Stoves

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by ibgary, Jul 3, 2015.

  1. kag

    kag Wander Lust

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    Does it look like the flame on the left? If so not much to worry about but......

    These things Rarely need any service......like once every 20 years or more. Spray oven cleaner down around the flame jet area in the flame bowl and let it set for a while. Of course dump the tank first. Then blow it out with compressed air. Open the valve also....may have a little piece of carbon. Might try a little premium pump gas in it....thats what I run. These things are super simple to take apart....you will not hurt it.

    If that does not fix it you can get a rebuild kit.....like $20 on ebay

    (Not mine....stolen from Google)
    [​IMG]
  2. jsb223

    jsb223 ADV Rookie

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    Are the ones (123's) available today as good as the older ones or should I hold out for a classic?
  3. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

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    I can compare old vs new, and I don't see a big difference. The older model, which doesn't have the self cleaning jet needle built in, is said to simmer better, but I personally don't see the difference... but, the older model 123 is genuine Made-In-Sweden, whereas the newer 123R model is made in Taiwan or China. That matters to me, although the 123R seems unaffected by the quality control issues that affected the Optimus Nova stove model (lots about that on-line as they had a recall).
  4. kag

    kag Wander Lust

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    I have an older one....the guy I got it from had it it for long time and he got it from a guy that had it for a long time. That is why those of us that have them and use them, love them. They just work. I think if you can get an older one, do so. But if you get a new one it will work great also.....your kids and grand kids potentially will be using it.
  5. mslim

    mslim If it's worth doing... it's worth overdoing

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    First of all many thanks for the response and the pix. Good illustration.

    To address several of your points, I bought my 123 new from LL Bean's in the '70's for about $20 . Several years later I bought my wife a 123R as that was all that was available at that time. Both got a fair amount of use in the mountains of GA and NC.

    As I was preparing for a trip to the Sierras this summer, I knew I didn't have the odd shaped tool to rebuild the caps so I sent them both to A&H Enterprises for a complete rebuild. I probably didn't need to rebuild both of them but I figured both stoves had earned a rebuild after 30-40 years of faithful service. It wasn't cheap. It ran about $104 for both including return postage. As you said, the rebuild kits would have been $55 by themselves so I guess it wasn't out of line.

    re: the pix.... My flames look like the SVEA in the middle, mostly blue with slight orange tips as opposed to the stove in the foreground (Optimus??) that has completely blue flames. I have always burned Coleman fuel in the Sveas and have not had any issues with clogging. Once in a while I'll use the little needle tool on the 123 just as preventive maintenance.

    So back to the original query... If my SVEA 123 flames look like the stove in the middle, does it need any further tweaking or adjustment to get maximum efficiency out of the fuel or is it working as designed?
  6. bjorn240

    bjorn240 Good with a map!

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    The flames from my 123R look basically like the ones in the middle when on full boil. If I turn it down, they're just blue. Largely, if it looks like that, I think you're fine.

    Love my 123 by the way; I sometimes use the Snow Peak canister stove when I go with the kids in the summer; otherwise I use my old Svea.
  7. mslim

    mslim If it's worth doing... it's worth overdoing

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    Ok thanks! That's the answer I was looking for. My rebuilt stove does the same. I guess the stove is in good nick and I won't fool with it any more. It did function well on my recent camping trip.

    Slim
  8. Grinnin

    Grinnin Forever N00b Supporter

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    While I agree that the Svea is a great and reliable stove, there can be problems with used ones. If the PO burnt the stove until the tank was dry, they could have burnt the cotton wick inside the fuel tank. Used to be that the regular maintenance pack had a needle, jet, valve, packing, and a new wick.

    And for you new users: don't burn the stove until the tank is dry. May work a few times with no trouble, but . . .

    As far as older vs. newer: Originally Svea stoves needed a wire to clean the jet. Then they updated to a "shaker jet" that had a wire above the needle valve so shaking the stove up and down cleaned the jet. The latest type has a wire on the needle valve so opening the valve fully pushes the wire through the jet. They all work fine but for my money the latest is the simplest. Mine was originally a shaker-jet type but a maintenance pack with the latest cleaning needle fit fine.
  9. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

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    Speaking of old Optimus stoves... I just acquired this little Optimus 8R Hunter box stove, which nicely compliments the Optimus 111 Hiker I've had for 30+ years. The 8R is very similar to the Svea 123R in that it doesn't utilize a pump, instead relying on heat from the burner to warm up the tank to push fuel, and it has the built in cleaning needle too. Not sure if it uses a wick tho (like the Svea 123 does). I just tested it - works great, but not a huge output (it is a tiny stove after all). The 111 Hiker on the other hand really puts out, and I like the factory quiet burner head.

