though and it WILL get greasy in the construction zones. One such zone was 40 miles long last year. All in all it was a good ride and I liked it more than the Alcan. Hope you have fun too!

    Mark
    #12
  13. gtcoop

    gtcoop Adventurer

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    #13
  14. Lone Rider

    Lone Rider Registered User

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    I rode up the AK Hwy and down the Cassiar this last summer. Next trip I will go up and down the Cassiar. It's very cool.
    #14
  15. Nelson

    Nelson Shadow Boxer

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    Telegraph Creek is amazing, there is an original Hudson's Bay trading post there that still runs as a store. The Stikine river valley will take your breath away but so will the ride down the canyon. Single lane gravel for quite a bit and getting down into the canyon is easy. Coming back in the rain on anything less than a dual sport I would personally not reccomend. You will also need to camp outside of Telegraph Creek and check with the band office and the "lost" tibe of Americans that may still run the store.
    Do it and post pictures, all I have is video tape.
    :thumb

    #15
  16. arroyoshark

    arroyoshark Needing some space

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    It's about 70 miles from Dease Lake down to Telegraph Creek. I've been up the Cassier twice and each time it was raining like crazy when I got to Dease Lake. Tried some of the road down to Telegraph Cr. on a Transalp, but it was too muddy and slippery. Road gets steep, narrow & rocky farther down. Probably can be done on sport bike, but be careful, most especially if it's wet and rainy.

    There is a decent motel at Dease Lake and a good restaurant adjacent to it. Also a bar at the motel. There are motels and camping at Stewart, B.C.
    #16
  17. Taxguy

    Taxguy Adventurer

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    I'm thinking that I will try Telegraph Creek, but may add another bike to the stable rather than trying on my ZX9. Thanks for the input.
    #17
  18. kildala2000

    kildala2000 The GS Store.

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    Hello pnwroamer, :D

    I live only 1 .5 hours drive from Kitwanga junction. I travel to Stewart for day trips at least once or twice a year on my Adv. Road is great and a must do. As for the rest of the road past there to Watson lake. Two years ago on our trip up to Alaska was one of those rainy trips. Even with knobbie tires on some parts of the road we hit mud so deep it was hard to keep up any speed. Very slow going and we even hit snow in June. Last year the raod was excellent exept for the construction zones. Like others say 80% payvment 20% gravel. I would go for it. New set of tires and you are ready to go. Enjoy the ferry trip!

    Ride Safe,
    Rick :thumb
    #18
  19. oldgoat

    oldgoat n00b

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    Went from Kitwanga to Watson Lake in Aug '03. It rained in the northern part & the stretches of road under repair or with a rolled gravel surface were very muddy, but smooth. Not deep mud, but a liquid film on the rolled base. I was in a Toyota Highlander (sorry about that) & after a while you could not tell what colour it was. A camper heading south & towing his car was a real messy sight! Most of the bikes I saw were 'Harley' type ones.

    Went to Stewart ok, but Hyder has no paved roads & large pot-holes. Carry on thru Hyder to see the bears catching & eating salmon. They have a timber walkway for you to stand on & watch. Continue even further & climb somewhat to get a stupendous view of a large glacier.

    Saw an older guy on a V-Strom with hard luggage & a spare rear tire strapped on top of the rear case. That put the yearning for one in my mind:D
    #19
  20. pnwroamer

    pnwroamer Adventurer

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    thanks for the helpful insights all!

    The V-Strom is taking on a growing appeal when considering this "venture".
    Maybe it's time to say g'bye to the FJR and learn to admire the scenery under triple digits :rofl
    #20