Stoves

Discussion in 'Camping Toys' started by ibgary, Jul 3, 2015.

  1. Maggot12

    Maggot12 U'mmmm yeaah!!

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    I believe I saw titanium ones on aliexpress. I haven't seen the square fuel blocks up here. Just round one and they look smaller.

  2. MrPulldown

    MrPulldown Long timer

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    Done. Took a few trips to the hardware store to acquire a large stainless steel washer, E clip, cable, and many swagges.

    I started with a Primus classic trail stove. Then I added an old aluminum pot as the hanging frame. A center hole drilled to match the diameter of the stove's stem. There is a handy notch in the steam that took a E-clip.
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    Drilled a few holes so that you could light the stove through. Then fished cables to hang. The cables are set up as 2 loops that are carabinered together. This is how Tommy Caldwell had his set up on the Dawn Wall. Getting the pot level was the most difficult part of the project. I made the cable on the shorter side for limited space hanging. You can enchain more biners to get more length if needed.
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    That one side hole was my first attempt at a flame access hole. Here is my my brother testing the unit in is apartment. I made this unit to fit his GSI soloist cooking pot. I was concerned about the fold down handle interfering, but it looks like it was made for it.
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  3. PNWet

    PNWet Long timer

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    I inherited a couple gallons of white gas, which added to what I already had means I have a lot just sitting around.

    Because of this I've been cooking more on my Omnilite Ti, mostly presoaked brown rice and lentils.

    Add 1/2 c each + 2 bouillon cubes to a 16 oz throw away plastic bottle. Fill almost full with water. Let sit for several hours up to a couple days.

    Dump contents into pot (with that stove I generally use an MSR Seagull 1.1). Fill bottle with water and add to pot. Bring to boil. Simmer for 20 mins as low as possible. Turn bottle over. Let it run out of gas, let it sit for another 15 - 20 mins. Total cook time is about an hour. Add sriracha to taste.
  4. kimzx1000r

    kimzx1000r Been here awhile

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    Both are Optimus stoves, One is a multi fuel and one is a mini unit. I typically travel with the multi fuel. When I stop for gas I just drain the hose into my bottle, if my bottle is really low and I don' get enough I just grab another hose and drain it. Normally it only takes one! Simple, easy, works in any temp! My son approves!

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  5. Madman4049

    Madman4049 Been here awhile

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    Is that the Polaris Optifuel? I love mine, my Crux lives in the daypack but the Optifuel is my go to for trips.
  6. kimzx1000r

    kimzx1000r Been here awhile

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    Madman, yes it is. It is also my go to stove, absolutely love it. Fantastic stove. I love that I can use anything in it. Since I got it I have taken it on every trip. Not the lightest, but light enough! :beer
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  7. anotherguy

    anotherguy Long timer

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    Posted elsewhere. An old friend and true old school. A reassuring roar to make coffee with in the morning.

    [​IMG]
  8. MEDIC-0372

    MEDIC-0372 Been here awhile

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    I like my Coleman Peak. Its small, cheap and works great. Fuel is available almost everywhere.

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  9. ObiJohn

    ObiJohn Screaming Banshee Supporter

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    Like many of you, I also have several stoves... some bought for utilitarian purposes, some bought for curiosity. That includes some Coleman single-burner camp stoves, a couple of different sizes of Solo Stove twig burners, and a Trangia 77 cookset with alcohol burner. For moto camping, I can carry a heavier stove without having to deal with tradeoffs. My stove of choice has been a Coleman Featherlite 442 dual-fuel. It runs off of Coleman fuel/white gas, or off of unleaded gas... and a couple of feet of clear plastic siphon hose lets me fuel it from my bike's tank (I carry an MSR pint bottle of CF and use that first.) Like all Coleman single-burner camping stoves, it starts immediately, heats well, lets me simmer or boil quickly, doesn't require pressurized canisters or bottles that can't easily be refilled, and unlike my twig stoves works even if it's been raining for days. With the fuel in the stove plus that pint bottle, I have more than two weeks of 3-meal days' worth of cooking. With the fuel in the bike, I can camp and cook indefinitely. Even if the bike were to break down in the boonies, or I got injured to where I could walk but not ride out, I'd be able to boil water and stay warm for weeks. I can't see any downside for carrying such a stove while moto-camping.