    [​IMG]
    Retired Army 2008 likes this.
  10. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

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    Cheap Chinese stove... a cautionary tale. I recently bought one of the Chinese BSR-8 multifuel "Booster" stoves to try out. I bought it used from an eBay seller, but you can buy them from a wide variety of sources.

    http://www.dx.com/p/brs-8-multi-functional-oil-gas-stove-90761#.VehUuvZViko

    Upon receipt I went out to test it, and was shocked to discover it leaked fuel badly from two locations... the pump, and the control valve, which is located in the Lindal type valve assembly. This was very dangerous - I didn't dare light it. Luckily the seller accepted a return. I'm sure some of the Chinese made stoves are good quality and a decent buy - this one IMO is not one of them, and it convinced me to stick with MSR and Primus stove (quality!).
  11. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    I've had an 8R since I bought it new in the late 60s for $12.00 new. Thing still works great. I have added a couple of other stoves like the Brunton equivalent to your 111, which i have yet to use, and a Brunton Optimus Nova MultiFuel Expedition Stove that I do use.
  12. GreatWhiteNorth

    GreatWhiteNorth Long timer

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    How's that Optimus Nova working out for you? Do you know whether yours was made in China or Sweden, as that determined if it was affected by the recall? Here's a good article on that business BTW: http://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.ca/2011/03/stove-of-week-optimus-nova.html

    I just ordered a Primus Omnifuel 2, and a BernieDawg quiet cap silencer.
  13. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    Thanks for the link! I will have to go look at mine to see where it was made. No idea about the recall.
  14. mslim

    mslim If it's worth doing... it's worth overdoing

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    UPDATE FWIW: I spoke to the repair guy today at A&H and he said the orange tips are normal at full tilt on the SVEA. He also said the stove is not at peak efficiency when you have the orange tips.

    He said the way to get the most heat out of your fuel was to dial the valve back a skosh until it was at max blue flames. I didn't know that for all these years, so I'll be doing that in the future.

    Slim
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  15. Emoto

    Emoto Sure, why not?

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    Blue is the cleanest burn. You can see it on how much soot is (not) deposited on your pans when the flame is blue. My aversion to washing dishes cause me to notice this early on. :lol3
  16. kohburn

    kohburn Long timer

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  17. Stan_R80/7

    Stan_R80/7 Beastly Gnarly

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    The Biolite sounds messy, fragile, and expensive. But, maybe it's not. If the military or search & rescue have used them, then the 'fragile' part has been worked out.

    Hands down, the Trangia stove is the simplest. Interestingly, if ethanol is burned in a Trangia stove the boil times are a bit faster but some soot is deposited on the pot. Methanol produces a blue flame with no soot, but the boil times are a bit slower.

    I will probably measure the boil times on my Svea at the two flame colors to see which gives the fastest boil. Compared to the mess made when using wood, a bit of soot is not significant IMO.
  18. kohburn

    kohburn Long timer

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    I'm a big fan of alchohal stoves for certain circumstances. I had a lot of fun experimenting with making them from soda and beer cans. they work exceptionally well with a pot that has a heatsink on the bas like the jetboil or optimus pots.

    with a jetboil cup and one bottle cap of alchohal I can boil a liter of water in under 3 minutes or I can toss on the simmer ring and simmer for 15 minutes (perfect for steam baking brownies or muffins). with my home made setup. just using denatured alchohal from the hardware store.

    I just liked the concept of the biolite for motorcycle/car camping rather than backpacking to be able to grill or boil using random debris
  19. ibgary

    ibgary Long timer

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    I made 2 or 3, then ordered one from Mini Bull. Now I've switched to the 12-10 and Caldera Cone, by Trail Design. The caldera (titanium) is also great for wood burning.

    Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
  20. bfly

    bfly Adventurer

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    I've made a few different alcohol stoves as well. I found the Mini Bull type side burners to be too gas hungry and needed a wider pot to work well. With my 700ml pot the flames of the side burner type stoves would be lapping the sides of the pot instead of the bottom. I made an eFREVO stove and really liked the capillary action and center burn. The stove blooms in a few seconds and the center flame works great with a small pot. The only problem with the eFREVO is it is pretty fragile. I wound up buying a Toaks alcohol stove which is a titanium capillary stove like the eFREVO but a lot stronger.

    Of course all of this is mute since I only use alcohol stoves when backpacking. On the bike I use a Jetboil MiniMo. Easy to use and you can actually simmer with it.