Stuck under AT

Discussion in 'The Perfect Line and Other Riding Myths' started by VikingMoto, Apr 4, 2020.

  1. riots not diets

    riots not diets Adventurer

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    this shreder guy seems super chill and fun to hang out with
    #61
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  2. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short old guy

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    And that is why I sold my DR650. I could not push it uphill. It was too narrow, too steep, too much gravel to turn around. I am older. Time to get off the mountain permanently. I am too small, too weak and too brain damaged from concussions.
    #62
  3. phughes

    phughes Long timer

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    So, your answer is to remain laying under the bike...okay... :hmmmmm

    Often, people ride in an area they may not be completely familiar with, if at all. That person may not have the non-emergency number, at the same time, they may not know exactly what jurisdiction they are in, so looking up the number would be difficult to say the least. In the areas I ride, there are many overlapping areas, and jurisdictions. 911 is who most normal, logical people would call in that situation, trapped under a bike. Now, bike not on top of me, but need assistance, and I am not seriously injured. I will take the time to try to find a non-emergency number. For most rational adults though, the OP's situation falls within an acceptable criteria for calling 911, given all the variables. I write this as someone who worked with police for five years at one point, actually doing public presentations that included when to call 911.
    #63
  4. WolvesLower

    WolvesLower Been here awhile

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    That sounds scary.
    But if your not all the way drowned please don't bother emergency services. Call a tow truck
    #64
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  5. CopaMundial

    CopaMundial Wow, that broke easy

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    Was riding with my son (19 or 20 at the time) and noticed he fell on a pretty basic but off camber turn with some roots. I was in front so didn’t see him go down, but stopped and jogged back the 50 feet or so to help him up.
    He was face down, on the slightly downhill side, and his bike (a DR650) was across his leg. He was flailing around a good bit so I arrived laughing at the fact that he couldn’t get out.
    Only then did I realize he was flailing because the header pipe was cooking a hole in his calf right above his boot. There was no way he could have pulled himself out of there.
    Took probably two months to heal and scared the shit out of both of us.
    #65
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  6. WindBlast

    WindBlast Jesus and Tequila

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    Back when I first started riding I wore lace up cowboy style boots as my riding boots. (I also wore a Wilson's leather jacket but that is another story). After a long fun ride the whole length of the Angeles Crest Hwy from I-15 I eventually came to a red light in La Canada. I coasted to a stop and went to put left foot down and found it didn't come off the peg. My boot lace had come undone and wrapped around the peg locking my foot in place. Bang! Down I went. Luckily the folks in the car behind me helped me get out from under. No harm or real damage except to my ego. I bought some proper moto boots shortly thereafter.
    #66
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  7. Tricepilot

    Tricepilot Bailando Con Las Estrellas Super Moderator Super Supporter

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    ^ I thought I was the only one :brow. Got wrapped the same way but discovered it before stopping. Didn’t go down, but I had to pull over and lean on my right while I reached down to undo the snag.
    #67
  8. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    I once had my shoelace catch on the gearshift so kicked it into first as I tried to put my foot down. Fortunately a small bike with very little torque or weight.

    Talked to a guy who got the kickstart up his trouser leg. No putting that foot down.
    #68
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  9. BikePilot

    BikePilot Long timer

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    Sorry you got stuck and glad you got out! As for picking up heavy bikes, it doesn't take all that much strength with good technique. There's a very small, older lady who is well known for laying down and picking up a 'wing at bike rallies and shows. All about property leverage/technique really. Same with being stuck under a bike. In nearly all situations I think a rider can pry and wiggle free, but it takes thoughtful analysis of the situation and use of leverage, not force. A bit like skiing. New skiers fall and immediately try to pop up without paying attention to orientation, etc. flail around a lot, and struggle mightily. Experienced ones spin their skies down/hill and position body weight such that standing is near effortless.

    All that said life is easier with less weight when the going gets rough.
    #69
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  10. davenowherejones

    davenowherejones short old guy

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    It gets trickier when you are on the edge of a cliff on a steep narrow loose road by yourself in the middle of nowhere.
    #70
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  11. Barry

    Barry Just Beastly

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    OK... interesting thread. I'll leave the ultra tough guy comments alone... nobody is gonna' change anyone's opinion, that much is very clear.

    I do not ride off-road alone on my 525 EXC, and DEFINITELY not on my 990 Adventure R, beyond say a forest gravel road, or super easy dirt. I do not want to 1) be injured alone or 2) stuck under a 990 Adventure. IF I was going to go off to the boonies solo, I'd fork over the money for a SPOT or similar tracker, with 2 way comms. That's prudent IMHO.

