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Stock KTM can temp vs Wings can temp

Discussion in 'Thumpers' started by BoulderBoy, Jun 29, 2020.

  1. BoulderBoy

    BoulderBoy Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Boulder, Colorado
    In a humble attempt to provide something more tangible than saying the stock 690/701's pipe is really hot, I brought an infrared temp gauge along for back-to-back laps - one with the stocker, and one with an aftermarket. Short story, the stock can at the back weld measured 210-220-degrees, and the Wings was 110-120-degrees at the same spot. Interestingly, the carbon tip was much hotter at 175-degrees, which is still ~50-degrees cooler than the stock can in that area.

    14.5mi route that climbed 3000ft, with the last mile being a dirt road with an average grade of 14.5%.

    I also measured the stock heat shield against the carbon Wings, and the stocker was actually cooler at 95-degrees verses ~130-degrees.

    Video posted on YouTube if you're interested:
    #1
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  2. Eresia

    Eresia Adventurer

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2019
    Oddometer:
    69
    Location:
    Italy
    Regarding the carbon tip, since it's black it will provide a more accurate reading than the steel or titanium surfaces of the exhausts, they have different emissivity, plus reading temperatures with infrared from shiny surfaces is prone to under-readings unless you employ some trick.

    As long as we are just looking at the Delta Temperature between exhausts you can disregard the above considerations, they are both shiny surfaces, and have similar emissivity values (very low, around 0.1), but if you also look at the carbon tip you need to adjust for it since it has a high emissivity value (around 0.9)

    Table of emissivity value for metals reference

    Table for non metals
    #2
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  3. BoulderBoy

    BoulderBoy Been here awhile

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Oddometer:
    216
    Location:
    Boulder, Colorado
    That could be a good explanation on why the carbon heat shield was measuring warmer than the stock, shiny alloy shield. Otherwise, yep, it's basically shiny to shiny and the variant is what I was most curious about.
    #3
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  4. Garnet Grylls

    Garnet Grylls Old Low and Slow

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Oddometer:
    119
    Location:
    Victoria BC
    Try using a contact thermometer like a meat thermometer you use for cooking.

    Don't tell your wife.
    #4
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  5. blalor

    blalor Been here awhile Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2015
    Oddometer:
    875
    Location:
    RVA
    Not super scientific, and I had similar issues getting sensical, consistent readings, but I think the difference is still noticeable, and notable, too, is how hot the plastic is with the stock exhaust.

    0FFF1F3C-9F07-4A5A-BCAD-3EBEF6FBB98C.jpeg 9FE5DBAF-A56E-44C3-AEEC-8192C259F519.jpeg E0D71614-12E9-4DC3-8EEC-9DAA38A2B00F.jpeg BD6B30F0-A3B7-4AFD-87AC-B20A440DD038.jpeg
    #5