    I've recently picked up another Coleman stove, a 550B multi-fuel (it's on the right, the 442's on the left). A later evolution of the burner enables running Coleman fuel, unleaded gas, or kerosene, or a blend of these. It's also smaller and lighter than the 442 (18 oz empty versus 28 oz for the 442), and it runs a little hotter as well. If I had to keep just one, it'd be the 550B... but I like them both and will likely use the 550B for hiking and overnight camping and the 442 for moto trips.

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    So, all told, the 550B weighs about the same as one of those lightweight multiple-piece multi-fuel stoves from MSR or Primus with the necessary bottle. Maybe a butane cartridge stove is lighter even with the fuel canister... but if I'm riding the lack of weight compared to the 550B or even the 442 doesn't offset the ability to run fuel out of the tank plus that Coleman reliability and durability.
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  10. Lowndes

    Lowndes Been here awhile

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    Well done, ObiJohn. And I came to the same conclusion years ago. My son joined a Boy Scout troop (and I eventually became the Scoutmaster) that was focused on backpacking. We did an overnight somewhere once a month, rain or shine, snow or blow, and an extended Adventure once a year somewhere. It was great. We did a lot on the Appalachian Trail in GA and NC. We canoed the Okefenokee and the Boundry Waters many times.

    I eventually bought most of the available stoves, propane, butane, Coleman Peak 1 (400), MSR, Sevea, etc, etc. I even made a variety of penny stoves. After all the stoves and camping my go-to stove was and is the Peak 1 for the exact reasons you stated so well, plus it's much faster to get set up and going than other stoves.

    The only parts that might fail are the pump piston and the generator tube - it will sometimes get clogged with carbon deposits. An old thru-hiker on the AT we shared a shelter with one night in the snow on Clingmans Dome told me that it won't clog if you put a tablespoon of automobile carburetor cleaner in every gallon of Coleman fuel. That seems to work ok but I've only tested it for 25 years or so.
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  11. ObiJohn

    ObiJohn Screaming Banshee Supporter

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    Yep... I had left that 442 in its bag in a storage box in my garage for 15 years, with Coleman camp fuel inside... and it started right up and worked. If you run pure CF you'll never have a problem. Nevertheless, I've been putting an ounce of Seafoam per gallon can of CF since 2017 (when I pulled the stove out of storage) and never had a problem. It's pretty much what I run per gallon of unleaded in my bikes.
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  12. PNWet

    PNWet Long timer

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    I'm a big fan of Sea Foam, but I'm curiuos as to what your thinking is here...
  13. ObiJohn

    ObiJohn Screaming Banshee Supporter

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    Well, Seafoam is basically light kerosene with other solvents, e.g., white spirits, tuolene, xylene, isopropanol. (You can't look at the MSDS and get the exact ingredients; Seafoam claims that the formula is a trade secret.) From what I understand, these stoves (just like carburators) get clogged with varnish when the highly volatile parts of fuel evaporate leaving a thicker sludge of less volatile compounds. Gasoline won't dissolve these compounds; you need petroleum solvents, e.g., Seafoam. Because of it's components/ingredients, Seafoam acts a little like a lubricant (the light kerosene, similar to 3-in-1 Oil or WD-40), a protectant, and a cleaner. Light kerosene is also a solvent and will dissolve varnish. However, the chemicals in Seafoam will not attack aluminum, gaskets, washers, or O-rings. For instance, I've used it as a lube for the pump mechanisms, and it works fantastically for that and also helps keep the check valve from sticking due to varnish buildup.

