Stoves

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by ibgary, Jul 3, 2015.

  1. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    The Adjustafork is absolutely brilliant, so long as you can have a fire. It's a simple design with a great execution. With it I should be able to stretch out a 110g gas canister for 2+ weeks of use.

    This is the reason I tried the MSR Seagull 1.1L pot, then the Stanley Adventure cook pot... dual use... they work in the fire (thicker albeit heavier stainless vs. Ti) and on the stove. The Stanley pot fits better on my micro back up stove (Fire Maple FMS-300T), is suitable for using in a fire or on coals, holds a 110g canister, and with the aforementioned Fat Daddio mini bread pan I can dry bake with it.
  2. AZQKR

    AZQKR Long timer

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    Question for the member highly enlightened on stoves and fuel--------

    I have regular gas msr bottles, no stove, no connector on msr bottles for connecting to a stove.

    Is it possible to find the top part for my msr bottles that then will connect to a camp stove? I see pi9cs of thye msr bottles connected but they have some type of connector my tops do not have

    Thanks, I'd like to be able to use my msr bottles for fuel. And understand some stoves will use unleaded gas among other heat sources.

    Recommendations for the adaptor top for msr gas bottles,, which fuel to use and small camp stoves this set up will accommodate?

    Thanks in advance
    Eatmore Mudd likes this.
  3. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    This is the cook kit I think I've finally settled on to complement the Adjustafork:

    * Stanley Adventure cook pot w/bail
    * GSI (or cheap equivalent) cup w/homemade cozy
    * Fire Maple FMS-300T stove
    * Fat Daddio pan (optional)
    * 110g canister
    * Crown Royal bag to stuff it all in

    The whole setup with the Adjustafork comes in around $85.
  4. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    Your MSR bottles are for white gas ( Coleman fuel). White gas stoves with a bottle require a pump. To use them to connect to a stove you'll need:
    * a stove that uses a white gas remote bottle
    * a pump that is for that stove

    I have read that Optimus stoves dont play well with Optimus bottles. To use your bottle (s) you'd need an MSR stove such as the Whisperlite.
    AZQKR likes this.
  5. nvklr

    nvklr Been here awhile

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    I currently own several stoves, pots, cups, sporks, well, you get the idea. I've rarely used any of it on a bike trip, but hopefully that will change very soon. Again thank you for sharing your knowledge and experiences. Here in Nevada we ofter are on fire restriction, but I'm going to order that Adjusafork anyway.
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  6. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    NVKLR, fire restrictions are precisely why I'm trying to figure out a complementary cook kit - one that will suffice as a stand alone, as well as complement the Adjustafork.
  7. nvklr

    nvklr Been here awhile

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    When you purchase a stove that runs off of liquid fuel it will come with everything you need to work with your MSR bottles, usually a pump that screws into the MSR type bottles and hose and the stove itself.

    Example: https://www.amazon.com/MSR-WhisperL...e&qid=1556507497&s=gateway&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

    or: https://www.amazon.com/Primus-OmniF...d7c73c9ad9bdb&qid=1556507761&s=gateway&sr=8-2

    just two examples of the many that are out there.
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  8. nvklr

    nvklr Been here awhile

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  9. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    I have looked at that pot with interest. It has a silicone seal, so it won't work for dry baking or in a fire. It's reportedly a field quasi-pressure cooker that's excellent for cooking rice. Note: I've been able to cook brown rice and lentils as I've previouy noted in this thread with a regular pot.

    Can you remove the silicone seal, and if so will the latches hold the lid on? If so, that and the Fat Daddio pan would be a great combination.
  10. nvklr

    nvklr Been here awhile

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    The seal is removable, it's attached to the inner container and the lid does indeed stay on and is snug with the seal removed. (in case you read this before I edited it, I just had to go out to the shed and retrieve it and brought it in to check) It does an ok job at cooking rice, but seems to take longer than the 20 or so minutes I'm used to just boiling/simmering rice on the kitchen stove.
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  11. BluegrassPicker

    BluegrassPicker Been here awhile Super Supporter

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    Me Too!
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  12. clintnz

    clintnz Trans-Global Chook Chaser

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    As above, any MSR liquid fuel stove will come with a pump that screws into your MSR bottles. The two most popular would be the Whisperlite & the Dragonfly. Both are really good stoves. Both will run on white gas/coleman fuel or unleaded petrol. IMHO the Dragonfly burns unleaded more cleanly than the Whisperlite, plus it has much better simmer control - but it is quite loud compared to the Whisperlite. They will both run cleaner on white gas - I tend to use that in my Dragonfly if I'm hiking & may be using it inside huts, but when moto touring it just gets fed unleaded.