    More than a couple years ago I was riding my WR250R in mid-90s summer temps, full armor, lot of protective gear... I was hot, tired, and lost. Got my bearings and decided to cut the trail, and bushwack, as I knew where a road was and how to get back that way. By this decision I was very hot, and very tired.

    Crossing a creek I climbed the bank, or a log, and ended up falling over cuz it was a technical move, and I was wiped out. Bike fell on my leg. Took me about 5-10 minutes to gather up the strength to get a 250 off me, given how tired I was. I got it off, but for a minute I was thinking "well, you are stuck".


    So... yes, if I'm alone and dark is coming, and temps are low, I'm not staying stuck under a bike - period. Will I try to NOT use emergency services, yes, but I'm fucking calling someone. Get over it.

    Barry
    #71
  12. shrederscott

    shrederscott Long timer

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    Hi

    My apologies, I was not clear in my posting. To " remain laying under the bike " is NOT a what I meant !

    The situation of being solo and pined under a bike on a dirt road is not a good one.

    If the rider had a one way emergency beacon (spot, acr) then hitting the SOS button when he did would be a reasonable choice.

    This rider had two way text communication available. The rider should have used his 2-way texting system, texted his friends/family requesting non-emergency help. If that failed ...then hitting the SOS would be a reasonable choice.

    To me the problem is that the rider hit 911 BEFORE fully trying to use all of his own resources to self rescue.

    To be clear ... just laying under the bike is NOT what I am suggesting ... sorry for the confusion.


    Scott
    #72
  13. jezza909

    jezza909 Adventurer

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    Why not just carry one of those bike lift rachety things?
    #73
  14. phughes

    phughes Long timer

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    He tried for an hour to get out on his own. His nearest relative was 350 miles away. He hit the SOS button on his Garmin. He did what he needed to do, and all is well.
    #74
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  15. slartidbartfast

    slartidbartfast Life is for good friends and great adventures Supporter

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    A great tool to pick up the bike if you are standing next to it. Probably not deployable while laying under the bike. So... Yes, not a bad idea to carry, if your bike is too heavy for you to easily pick up but would probably not have helped in this case.
    #75
  16. sluagh

    sluagh not fade away

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    First off, I have no criticism of viking for contacting emergency services. Being pinned under a motorcycle for possibly a very long time is a genuine emergency. He did try to rescue himself and did communicate to S&R what the circumstances were and it was the experts at search and rescue who decided that they should assist. Perhaps another approach would have been to text folks at home and have them arrange for a non emergency rescue from a tow truck. Something for the rest of us to think about. But again, assuming that viking communicated the situation and emergency services chose to respond the way they did makes me think he did the right thing.

    To bikepilot:
    "As for picking up heavy bikes, it doesn't take all that much strength with good technique."​

    You weren't there, you didn't have the bike laying on your foot and you don't know how hard it would be to lift it under those circumstances. As you noted it's technique not strength but technique requires proper position which is very limited when you are pinned under several hundred pounds.

    Thanks, viking for posting this. It's helpful for others to think about how they would respond in similar situations and that's the value in these discussions.

    Edit: I'll just add that I give credit to the local S&R people that they would have enough sense to respond to this situation appropriately so that they would retain sufficient reserve capability to respond to other emergencies.
    #76
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  17. kneeslider

    kneeslider Insufficient privileges!

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    hmm, cutting your leg off wasn't an option eh?
    #77
  18. Lazarus12

    Lazarus12 Adventurer

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    My daughter is an EMT. She says, half the calls they go on are unnecessary. Someone fell out of their chair and can’t get up. But they do what they do with respect, and we pay for those services with our taxes.

    1. So, everyone’s idea of an emergency is different.
    2. Sometimes the EMT’s practice on cars to extract (jaws of life), and that sort of thing.
    I don’t see that as a waste of tax payer money.
    3. S&R also sets up practice situations like this to hone their skills.
    So they got some practice in.
    BTW, I tell my daughter to hit the lights when she goes past my house, because I’m a taxpayer.:-) 5A20178C-3D75-45E7-B80C-AF2A56376B81.jpeg
    #78
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  19. Husky360C

    Husky360C Been here awhile

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    On a paved surface the above might be true, but in slippery mud or clay it is far from guaranteed to be possible for one person to pick up a heavy bike.

    And yes, I've seen those "it's easy to pick up a bike if you use the proper technique" videos too. I'd LOVE to see that woman try to pick up a KTM 950 that's on its side in slippery wet clay. There's a world of difference between picking a bike up on pavement and picking a bike up in clay or mud.
    #79
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  20. Husky360C

    Husky360C Been here awhile

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    Please explain how you're going to use that thing when you're pinned under the bike.:imaposer:rofl:jack
    #80
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