    From what I understand, the difference between CF-only Coleman stoves and dual- or multi-fuel Coleman stoves is that the founts (tanks) of dual- and multi-fuel stoves are lined with some sort of epoxy to protect the tanks from corrosion. There are a lot of aluminum parts on the newer stoves and I think that the 400-series (400, 400A, 400B, 442) starting in the '80s and the newer 500-series (533, 550B) starting in the '90s have aluminum founts. Ethanol because of its hydroscopic nature is very hard on uncoated aluminum. I believe Coleman fuel has some anti-corrosive additives today... that's why they don't call it 'white gas' any more, because it's more than just naptha. The idea behind Seafoam is to use a lubricating preservative and solvent that will prevent the internal parts of these stoves from corroding and keep internal valve and generator parts moving, while also eliminating any varnish from dried fuel, and it seems to work very well. I don't think you get the same benefits with carb cleaner or injector cleaner... and some of those compounds will attack the older O-rings and gaskets in these stoves, and they also have very toxic chemicals that I don't want anywhere near what I may ingest.

    BTW, I tried an experiment with the 550B... with the kerosene generator it is not as hot with CF. I mixed up some 'Amish mix' with 80% CF to 20% K-1 light kerosene by volume. It light well, burned VERY well, and much hotter than CF with the kerosene generator OR CF with the gas generator. I was going to try different mixtures, but stopped at 80:20 CF/kero. I'm going to try it in the 442 today and see if it burns as well as it did in the 550B. Generally, you can't burn 100% kero in these stoves... the 550B is an exception with the kero generator... because the gas generator has too large of an opening and, because kero has a much higher flash point temperature (~100F) versus CF (0F). The larger opening/jet in the gas generators don't give kero enough time to be heated enough to vaporize; the result is that we don't get that tight blue flame but instead a billowy yellow flame. Yet, kero has about 30% more BTUs per gallon than CF. The idea behind the 80:20 mix, also called 'Amish mix', came from the Amish and others who depended on white gas lamps and stoves, and so they used to combine white gas and kero in these proportions to reduce fuel costs while still being able to effectively use it. I assume that one could cut other, less volatile fuels like JP4, JP8, or even diesel in the same proportion to extend a CF fuel supply under dire conditions. Nevertheless, I'll keep some of the Amish mix around for the 550B and hiking because it's less expensive and more efficient.
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  14. Gunerdo

    Gunerdo fromwanerbe

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    MSR Dragonfly would be my favourite at the minute, with excellent simmer control.

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  15. Jamie Z

    Jamie Z I'm serious. Supporter

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    Do you have the quiet adapter on there? My burner doesn't look like that.
  16. Gunerdo

    Gunerdo fromwanerbe

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    Yes, not a fan of the "roarer" burner.

  17. WQFTruckster

    WQFTruckster Adventure Engineer

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    I thought I would post up my latest "corona" project. I have an old Svea 123 stove of my Dad's. Best guess is it is early 1970s vintage. My Dad used it for a lot of backpacking in the late 70s. It has seen a substantial portion of the Appalachian Trail. He gave it to me about 20 years ago and I have used it on several backpacking trips and more recently motorcycle camping. It was acting up on my last trip so I decided it was time to give it some love. Disassembled, cleaned, polished, lacquered, new rubber and graphite seals, new wick. It's taken me about a month to get it done. Probably 8+ hours of cleaning and polishing. I had to order the parts from The Fettlebox store in the UK. I'm pretty happy with how it turned out. Works like new!

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  18. MEDIC-0372

    MEDIC-0372 Been here awhile

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    Very nice!!!
  19. MEDIC-0372

    MEDIC-0372 Been here awhile

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    Looks like the same lid that I have on my old 1970's Boy Scout mess kit...

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  20. marchyman

    marchyman barely informed Supporter

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    Mine must have been from an earlier era. It had the guaranteed to burn your lips metal cup. :bluduh
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