    Cheers
    Clint
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  13. molochnik

    molochnik Cold Deist

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    I've been searching out sterno stoves and Ti cookware. Haven't found anything that satisfies my curiosity.
    When I was a broke kid my friends and I used the collapsible Sterno stoves for hiking. They seemed to work well and much less hassle than a fire. One of my buddies is a Brit so he often used it for random tea breaks...but I digress
    Does anyone out there use those stoves and sterno anymore? I've used mine on a couple of recent trips and I find it easy to pack and use, still. I typically only warm up a can of beans or boil some water for a dehydrated meal...like in the olden days. I don't get anywhere close to some of the gourmet stuff I've been reading about in my searches.
    More to the point, if anyone IS using sterno with Ti cookware (just got myself a small Snow Peak set) is there any more or less trouble with the hotspots I read about? Any more or less trouble with cleanup since sterno isn't as aggressive a heating source as some of the other rigs out there (or a fire)?
    Any tricks to keeping pure Ti cookware easy to clean up?
    Thanks.
  14. Gunerdo

    Gunerdo fromwanerbe

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    Stainless steel pot scourer, as food will get burnt to the bottom of the pot, sooner rather than later.
    Only thing I haven't burnt is water. Trying to like Titanium, but its hard to cook with, IMO.
  15. DeGraafvanSalland

    DeGraafvanSalland De Graaf van Salland

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  16. Kinsman

    Kinsman Ribs....for her pleasure

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    A fire is a nice luxury but usually by the time I get to camp and make my bed, it's getting late and I'm tired. I want to cook and eat with minimal hassle. So, a stove. And something filling with protein.

    That, and a whiskey and cigar.
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  17. HeadTrauma

    HeadTrauma ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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    I could never find it for what I thought was a reasonable price. It's effectively just gelled alcohol in a can. I think alcohol stoves 1.) perform similarly, 2.) are easier to find fuel for, 3.) produce less waste, and 4.) cost less.

    Ti performs much like very thin stainless. It has poor heat distribution and stoves with decent output will make serious hot spots. Alcohol stoves make it easier to prevent that, but still require close attention. My titanium pan is an old first-gen Evernew I got in early 2004 for long-haul backpacking and only reluctantly use it even for that. The "non-stick" coating was crap and earned them the nickname Everglue. I burned the coating off with a torch and it actually works slightly better. Mine is used mostly as a dinner plate while 99% of actual cooking is done my other one, a GSI anodized non-stick aluminum. They work fine for boiling stuff. Not much else IMO. I can't see the weight reduction being worth the cost to cooking performance when a motorcycle is carrying it for you.
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  18. PNWet

    PNWet Been here awhile

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    I have found that with an ultra low simmer stove I can cook just about anything I want. A stove with really good flame control is easy to cook with, whether it be Ti or HA Aluminum. The two stoves I have found that have exceptional flame control are: Fire Maple FMS300T (canister) and Trangia (alcohol), though the Trangia takes more practice.
    MYUMPH likes this.
  19. HeadTrauma

    HeadTrauma ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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    For kicks I just made scrambled eggs on my Peak 1 model 400 using 1/2 teaspoon coconut oil in my aforementioned stripped Everglue Ti pan. Stuck and overcooked immediately on the lowest flame setting. Just like old times. That was in still air; it would be even harder to control if there was a breeze. My single old non-original pan does not represent all uncoated titanium cookware of course, but its performance does seem fairly typical.
  20. appliance57

    appliance57 Long timer

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    I use this http://kovea.com/product/dual-flame/ a broad flame, great flame control and quiet.